Courses

Spring 2013 Courses

Registration for these courses will take place on SIS Online and will begin at 9:00am on the first day of Spring classes, Wednesday, January 16. Registration will continue for open courses until 5:00pm on Thursday, January 31. This page was last updated 01/22/13.

Please check back for updates, as we are still awaiting some approvals for courses to count toward program, major, or distribution credit. We will also post preliminary syllabi as we receive them from instructors.


Courses Open to All Students


EXP-0001-S: American Superheroes: Power, Politics, and Morality
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04207
Monday, 6:00-8:30PM, East 015

The superhero has been a part of American culture since 1938, but in recent years its prominence has grown tremendously thanks to the genre's proliferation in film, on television, and even in traditional fiction.

What does the new-found popularity of superhero narratives tell us about American society at the beginning of the 21st century? What can the evolution of the genre tell us about the ways in which American ideas about power, politics, morality, and heroism have changed over the last seventy-three years? This course will offer students a hands-on approach to the genre through in-depth analysis of prominent graphic novels, films, and traditional fiction. Through a research project, students will use a specific example or element of the genre to come to a greater understanding of how the superhero story reflects and perhaps even shapes the broader American culture.

Matthew Pustz is the author of Comic Book Culture: Fanboys and True Believers and the editor of Comic Books and American Cultural History (forthcoming). He is currently teaching American history and popular culture at Endicott College and Fitchburg State University and holds a PhD in American Studies from the University of Iowa.


EXP-0002-S: The Ethnography of Religious Communities
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04208
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30PM, Olin 107

What does it mean to come together in religious worship, belief, and everyday practice? How is this communal life manifested different religious traditions? And how do ethnographers study these communities?

This course explores collective religious life through a series of classic and contemporary ethnographies. It also prepares students theoretically and methodologically to conduct their own fieldwork, whether in a religious or non-religious setting. Through vibrant ethnographic texts, we will study the best practices of anthropological research and writing. Through creative observation and writing exercises, we will hone our own eyes, ears, and pens. Finally, research ethics training will prepare us to enter the field ourselves. Through a focus on religious communities and the scholars who study them, this course will teach the art and craft of ethnography.

This course has been approved by the Religion department to count for Humanities distribution credit.

Kirsten Wesselhoeft has conducted extensive fieldwork in France and America on religious communities. She is an advanced PhD student in the Study of Religion at Harvard University.


EXP-0004-S: The Corset and the Crown: The History and Politics of Fashion
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04209
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30PM, Olin 103

How do politics and gender perceptions intertwine as both women's and men's roles and fashions seem to be constantly in a state of flux? Why do humans feel the need to change their clothing constantly?

This course looks at changes in Western dress from the age of the Renaissance to the retro trends of today by focusing on issues of body and sexuality as well as political power and global influence. We will examine how clothing acts as a vehicle for political and social meaning. We will both explore everyday meanings related to how we dress and historical concerns embedded in the study of dress -- a venture that is uniquely positioned to bridge the gap between large-scale historical events and the microhistory of individuals and communities.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Alexandra van den Berg has worked with the costume collection of the Slater Memorial Museum and the American Textile History Museum. She has sewn historically accurate garments for displays in both institutions. Her recent projects include research in the role of clothing in the aftermath of the French Revolution and hand-sewing a pair of 18th century stays. Alexandra is a recent graduate of the Tufts History and Museum Studies masters program.


EXP-0005-S: Exploring Contemporary ASL Literature
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading, Call #04210
Tuesday and Thursday, 4:30-5:45PM, East 015

What is American Sign Language (ASL) literature? How is it connected with identity, politics, and history? Who is in the deaf culture?

This course is designed for students interested in continuing beyond basic language courses. Deaf American performance art and literature is examined and explored in the context of culture and linguistics. Trends in drama, narrative, poetry and film in the twentieth and twenty-first century are discussed throughout the semester. Through readings, viewing of performance pieces, and discussion of both well-known and local artists, we will explore how the literature of ASL deals with issues of politics, minority, language, and bi-cultural life.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Gabrielle Weiler has been professionally interpreting and translating ASL in the Boston area for six years. She is nationally certified, and holds an AAS in interpretation from Rochester Institute of Technology. Currently, she is studying theater at Tufts.


EXP-0006-S: Medical Spanish
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04211
Monday and Wednesday, 6:00-7:15PM, Lane 100 *New location

This course provides an overview of the practice of Spanish-language medical interpretation. Students will build their skills in communication, ethics, and medical vocabulary, including psychology and psychiatry, while exploring questions of culture and advocacy.

Students will ave an opportunity to practice interpretation in a simulated medical setting by emphasizing the following areas: bilingual fluency for social and medical conversation; interpreting skills and techniques; the code of ethics for medical interpreters (in relation to that of doctors); health beliefs and practices in a range of Spanish-speaking cultures; and cross-cultural communications challenges in the medical setting. Instruction is geared toward students with intermediate to advanced language skills, and will reinforce students' prior knowledge of Spanish grammar. This course will be taught in Spanish.

Josep Vicente is currently a medical interpreter with Medical Interpreters of the North Shore. Born and raised in Spain, he holds a degree in Romance Languages and Linguistics from the Universitat de Barcelona.


EXP-0007-S: The Editing Process in Fiction Writing
1.0 credit,Pass/Fail Grading, Call #04212
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00-7:15PM, East 016

"To write is human, to edit is divine."-- Stephen King.

Many accomplished authors have said that the hard part of writing fiction is not the writing itself, but rather the editing process that comes afterward. If you are serious about getting published, then you must be able to cut your work down and fine-tune it into the best possible version of your story. This course will cover everything you need -- from grammar issues to manuscript formatting, from the words that can be trimmed from a sentence, to whole passages that can be trimmed from a novel -- to turn your rough drafts into a true representation of your potential as a writer.

Elizabeth Eilbert is a Tufts senior majoring in English with a focus on creative writing. She has a Documents folder full of drafts, but her commitment to ruthless editing is such that not one of them has been deemed finished. Her greatest writing accomplishment to date has been cutting a 200,000 word manuscript down to less than 60,000 words.


EXP-0010-S: YA: The Young Adult Novel *This course has been cancelled.
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04213
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30PM, East 015

The publishing industry is dying, or so many have claimed. There is one major sector of growth, however: the young adult (YA) novel, a genre that didn't exist before the mid-twentieth century and whose defining features few can agree upon.

This course will explore the YA novel – including such key texts as Catcher in the Rye, Lord of the Flies, The Hobbit and The Hunger Games – and its significance today. How we talk about the YA novel acts as a referendum on major questions about the role of literature in contemporary society: the relationship between literature and morality, the boundaries of freedom of speech, the limits of consumerism and commodification in popular culture. We will look at YA fiction from its origins in children's and adult novels in the 1950s and 1960s to its current manifestations at the top of bestseller charts and the start of major multimedia franchises, alongside relevant cultural commentary on fiction. Questions to be considered include: What distinguishes a YA novel from a children's novel or an adult novel? Should young adults read controversial, sexually explicit, or violent literature? Can the commodification of YA franchises like Twilight or Gossip Girl produce artful literature? Why do adults today read books for teens -- and if adults read them, what makes them "young adult"?

Lesley Goodman is a PhD student in English literature at Harvard University and an avid reader of YA fiction. Her primary research is on Victorian literature and reader response, but her interest in the cultural status of literary objects connects these research topics with modern young adult fiction.


EXP-0014-S: The Art of Improvisation
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading, Call #04214
Monday and Wednesday, 6:00-7:15PM, Aidekman 12

Do you love to make people laugh? Are you spontaneous? Do you love to tell stories?

This course teaches the exciting art of improvisational comedy. Students in this course will explore the basics of improv performance, including scene building, agreement ("yes, and"), basic narrative skills, and physical characterization. At the same time, we will be reading important improv texts, discussing improvisational theory, and relating its principles to our daily lives. Our work will be inspired by the teachings of the improvisational experts and theorists such as Keith Johnstone, Del Close, Tina Fey, and Amy Poehler (founder of the improv troupe My Mother's Flea Bag at Boston College). The structure of this course will be highly interactive and discussion-based, with field trips, guest speakers, and group performance. No experience necessary.

Rachel Schoenbrun has been studying and performing improv for over eight years. She is currently the director of Tufts' only improv comedy troupe, Cheap Sox, and has taught improvisational theater at a variety of institutions. This past year, she studied at the British American Drama Academy, a prestigious acting conservatory in the heart of London. She is a senior at Tufts University majoring in Drama.

Adam Bangser has been studying and performing improv since high school. He serves as the Treasurer of Cheap Sox, and has taught younger members of Cheap Sox the art of improv. Adam performs regularly in theatrical productions at Tufts and is a junior majoring in English.


EXP-0015-S: Performance of Radical Politics: 1960 to the Present
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04215
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30PM, Olin 116 *New location

From Reverend Billy to The San Francisco Mime Troupe to The Vagina Monologues and beyond – since the 1960s, Americans have cultivated a vibrant tradition of performing their politics through protest theater and performance activism.

This course will examine the history and evolution of these forms in the United States from the 1960s to the present. Not only will we explore some of the well-documented groups of the period, but we will also look to non-traditional forms uner recognized populations. We will examine the ideologies, practices and cultural events that motivated these activists. Radical political performance, both then and now, is often sidelined as fringe or extreme. Yet marches, sit-ins, and creative demonstrations continue to be part of our day-to-day lives.

The existence of both Occupy Wall Street and the Tea Party make this class especially relevant, and we will end the semester with a discussion of groups that are still active today. Our study will rightfully show how political demonstration has played a pivotal role in the shaping of the national cultural landscape and influence scholarly thought across numerous academic disciplines.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course has been approved by the Drama and Dance department to count for Arts distribution credit.

Max Shulman is a doctoral fellow in the the Drama Department at Tufts University. His research focuses on how American popular theater functions as a reflection of political and cultural movements. Max received his Master's Degree from Hunter College where his thesis traced the evoluation of radical politics in the work of playwright Jacob Gordin.


EXP-0017-S: Illustrating Climate Change: Study and Practice
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04216
Tuesday, 7:00-9:30PM, Barnum 208

Learn to draw and paint forms, coloration, and details of natural objects you can hold. Discern how to evaluate a seen object or creature, looking for which details should be ignored and which are essential for identification. Experiment with a range of studio art materials, including scratchboard, silverpoint, and watercolor with paints you mix yourself from raw pigments.

In this course, students will make drawings while looking through a microscope, paint with seaweed, and draw a portrait of a live research frog with your paper underwater. We will also discover climate change artworks in art history, such as oil paintings by Peter Breugel in 16th century Germany, seamen's diaries of volcanic eruptions in the 18th century, and oversized oil paintings of glaciers commissioned by Queen Victoria in the 19th century. Finally, we will look at how modern artists are encountering the intersection of climate change and art through the artist-in-residence programs in modern Antarctica, or interviewing an installation artist who collected sound while voyaging with Greenland seal hunters.

This course has been approved to count toward the Environmental Studies major.
Learn more about which track >


This course has been approved by the Art and Art History Department to count toward Arts Distribution credit.

Diane Fiedler is a professional illustrator whose design and art clients include The Broad Institute, Fidelity Investments, The Boston Globe, Astra-Zeneca Pharmaceuticals, and Harcourt-Brace. In addition to the ExCollege, Diane's nature art courses have been offered at the Museum of Science Boston, Fidelity Investments, and in Skopelos, Greece.


EXP-0020-S: Forensic Science: An Exploration
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04218
Thursday, 6:00-8:30PM, Barnum 114 *New location

This course offers a study into the actual science of solving crimes.

We will integrate criminal investigative scenes and in the modern crime laboratory. Topics will include the recognition of physical evidence, evidence collection, chemical and physical analysis of trace evidence such as hairs, fibers, bloodspatter, fingerprints, presentations of firearms, fingerprinting, shoe print and tire track identifications bloodspatter reconstruction, and historical case reviews which make use of crime scene reconstruction exercises.

James Jabbour is a retired police officer after 30 years in law enforcement and the current Director of the Forensic Science Program and Assistant Professor at Mount Ida College. He was involved in numerous case investigations from crime scenes to forensic analysis of evidence to recreation and reconstruction in preparation for presentation in court. He holds a Master of Science Degree from the University of New Haven.


EXP-0024-S: Transporters, Force Fields, and Death Stars: Engineering in Science Fiction
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04219
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30PM, Eaton 204

Want to enjoy lunch in France? Teleport to Paris for escargot.

Hate snowball fights? Build a force field to protect yourself.

This course will examine the possibilities of such impossibilities through the analysis of science fiction, a genre that fosters an appreciation of science, technology, creativity and literature. The works of Gene Rodemberry, H.G. Wells, Jane Espensen, Isaac Asimov and others who utilize various technologies as plot devices to advance the story. Whether by jumping from one star system to another faster than the speed of light, encountering robots making emotional decisions, or escapes using stealth systems in broad daylight, the technology showcased is fantastic and seemingly impossible. We will discuss some of our favorite depictions of advanced technologies, their plausibility, and how their fictional works have inspired real-life technological creativity.

Students will work in multidisciplinary teams on both analytical and creative assignments, collaborating with individuals of varying interests and mindsets as we work towards common goals. Our projects will include short stories, analysis reports, prototype designs and more. Throughout the semester we will develop an understanding of the natural sciences and technology by seeing how it is used in fiction. With that understanding, students will develop a useful framework for the evaluation of such seemingly impossible technologies to use (1) while analyzing or writing works of science fiction, or (2) as inspirations for scientific and engineering pursuits.

Brian O'Connell has designed advanced optronic masts and a digital camera base replacement for a periscope for the United States Navy and Allied naval submarines. He has been a life long lover of science fiction, STEM, and education. Brian is an MS/PhD student in Mechanical Engineering at Tufts University. He is a currently a research assistant at Tufts' Center for Engineering Education and Outreach for a project where literature is used as an inspiration for engineering projects in elementary school classrooms.


EXP-0026-S: Architecture/Music: Sound and the Built Environment
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading, Call #04220
Monday and Wednesday, 6:00-7:15PM, Aidekman 13

As Goethe once observed, "I call architecture frozen music . . .; the influence that flows upon us from architecture is like that from music." Spaces speak- are you listening?

Sound is an omnipresent influence within our environment, but very few people actually listen to what they hear. This class will explore the many dimensions of how sound interacts within the built environment, exploring topics including archaeoacoustics, aural architecture, space and sound analysis, music and performance, visual art, film, hands-on sound production, and as many other applications as could possibly be deemed reasonable. We will take field trips to our own Granoff Music Center as well as to Boston Symphony Hall and engage in guest lectures given by some of the leading Boston area acousticians. Informal studio sessions and conceptual discussions invite students to synthesize their own diverse experiences in the soundscape of our world. The ultimate goal is to take creative license in forming your own perceived "point of audition." Note: no previous experience with music or architecture is required - students of all areas of interest are warmly welcomed.

Amelia Wellers is a senior majoring in music and minoring in architectural studies. She is an active singer at Tufts, and studied architecture in Copenhagen, Denmark in the spring of 2012.


EXP-0028-S: Climate Change and the Life Cycle of Plants
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04221
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30PM, Eaton 207

Anthropogenic climate change has become a topic of increasing concern not only to scientists, but to politicians, farmers, people who rely on tourism, and the general public as well. As we become more aware of the consequences of climate change, we seek ways to understand and quantify the changes occurring to the natural world. The centuries old study of phenology, the study of the timing and natural events, has experienced a resurgence of popularity as it has become widely recognized to be one of the most robust ways to quantify the effects of climate change. In this course we will examine the history of phenology, some of the oldest records of which are thought to be from China in the year 974 BCE, the science behind plant responses to temperature, and what the future holds for forest ecosystems. We will also examine the role the iconic American figures such as Thomas Jefferson, Henry David Thoreau, and Aldo Leopold play in current climate change research, as well as the increasing public participation in gathering phenology data through citizen science programs.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course has been approved to count toward the Environmental Studies major.
Learn more about which track >


Caroline Polgar speaks widely on climate change and leads workshops in the field as well. She is currently completing her PhD in the Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior group of the Biology Department at Boston University.


EXP-0030-S: Sabermetrics: The Objective Analysis of Baseball
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04222
Thursday, 6:00-8:30PM, Bromfield-Pearson 05

This course will teach the fundamentals of the emerging science of Sabermetrics, the objective analysis of baseball. In addition, and where appropriate, we will explore the science of baseball scouting.

Students will discuss baseball not through conventional wisdom and consensus, but by searching for knowledge concerning the game of baseball. Hitting, pitching, fielding performance, along with other areas of sabermetrics, will be analyzed and better understood with current and historical baseball data. Students will design and implement their own sabermetric research study, learning the important concepts in statistical analysis needed to perform this research.

Andy Andres (N '99) is an Assistant Professor of Natural Science at Boston University, a Data Analyst at BaseballHQ.com, and a die-hard Red Sox fan.


EXP-0032-S: Sexual Wellness on College Campuses
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04223
Thursday, 6:00-8:30PM, Aidekman 13 *New time

What are the social, emotional, and cognitive skills that college students need to make healthy decisions and engage in fulfilling relationships? How do the sexual cultures on college campuses today constrain and facilitate college students' sexual health?

In this course, we will address these questions through an interdisciplinary study of sexuality development at college. We will draw primarily from social science perspectives on sexuality development in adolescence and young adulthood in addition to critical theory regarding how sexuality is shaped by cultural and institutional dynamics of power and privilege. With course themes relevant to students' own lives and to national and global debates, in-class activities will build critical consciousness and bring a social justice lens into the conversation. Through this course, students will become leaders, working both independently and collaboratively to impact campus culture and promote positive sexuality development for themselves and their peers through health promotion and advocacy efforts.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Mimi Arbeit has over a decade of experience in teaching sexuality education for youth and young adults, as well as advocating for improvements in sexuality education curriculum and programs. Currently, she is a doctoral student in the Eliot-Pearson Department of Child Development at Tufts, where she implements a positive, strength-based approach to study how school-based and out-of-school-time programs can support young people in developing the social, emotional, and cognitive skills they need to pursue sexual health in their lives and in their communities.


EXP-0033-S: Campus Community Emergency Response Team
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail Grading, Call #03915
Wednesday, 1:00-3:00 PM, Sophia Gordon MP Room

The C-CERT course provides students with the skills required by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to serve as a Community Emergency Response Team member within their campus community. Completion of this training will provide the student with the basic skills they may need in the aftermath of a disaster or other emergency and the opportunity to assist the Tufts Community and the Department of Public Safety by joining Tufts C-CERT. By working together, C-CERT members can assist in saving lives and protecting property using the skills gained in this course. This course meets FEMA and Emergency Management Institute (EMI) requirements for CERT training.

Mark Roche is a member of the Tufts University Police Department and a certified CERT Instructor. He also serves as a CERT Team Leader and Operations Captain with a local Emergency Management agency. He is currently an instructor for the Experimental College teaching the Rape Aggression Defense for Women and Advanced Rape Aggression Defense courses.


EXP-0034-S: RAD for Men *This course has been cancelled.
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail Grading, Call #03916
Monday, 7:00-9:00PM, Sophia Gordon MP Room

Providing "responsible information" about self defense training to men may not be what they are in fact looking for. Some attendees will be seeking a program that will teach them how to fight, bully or exact revenge on previously committed wrongs. This however could not be farther from our program's focus of self defense. In addition, "tactical options" of avoidance and disengagement are in fact responsible and successful the vast majority of the time, because men are generally not assaulted simply because they are men, as women often are. Most men (not all) "find themselves in confrontational situations" often as a result of their own choices and removing themselves from these situations is usually very easy when pride, anger, and ego are not factors.

Luis Santamaria is a member of the Tufts University Police Department. He has been teaching RAD for women over the last four years and RAD for men over the last two years. He has attended the certification for both programs and successfully completed the requirements. He holds a M.A. in Criminal Justice Administration from Western New England University.


EXP-0035-AS: Rape Aggression Defense
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail Grading, Call #03917
Wednesday, 4:30-6:30PM, Sophia Gordon MP Room

The Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.) is based on the philosophy of choices: "to develop and enhance the OPTIONS of self defense, so that they become more viable considerations for the woman who is attacked." While it is completely natural to resist, unless a woman is trained to do so the resistance she attempts may be futile. This course will try to strengthen innate survival techniques by making more options available. Preparation through education and training is usually the best way to survive an assault situation. Issues that will be addressed include awareness and prevention, sexual assault definitions, patterns of encounter, the decision to resist, basic principles of self-defense, and the defensive mindset. This course will end with realistic simulation training.

Mark Roche and Kerri Dervishian are members of the Tufts University Police Department and certified R.A.D. instructors.


EXP-0035-BS: Rape Aggression Defense
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail Grading, Call #03918
Thursday, 4:30-6:30 PM, Sophia Gordon MP Room

The Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.) is based on the philosophy of choices: "to develop and enhance the OPTIONS of self defense, so that they become more viable considerations for the woman who is attacked." While it is completely natural to resist, unless a woman is trained to do so the resistance she attempts may be futile. This course will try to strengthen innate survival techniques by making more options available. Preparation through education and training is usually the best way to survive an assault situation. Issues that will be addressed include awareness and prevention, sexual assault definitions, patterns of encounter, the decision to resist, basic principles of self-defense, and the defensive mindset. This course will end with realistic simulation training.

Darren Weisse is a member of the Tufts University Police Department and a certified R.A.D. instructor.


EXP-0036-S: Advanced Rape Aggression Defense
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail Grading, Call #03919
Monday, 4:45-6:45PM, Sophia Gordon MP Room

Advanced Rape Aggression Defense (Advanced RAD) is a continuation of the Basic program and answers a lot of the "what if" questions. The program will begin with a review of the basic program followed by simulation. This course is more hands on than the basic program and includes topics such as defending against multiple attackers and defense against weapons such as knives and guns. Throughout the course, the instructors will conduct realistic simulation training using impact targets and facilitate discussions on sexual assault, crime prevention and personal protection.

Mark Roche and Kerri Dervishian are members of the Tufts University Police Department and certified R.A.D. instructors.


EXP-0040-S: Positive Psychology Theory and Application
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04224
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00PM, Bromfield-Pearson 101

Strange as it may seem, science has lately turned its lens toward what makes us happy and how we can live well.

This class will introduce students to the field where much of this work is being done, that of Positive Psychology, and will begin to familiarize them with the research behind the science of happiness. We will focus on interventions that have been proven to impact the growth and development of college students and will require students to practice new strategies to make them happier. Course topics will include (but are not limited to) the study of character strengths, the science of happiness, goal setting, optimism, gratitude, and science-based positive psychology interventions.

Deb Levy was the Head Teaching Fellow in Professor Tal Ben-Shahar's extremely popular Positive Psychology course from 2007-2009 in the Psychology Department at Harvard University. Currently she specializes in coaching individuals and businesses, and her clients have included Tufts University Health Services, the MIT Center for Work and Family Life, the Harvard University Divinity School, and the University of Maine women's basketball team.


EXP-0042-S: The Right to Privacy in Modern America
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04225
Thursday, 6:30-9:00PM, Braker 226 *New location

An individual's right to marry? A woman's right to choose? Warrantless wiretapping? The right to bear arms? The right to die? Each and every one of these issues, and far more, have arisen before the United States Supreme court in recent years, expanding and contracting the breadth and scope of our right to privacy. Even in a new era of government, the scope of the right to privacy remains at the forefront of the collective American conscience.

This course will explore how Constitutional law has shaped the nature of the right to privacy and how the right may be evolving in modern America. We will concentrate on three particular areas: (1) privacy rights specifically enumerated in the Constitution, (2) privacy rights that have been read into the constitution, and (3) emerging ideas that may necessitate the extension or expansion of historically established concepts of privacy.

Douglas Martland is an Assistant Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He previously clerked for the Honorable Justice Gary Katzmann of the Massachusetts Appeals Court and for the judges of the Superior Court of Massachusetts.

Steve Sharobem is an Assistant Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He previously clerked for the Honorable Justice William Cowin of the Massachusetts Appeals Court and for the judges of the Superior Court of Massachusetts.


EXP-0043-S: Critical Theory and Personal Decision Making: Sex, Ethics, and Anarchy
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading, Call #04226
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00-7:15PM, Braker 209 *New location

How can we know what is right and wrong when it comes to our sex lives – and other peoples sex lives?

This course is an attempt not to answer the questions, but to frame the way we ask these questions: what sort of answers do they ask for? What grounds do we take for labeling a practice or motivation good or bad, ethical or unethical? How does all this concretely and specifically effect our lives, our friends' lives, our sexual and romantic partners' lives?

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Brandon Archambault is a senior at Tufts University working towards a double major in International Letters and Visual Studies (Russian, Japanese) and Child Development, and a minor in linguistics. He has developed an ethos of presenting critical theory in an approachable format, while insisting on its present practical and concrete applications.


EXP-0045-S: Introduction to Disability Studies
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04227
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30PM, Olin 112

How do people with disabilities narrate cultural expectations? How do they challenge or redefine them?

Employing a humanistic social scientific framework, this course aims to introduce students to theoretical and methodological approaches to an interdisciplinary study of disability. We will use personal narratives in artisitc, new media, epistolary, memoir, and poetic forms to examine how individuals with disabilities relate to a range of social and cultural contexts. We also aim to explore the role of the non-disabled in shaping disability cultures.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Aubry Threlkeld has been working on disability issues in educational settings for the last thirteen years. He is an independent educational consultant, resident tutor, and advanced doctoral student at Harvard University.


EXP-0046-S: Experimenting with Philanthropy
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04228
Thursday, 6:00-8:30PM, Eaton 124

Want to be an agent for community change? Wish you had money to give away to your favorite organization?

Working with a grant from the Highland Street Foundation, students in this course will have the opportunity to be philanthropists by serving as a youth board to award $10,000 in funding to local nonprofits of their choosing. Students will learn about the different types of, and approaches to, philanthropic giving, as well as the key elements of effective nonprofit management and sustainability. Students will also have the opportunity to conduct their own community project.

This course is supported by a grant from the Highland Street Foundation.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Nancy Lippe is the Associate Director of Civic Schools, a local Boston effort to reconnect schools with their civic mission, and she has led youth programs in schools and communities for the last fifteen years. Prior to moving to Boston, she worked as a program officer for a small community foundation in the San Francisco Bay Area, promoting youth programs, local philanthropy and connecting donors with local programs. Her work has involved being both a grant seeker and a grant maker, resulting in a great appreciation for the opportunities and challenges of both sides. She holds a doctorate in education from the Fielding Graduate University.


EXP-0050-CS: Media Literacy
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #03921
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Aidekman 9

In a media-saturated world, endless possibilities exist for what we can watch, read, listen to, and create. Yet all too often the flood of images overwhelms us, paralyzes us, and shapes our perceptions of ourselves, others and the world.

This class will focus on how we can deconstruct these images in order to use the media for positive social change, and avoid being used by it. We will examine media stereotypes of gender, ethnicity, race, and class, explore the role of the "citizen journalist," discuss the ways new media has changed the traditional media landscape, and think about the impact of media convergence and the ethical issues that arise when only a few corporations own the majority of news, entertainment, publishing, and internet outlets. Finally, by examining scholarly research, film clips, TV news and hearing guest speakers, we will focus on the importance of media literacy in our everyday lives, and how to use the media to become an active citizen.

Patrick Johnson has worked as a film and video editor in Los Angeles, cutting a number of independent feature films that have screened at film festivals throughout the world. He is an instructor of film and new media who has taught a Boston University, Tufts University Experimental College, and Keene State College. He received his MFA in Film Production from Boston University.


EXP-0051-S: Advanced Narrative and Documentary Practice
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #03922
Wednesday, 4:00-6:30 PM; Friday, 9:30-12:00 PM, 550 Boston Avenue

This course is a continuation of Introduction to Narrative and Documentary Practice taught last fall in the Experimental College. Each student will produce his or her proposed story under the individual guidance of the instructor. Student projects can employ a wide range of storytelling styles, including but not limited to investigative, historical, biographical, and autobiographical. They can address significant social, economic, political, and environmental issues, as well as capture and convey contemporary memory, life, and culture. The students will work closely with the instructor and other practitioners, constantly crafting and editing their projects and developing their own unique voice. Each project will be scrutinized for thorough and accurate research, original and ethically grounded reporting, and engaging storytelling. At the end of the semester, the stories will be published on the web. In addition, students will have regular opportunities to meet collectively, engage in peer review, and share stylistic and workflow strategies. While this course is designed as the logical next step for students who've completed the introductory level class in the fall, individuals who did not participate in the fall class may contact the instructor to determine whether or not they have the necessary preparation for joining this semester.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as an elective.

Gary Knight is a renowned photojournalist whose work - from South East Asia to Yugoslavia to Iraq and Afghanistan - has been published, exhibited and honored around the world. He is a founding member of the VII Photo Agency, dispatches magazine, and the Angkor Photo Festival. He is currently the Tufts' Institute for Global Leadership's Exposure INSPIRE Fellow.

Charles Sennot is the Vice President, Executive Editor and co-founder of GlobalPost, a web-based news site that covers events at home and around the word. An award-winning foreign correspondent with 25 years of experience, Sennott has reported on the front lines of wars and insurgencies in at least 15 countries, including the 2011 revolution in Cairo and the Arab Spring.


EXP-0052-S: Investigating Somerville: A Hands-on Approach to Reporting
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04229
Monday, 6:00-8:30PM, East 016

Despite the enormous changes in the mediascape and massive layoffs at newspapers and other news organizations, there is still no denying the power of the pen – and the cursor.

This course is an introduction to investigative journalism and is aimed at students with little or no real-world journalism experience. What you'll need is a desire to learn about this groundbreaking form of journalism, as well as a desire to learn about Somerville. You will also need the drive and passion necessary to find the angle, snag the interview, get "the goods" and then write it up (and perhaps work with a videographer for a video version of your story) in a way that attracts and holds the public's attention.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as an elective.

Jane Regan is a journalist and media scholar with three decades of experience in the United States, Latin America, and at the BBC. Regan has also received numerous awards for her print, television news, online and documentary film work, mostly in Haiti. She currently teaches investigative journalism in Haiti and coordinates a multimedia and multi-language watchdog reporting consortium.

Dan Atkinson is the Editor of The Somerville Journal. For nearly ten years, he has specialized in political coverage at newspapers around greater Boston.


EXP-0053-S: Experimental Film: Aesthetics and Production
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04128
Monday and Wednesday, 4:30-5:45 PM, Tisch 314

Whatever happened to experimental film? Avant-garde filmmaking flourished in Europe in the 1920s and 30s –and in the US from the 1940s to the 60s.

Today there seems to be no comparable experimental film movement, even as experimental and innovative techniques have become ever more widely available. However, the camera that would make filmmaking as flexible and as transparent as writing -- what French director and theorist Alexandre Astruc referred to as the "caméra stylo" (camera pen)--exists today in the form of HD video-capable DSLRs and iPhones. And experimental styles, projects, and ambitions crop up in a wide range of different contexts. These include the relatively uncompromising experiments of "structuralist" filmmakers such as Michael Snow and the work of such figures as Chantal Akerman, Abbas Kiarostami, and Derek Jarman. They also include the documentary films of Werner Herzog, the widely distributed work of Peter Greenaway and David Lynch (both of whom made important short experimental films before their better known work), and the music videos of such innovative artists as Michel Gondry and Spike Jonze.

This course will be co-taught by a professional filmmaker (Patrick Johnson) and a philosopher (Stephen White), and we will draw on the resources of the Experimental College and Tufts' Digital Design Studio. We will take both the history and current practice of experimental filmmaking as our inspiration in the production of experimental short films with equipment that includes camcorders, DSLR cameras, and iPhones. We will also draw on a range of sources outside film, including contemporary graphic novels, manga, and recent developments in experimental literature. Finally, we will look at the use of film in contemporary performance and installation art and at such "self-published" film experiments as those of Alex Roman, Anne-Sophie Maignant, and Reynold Reynolds on Vimeo.

This course counts as a Media Practice elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor, as a Film Practice elective for the Film Studies minor, and Media Practice credit for the Multimedia Arts minor.

Stephen White is Professor of Philosophy at Tufts. Along with film, his research interests include philosophy of mind, epistemology, meta-ethics, aesthetics

Patrick Johnson has worked as a film and video editor in Los Angeles, cutting a number of independent feature films that have screened at film festivals throughout the world. He is an instructor of film and new media who has taught a Boston University, Tufts University Experimental College, and Keene State College. He received his MFA in Film Production from Boston University.


EXP-0055-CS: Multiplatform Journalism for the 21st Century
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #03924
Monday, 1:30-4:00 PM, Lane 100A

Technology has transformed journalism into a genuinely multimedia enterprise, allowing journalists at every level to tell stories using a variety of media. Still, the primary responsibility of the journalist remains unchanged: To search for accurate information, digest and distill it, and then convey it compellingly. It's just that these days there's a lot more information to contend with, and a lot more decisions to make on how it can be conveyed best. In this course, students will learn by doing. They will serve as truth-seekers in digging up stories that seek to make sense of the world around us, and then hone their skills as multimedia storytellers, working across a variety of platforms – print, broadcast and Internet media. Questions to be explored include: What makes for a good story? How do you decide which media form will allow you to tell it best? And what are the skills that will be most important to journalists as they adapt to the needs of tomorrow?

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as an elective.

Neil Swidey (A '91) is a Boston Globe Magazine staff writer whose work has been featured in The Best American Science Writing, The Best American Crime Writing, and The Best American Political Writing. His video journalism has been nominated for an Emmy Award, and he has served as a news consultant and on-air analyst for NBC News. He is the author of The Assist, a Washington Post best book of the year, and co-author of the New York Times bestseller Last Lion: The Fall and Rise of Ted Kennedy.


EXP-0056-CS: Making Movies
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #03925
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Braker 001 AND Braker 002

What does it take to be a filmmaker? Are you ready to make the commitment?

This course will immerse students in the practice and logic associated with camera, lighting, audio and editing – all in the service of learning how to tell a story cinematically. Working in teams, students will complete a series of small projects aimed at developing their technical and stylistic skills. At the same time, they will engage in analyses of filmmakers whose styles and methods are not far removed from that of the class. The teams will then produce original short features, the last of which will be exhibited in a public screening at semester's end.

HIGH DEMAND. In order to be considered for enrollment, you MUST attend the first class meeting at 6:30pm on Thursday, January 17, in Braker 001.

This course counts as a Media Practice elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor, as a Film Practice elective for the Film Studies minor, and Media Practice credit for the Multimedia Arts minor.

Don Schechter (A '01, M '03) is the founder of Charles River Media Group, a Boston-based production company. He is currently co-producer, cinematographer, editor, and composer for an independent feature film called Marranos and has worked on numerous projects for such clients as The Rolling Stones, A&E, NBC, and The New York Times. Segments from his recent award-winning documentary, A Good Whack, were aired on MSNBC and the BBC.


EXP-0057-CS: Media Law and Ethics: Does the First Amendment Still Work?
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #03926
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Aidekman 9 *New time

Legal and ethical issues and changes in technology have always shaped how Americans get (or don't get) the news, from politically fueled rumors about Thomas Jefferson in 18th century newspapers, to paparazzi-fueled cable shows and web sites, to stories based on Tweets that are often false.

This course will examine basic issues of law and ethics that affect journalists and, more importantly, the public that the press is supposed to inform. It will review the political, historic, and philosophical roots of the First Amendment and provide an overview of key issues in press law, including libel, anonymous sources, and the right to privacy or lack thereof. Building on that legal foundation, the course will examine ethical issues, such as how to balance the public's right to know (and to view streaming cell phone videos) with an individual's right to privacy.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Social Sciences elective.

Phil Primack (A '70) is a longtime journalist who has covered politics, the economy and a range of other stories. A former staff reporter for both weekly and daily newspapers, his stories appear regularly in The Boston Sunday Globe Magazine. He is a contributing writer for CommonWealth magazine and has been published in The New York Times, Boston magazine, Columbia Journalism Review, and many other outlets. He has also worked as a policy advisor to elected officials, including former Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy II.


EXP-0058-CS: Social Marketing
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #03927
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Rabb Room, Lincoln Filene Center

Do we sell ideas the same way we hawk iPads? Are identical emotional strings pulling us to choose a president as to purchase an Impreza over a Prius? Are memes really the genes of our moral, social and cultural constructs? In our media saturated environment, the same tactics that create consumer lust, can also make us care about and invest in social causes, belief systems and political ideologies. We will explore why this is so through the theories that underlie the art of mass persuasion. But we will also learn by doing by working for six local non-profit organizations. Students will form teams that will each operate as a real world marketing consultant to its non-profit "client." They will analyze their clients' communications and marketing goals and produce a customized marketing communications plan that includes both strategies and tactics such as logos, web pages, print materials, digital media, or event and outreach concepts. Each class will include analyses of websites, advertisements and various campaigns. Guest speakers from the industry will add their perspective.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Social Sciences elective.

Gail Bambrick is Senior Marketing Communications Writer at Tufts. She uses the written word and strategic planning to focus Tufts' identity and messaging in online, print and web communications. She has also been Director of Publications and Associate Director of Communications and Public Relations for the university, as well as the News Media and Public Relations Manager for the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. She earned her Ph.D. at Tufts in American literature.


EXP-0059-CS: Environment, Communication, and Cultures
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #03929
Monday, 1:30-4:00 PM, Rabb Room, Lincoln Filene

Environmental concerns are both "easy" and very serious subject matter for today's vast array of media.

This new course will examine where our beliefs about environmental issues come from, how both news and entertainment media cover environmental challenges, and why good coverage of critical issues is so difficult. In addition, we will explore green marketing, the relationship among politics, environmental issues and media, and discuss how media can be used by individuals and advocacy groups to effect social change. This course serves as the required core course for the Environmental Communication track, is an elective for other ENVS majors and can count as a social science elective for one of the CMS minors.

This course has been approved to count toward the Environmental Studies major.
Learn more about which track >


This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Social Sciences elective.

Julie Dobrow is Director of the Communications and Media Studies and the Media and Public Service programs at Tufts. She holds a Ph.D. in Communications from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania.


EXP-0060-S: Authoritarianism in the Age of the Internet
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04230
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00PM, Barnum 114

Did Twitter really help bring down the regime of Egypt? Is the Great Firewall of China really so impenetrable? Will online social media help foster political change in Iran? Does the Internet really matter, at least in the ways we think it does?

In addition to such particular questions, this course will seek to answer a more one: How does political change happen and what role might Internet technology have in how that change occurs? Given the wide array of online social media, including microblogging, blogs, bulletin boards and other social networks, we will look at how citizens use these new platforms from which to challenge and subvert the state. At the same time, we will examine how these technologies can also become tools of the state, increasing control over citizens through the use of propaganda, surveillance and censorship. Ultimately, students will begin to understand how Internet technology affects the relationship between citizens and the state in authoritarian countries. Of particular interest will be such issues as citizen empowerment, regime entrenchment or weakening, and what is at stake for the actors involved.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Social Sciences elective.

Lacey Bradley-Storey has conducted extensive fieldwork in China on the uses of the Internet, including interviews with citizens and government officials and an in-depth content analysis of online petitions and Chinese language blogs. She is a an advanced PhD candidate in the Department of Political Science at Northeastern Universiity.


EXP-0061-S: Enemies and Neighbors: Israeli and Palestinian Fiction
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04231
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30PM, Barnum 114

In what ways can literature help us understand the Israeli-Palestinian conflict?

This question invites reflection on the power of imaginative writing--in this instance prose written after 1948, when Israel became a state. Reading novels, memoires, creative non-fiction, and short stories by authors from each side of the divide, we will explore this political situation in ways other than what the media offers us. We will consider our readings in their historical contexts and use close reading to uncover ways literature informs us through its art of expression. The intimate look that it affords us will bring us closer to the human yearnings, fears, angers and loves tangled in this contested situation.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Linda Dittmar is a Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Massachusetts Boston. Currently, she is teaching a course on Israeli and Palestinian Cinema at UMass Boston. She has taught film studies at Tel Aviv University, was a visiting lecturer at the University of Paris, and had two Fulbright teaching and lecturing grants to India. Linda grew up in Israel and received her PhD from Stanford University.


EXP-0062-F: A History of Piracy in the Modern World
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04232
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30PM, Lane 100A

Since humans began trading goods by ship, there have been pirates to raid those ships. Though often associated with the seventeenth- and eighteenth- century Caribbean, piracy is an ancient practice that is still very important today. Every day, many nations face the persistent problem of real sea-raiding off the Horn of Africa while battles are waged in print and in courts over allegations of "digital piracy."

This course investigates the history of, and our conceptions about, piracy from the sixteenth century to the present. We will ask: What does (and what did) piracy look like? What did it mean to be a pirate? How are pirates portrayed (in history, film, and literature) and why? We will explore primary source accounts of plundering voyages from the "golden age" of piracy, try to imagine piracy from the perspective of writers and intellectuals, read the scholarship about present-day piracies, and see the image of the pirate in film and literature.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

John Coakley was recently awarded a Newberry Renaissance Consortium Grant to further his research. He is an advanced doctoral student studying English pirates and privateers of the seventeenth century at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's History Department.


EXP-0064-S: Asian Cities in the 21st Century
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04233
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00PM, East 015

Asia is a rapidly urbanizing region that is home to 16 of the world's 25 largest cities. Between 1990 and 2010, the urban population of Asia increased by over 754 million people, equal to the combined population of the United States and the European Union.

In this course we will examine this vibrant region and some of the current themes relating to mass urbanization in various contexts and how these themes affect the built environment of Asian cities. A variety of themes will be explored through which students will gain familiarity with some of the major strands relating to urban change in Asia: identity, migration, shopping, green cities, religion, and ethnicity. The regions we will explore include East Asia (China, Japan, South Korea), Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Myanmar/Burma), Arab states (United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Qatar) South Asia (India), and Central Asia (Kazakhstan).

This course has been approved to count toward the Environmental Studies major.
Learn more about which track >


This course has been approved by Architectural Studies to count for major credit.

Sarah Moser has lived in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore and is interested in the process of nation-building in Southeast Asia and the Muslim world, especially in the use of master planned cities. She is currently finishing a book called New Cities in the Muslim World. She is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Comparative Urban Studies at the Center for Urban and Global Studies at Trinity College. Prior to this, she was a postdoctoral fellow in the Architecture Department at MIT. She holds a PhD in Cultural Geography from MIT.


EXP-0072-S: Controversial Art and Freedom of Speech
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04234
Thursday, 6:00-8:30PM, Olin 116

Would you like to know more about the often fiery debates surrounding controversial art--works that are being removed from an exhibition by authorities or have intentionally been damaged by outraged audiences?

This course offers students an opportunity to explore the sociocultural relationship between the arts and free speech law. Our emphasis is on contemporary American artists whose controversial works challenge assumptions about the social role of art in relation to aesthetic traditions, community standards, and the law. We also address controversies related to the exhibition of international works in American art spaces. Through guided research and analysis of recent art censorship cases and their historical precedents, students will examine the sociocultural forces that inform works by artists such as Shepard Fairey (his "Hope" poster of Barack Obama), "Dread" Scott Tyler (his art installation, What is the Proper Way to Display a U.S. Flag), Chris Ofili (his painting, The Holy Virgin Mary), Renee Cox (her photographic work), Yo Mama's Last Supper, and more.

This course has been approved by the Art and Art History department to count for Arts distribution credit.

Angelika Festa has spent many years exploring the relationships between art and everyday life, and between creative practices, social conventions, and public politics. She has worked as an adjunct faculty member in a number of colleges and universities and has also worked as an interdisciplinary artist, writer, and studio art instructor in both the United States and Canada. Angelika received her Doctoral ABD in Performance Studies from New York University.


EXP-0074-S: Sexuality, Gender, and the Law
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04235
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00PM, Olin 112

This course will begin with an introduction to Constitutional law and develop into an intimate study of the inner workings of the Supreme Court and its major decisions affecting sexual orientation, gender, and fundamental rights.

Taking a case-based approach, we will study the evolution of the federal Constitution and our legal system's stance on such topics as marriage and divorce, pornography, the right to privacy, sexual orientation, contraception, abortion, discrimination and gender issues. Debate and discussion regarding the historical evolution of these issues and their current trends will be emphasized.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course has been approved to count toward Women's Studies major credit.

Elizabeth Leahy is a Massachusetts licensed attorney and an adjunct professor in the Women and Gender Studies Department at Merrimack College, where she also sits on the Board of the Pre-Law Department. She has worked in varous areas of public interest law, including LGBTQ rights, nonprofit and public charities, and health care policy litigation. She is also the author and administrator of a successful feminist legal blog, FeministLawProf, which examines legal issues through the lens of feminism.


EXP-0076-S: Accused: The Gap between Law and Justice
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04236
Monday, 6:00-8:30PM, Eaton 333

The law is all around us and touches every facet of our lives, but what about justice? What is justice? What kind of justice are we entitled to?

This course will explore the concepts, framework, systems, and practices which comprise what justice is, with an emphasis on the perspective of the wrongfully accused. Through the use of drama, film, case studies, media analysis and other sources, students will consider the factors which shape our personal views of what justice is, decide how much our personal views matter and examine the many factors that determine how systems of justice impact society on various levels.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course has been approved by Peace and Justice Studies to count toward Core Option B: Justice.

Sonja Spears (J '86) is a retired elected judge with twelve years of service in the New Orleans judiciary. Despite her unblemished legal career, Sonja recently endured two years of intense scrutiny as the target of a federal criminal investigation. She was ultimately cleared without any charges being filed and the office in charge of her prosecution is currently facing questions of prosecutorial misconduct. Sonja received her JD from Tulane Law School.


EXP-0087-S: Microfinance: Financial Services for the Poor
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #04237
Monday, 6:00-8:30PM, Miner 112

What if you could give $25 to a business owner in an underdeveloped nation and the impact would be that they could feed, educate, and clothe their children for the next 10 months? Would you believe this is possible?

In the world of microfinance anything is possible and extraordinary results can be achieved.

In this course, we'll address how these achievements can be made and we'll take a comprehensive look at microfinance and its impact on people and societies. After forming a solid understanding of the various products offered under the microfinance umbrella (i.e., microcredit, microsavings, microinsurance), we'll collaborate to examine opportunities for domestic and international microfinance initiatives. Students will actively participate in the microfinance market by lending to an actual business owner of their choice, analyzing real-time case studies from around the globe and interacting with Boston-area microloan recipients.

This course is supported by the Experimental College's Distler Family Endowment, the aim of which is to provide students with courses that bridge the academy and the world of work.

This class has been approved by Entrepreneurial Leadership Studies to count as an elective toward the minor.

Adam Grenier has been a Fellow with Kiva.org, a leading online microfinance lending community whose mission is to connect people through lending for the sake of alleviating poverty. He also worked with Salone Microfinance Trust (SMT) in Sierra Leone, a non-governmental organization that serves the financial needs of over 5,300 economically active poor.


EXP-0096-S: Auditing for Breadth
0.5-1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading, Call #03934
ARR, no room needed

This program is intended to provide students with an opportunity to broaden their education by attending courses in which they might not otherwise enroll. With the approval of the instructors in question, students may elect to audit any three full-credit university courses (or the equivalent) during their four years as an undergraduate. (One course credit is awarded upon completion of the three audits.) Please note: graduating seniors may audit two courses and receive one-half credit.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0099-CS: Media Internships
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading, Call #03935
ARR, no room needed

Supervised internship in communications and mass media. Student can intern at a newspaper, magazine, book publishing company, film production company, television or radio station, advertising or public relations firm, or other media outlet approved by instructor. Students must intern a minimum of 150 hours during the semester (usually 12-16 hours a week), fulfill written assignments, and meet regularly with the instructor. Registration by consent of instructor. Student should consult with instructor prior to researching and applying for internships, and must submit an Internship Agreement signed by the internship site supervisor prior to being allowed to register.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For more information, contact the instructor, Leslie Goldberg at leslie.goldberg@tufts.edu.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Practice elective.

Leslie Goldberg (J '84) is the founder of Blue Sun Communications, a corporate communications consulting firm. She holds a M.S. in Mass Communication from Boston University.

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Courses Open Only to Designated Students


EXP-0041-S: Education for Active Citizenship
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #03920
Friday, 10:30AM-1:15PM, Rabb Room, Lincoln Filene
This course is specifically designed to prepare first year students for the Tisch Scholars Program. Only students who have been pre-selected for the E4AC program are permitted to enroll. In this course, students will begin to build a framework for civic engagement. Through selected readings, class discussions, guest speakers, and experiential work, students will think about how change is created in a community-based setting. In order to be effective as college student agents for change as well as lifelong active citizens, class members will study the relationships between Tufts University and its host communities. Students will become familiar with both historical and current issues facing these communities and ways in which Tufts students and community residents are making a difference.

Please Note: Only students who have been pre-selected for the E4AC program are permitted to enroll.

Dave Harker is a Doctoral Candidate and Teaching Fellow in the Sociology Department at Boston College. His primary research interests include political sociology, inequality, social movements, and civic engagement. Dave's dissertation work explores the ways in which long-term volunteers attach social and political meaning to their work.


EXP-0090-TS: Teaching Assistant Workshop
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #03930
ARR, no room needed

This course is designed to assist the undergraduates who are teaching assistants for courses in the Experimental College.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0091-AS: Inquiry Teaching Group
0.5 credit, Letter Grading, Call #03931
ARR, meeting at 96 Packard Ave

Inquiry is a global-issues simulation for high school students, and forms an integral part of the year's activities for EPIIC. Students in this course will help design and enact a simulation on Global Health, to be held during the Spring 2013 semester. In the process, students will mentor a high school delegation and prepare them for this simulation — helping them understand all the materials and issues involved.

Heather Barry is the Associate Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts.

Steve Cohen teaches in the Education department at Tufts.


EXP-0091-S: EPIIC: Global Health
1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #03932
Tuesday and Thursday, 3:00-5:30 PM, Crane Room

This course will be an intensive multifaceted, multidisciplinary probe into historical, scientific, socio-economic, political, philosophical and ethical dimensions of essential challenges and dilemmas of global health. In exploring perplexing and critical questions that shape the future of our world, of our societies, and of our species, we will examine the intersections of health and security and human rights in the broadest sense.

Please Note: This course is a continuation of the EPIIC class from last semester.

Sherman Teichman is Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts, and the founding director of EPIIC (Education for Public Inquiry and International Citizenship). He holds an M.A. from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.


EXP-0097-S: Quidnunc: Build Nicaragua
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail Grading, Call #
Tuesday, 8:00-9:15PM, Anderson 208


EXP-0101-CS: Advanced Filmmaking
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #03936
ARR, no room needed

Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who have completed EXP-0056-CS: Making Movies – or who are able to demonstrate equivalent competence - can continue their training as filmmakers. Students who initially qualify will present a business plan for their project and, if accepted, will receive credit, access to TuftsFilmWorks'production and editing equipment, and a supervised context within which to work. In return, they agree to watch a negotiated number of source films, keep a Producer's Log and write a final assessment, taking into account both the process they went through to produce their film and their reaction to the film once it's done.

This course counts as a Media Practice elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor, as a Film Practice elective for the Film Studies minor, and Media Practice credit for the Multimedia Arts minor.

Howard Woolf is Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks, co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.


EXP-0102-CS: Advanced Electronic and Digital Media
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #03937
ARR, no room needed

Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who are able to demonstrate an appropriate degree of competence can continue their training in the multimedia arts.

This course will count toward Media Practice credit for the Multimedia Arts minor and for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Howard Woolf is Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks, co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.


EXP-0192-PS: Independent Study
0.5-1.0 credit, Pass/Fail Grading, Call #03939
ARR, no room needed

By arrangement only. For more information, come by the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Avenue, or call x73384.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0192-S: Independent Study
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #03938
ARR, no room needed

By arrangement only. For more information, come by the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Avenue, or call x73384.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0194-CS: CMS Senior Project
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter Grading, Call #03941
ARR, no room needed

All CMS minors completing their Senior Projects this semester must register for this class.

Julie Dobrow is Director of the Communications and Media Studies and the Media and Public Service programs at Tufts. She holds a Ph.D. in Communications from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania.