Courses

Summer 2012 Courses


First Summer Session


EXP-0052-A: Public Relations and Marketing: Unraveling the Spin
1.0 credit, Letter-graded.
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00-9:30 PM
Olin 321


Public relations and marketing are critical specialties in modern commercial, entrepreneurial, and service enterprises. Creating demand for a product, service, or candidate involves understanding and molding our desires to generate particular outcomes; for example, a purchase or a vote. We need laundry detergent, but how do we choose one from among hundreds of brands? What makes Apple products more attractive to young consumers than other electronic devices in the marketplace? Can the same forces that determine what we wear also influence how we vote? The answer to these questions can be found in the theories and practices of today's marketing & public relations professionals.

Foundational and current readings in the field and case-studies will support our analysis of numerous examples from the industry. This course will take a look "behind the curtain" of our media saturated environment to recognize the strategies and tactics marketers and PR specialists use to persuade us. Further, we'll try to use the techniques for our own purposes. Students will form teams to produce a marketing communications plan that promotes a product, person, or idea. Guest speakers will share experiences and insights from the field.

Gail Bambrick is Senior Marketing Communications Writer at Tufts. She uses the written word and strategic planning to focus Tufts' identity and messaging in online, print and web communications. She has also been Director of Publications and Associate Director of Communications and Public Relations for the university as well as the News Media and Public Relations Manager for the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. She holds a Ph.D. from Tufts University in American literature.


EXP-0088-A: Understanding the Stock Market: History, Structure, and Impact
1.0 credit, Letter-graded.
Monday and Wednesday, 6:00-9:30 PM
Anderson 309


In the 90s, the sky was the limit. NASDAQ was making the mainstream NYSE look old and tired. Then in 2000 the Internet "bubble" hit, and a lot of "experts" lost their shirt and the shirts of thousands who invested their mutual funds. Does anybody really know what makes the stock market tick? In this course, students will begin to develop an understanding of the fundamentals of stock market investing, doing so within the realm of larger social, demographic, political, and economic contexts. Beginning with a brief historical overview, we will attempt to assess the significance of such key years as 1929, 1973 and 1987. We will then move to a discussion of the unprecedented change that the market has undergone during the last fifteen years. Major themes include the globalization of investing, the relationship between Social Security and the market, socially responsible investing, the critical role that interest rates play, the impact of technology, and the mutual fund explosion, the fallout 9/11, and the recent spate of corporate scandals. Finally, special attention will be paid to the role that stockbrokers play in the investment process.

Timothy Stratford has had over twenty years of experience as a financial services professional at brokerage houses such as Shearson Lehman Brothers and Smith Barney Harris and Upham.

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Second Summer Session


EXP-0007-B. Hindu Yoga and Buddhist Meditation
1.0 Credit, Letter-graded.
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00-9:30 PM


This course seeks to present a clear-eyed look at the teachings of two great spiritual traditions. We will undertake our investigation from both traditional and contemporary perspectives. In doing so, we will read such ancient texts as Patanjali's Yoga Sutras and such modern ones as Jack Kornfield's A Path with Heart. Parallel to the readings, we will practice yoga and meditation techniques weekly in class. In exploring the interface between practice and theory, students will be expected to write papers, keep a meditation journal, actively participate in class discussion, and keep up with their yoga and meditation outside the classroom.

Matthew Daniell has lived in Asia for many years, studying yoga and Buddhism firsthand from teachers and monks. A Tufts graduate (A '85), Matthew asked himself during his senior year if there wasn't more to life. This question led him on a spiritual journey that took him to Japan, Thailand, and India.

Ravi Nathwani has also studied and lived in Asia, residing with a Buddhist community in Japan. Ravi is certified in the Sirvananda yoga tradition and has training in the Ashtanga, Kripalu and Iyengar methods of yoga.

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12-Week Session


EXP-0099-CA: Media Internships
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail.

With the approval of the instructor, students can arrange a supervised internship at a newspaper, magazine, book publishing company, film production company, television or radio station, advertising or public relations firm, or other media outlet. Students must intern a minimum of 150 hours during the semester (usually 12-16 hrs/wk), fulfill written assignments, and meet regularly with the instructor. PLEASE NOTE: Students should consult with the instructor prior to researching and applying for internships, and must submit an Internship Agreement signed by the internship site supervisor prior to being allowed to register. Contact Susan Eisenhauer for more information. (susan.eisenhauer@tufts.edu, x72007)

Susan Eisenhauer (J '71) holds a M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Among other responsibilities, she directs the Communications internship program, supervising more than 90 students each year who intern for credit at various media organizations.


EXP-0099-CB: Media Internships
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail.

With the approval of the instructor, students can arrange a supervised internship at a newspaper, magazine, book publishing company, film production company, television or radio station, advertising or public relations firm, or other media outlet. Students must intern a minimum of 150 hours during the semester (usually 12-16 hrs/wk), fulfill written assignments, and meet regularly with the instructor. PLEASE NOTE: Students should consult with the instructor prior to researching and applying for internships, and must submit an Internship Agreement signed by the internship site supervisor prior to being allowed to register. Contact Susan Eisenhauer for more information. (susan.eisenhauer@tufts.edu,  x72007)

Susan Eisenhauer (J '71) holds a M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Among other responsibilities, she directs the Communications internship program, supervising more than 90 students each year who intern for credit at various media organizations.