Courses

Spring 2012 Courses

Registration for these courses will take place on SIS Online and will begin at 9:00am on the first day of Spring classes, Thursday, January 19. Registration will continue for open courses until 5pm on Thursday, February 2. This page was last updated 02/13/12. Please check back for updates, as we are still awaiting some approvals for courses to count toward program, major, or distribution credit. We will also post preliminary syllabi as we receive them from instructors.


Courses Open to All Students


EXP-0001-S: American Superheroes: Power, Politics, and Morality
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04814
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Bromfield-Pearson 07

The superhero has been a part of American culture since 1938, but in recent years its prominence has grown tremendously thanks to the genre's proliferation in film, on television, and even in traditional fiction. What does the new-found popularity of superhero narratives tell us about American society at the beginning of the 21st century? What can the evolution of the genre tell us about the ways in which American ideas about power, politics, morality, and heroism have changed over the last seventy-three years? This course will offer students a hands-on approach to the genre through in-depth analysis of prominent graphic novels, films, and traditional fiction. Through a research project, students will use a specific example or element of the genre to come to a greater understanding of how the superhero story reflects and perhaps even shapes the broader American culture.
View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Matthew Pustz is the author of Comic Book Culture: Fanboys and True Believers and the editor of Comic Books and American Cultural History (forthcoming). He is currently teaching American history and popular culture at Endicott College and Fitchburg State University and holds a PhD in American Studies from the University of Iowa.


EXP-0002-S: Queer New York: History and Subculture in the Big Apple
This course has been cancelled due to low enrollment.
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04815
Thursday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 203

Despite the widespread belief that queer sexualities were invisible until the Stonewall riots in 1969, throughout the history of the United States New York City has stood out as a national epicenter for sexual counter-cultural movements. In this course, we will explore the breadth of this history: from the Harlem Renaissance to 20th century feminist movements, avant-garde/traditionalist art debates, and responses to Cold War anti-communism. One ongoing strand in the course will be a consideration of Times Square as a microcosm for how sexualities augment and challenge our understanding of a broad range of twentieth-century social movements. We will also examine a diverse selection of queer cultural histories while offering, as well, concrete methodological examples (both useful and cautionary) that students might apply to future academic work.

This course has been approved by the Women's Studies program to count toward major credit.

Matthew Nelson is an instructor in the English department at Tufts and is an advanced PhD candidate in the department as well. He recently gave a paper at the Robert Lowell Society Colloquium of the ALA on the complications of sexuality in Lowell's poetry.


EXP-0003-S: The Origins of Religion
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04816
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 203

What is religion? Why is it such an important and universal feature of human culture? In this class, we will examine and evaluate the material culture of prehistoric religion, its interpretation, and current theories of religion and human origins. How has human evolution created the conditions for religious experience and forms of social organization? What role might religion have played in early Homo sapien development? The class content should help us understand why religion seems to be tied so deeply to what is fundamental to our humanity, and gain a perspective for evaluating the 'place' of religion in human life.
View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Paul Cassell is an instructor at Boston University, has been a researcher in the Cognitive Science Laboratory there, and is an advanced PhD candidate in the Science, Philosophy, and Religion program at Boston University. His dissertation is A Semiotic and Emergent Theory of Religious Communities.


EXP-0004-S: Healing the World: Jewish Traditions of Social Justice
This course has been cancelled due to low enrollment.
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04817
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 112

Do social justice movements need a spiritual dimension? How has the legacy of the Jewish prophets challenged the question of what it means to be Jewish? In this course we will consider the impacts of the prophetic and messianic tradition in Judaism, especially as they relate to particular movements for social justice. Both the philosophical and practical aspects of such movements will be explored, with specific attention paid to their roots in Jewish texts and tradition. Ultimately, students will gain insight into the questions that arise when applying Jewish thought to contemporary issues.

This course is supported by the Goldner Family Fund, in conjunction with Judaic Studies and the Experimental College.

This course has been approved by the Judaic Studies program to count toward either major or minor credit.

Pamela Greenberg has been involved in a number of social justice movements, from the anti-apartheid movement to protesting nuclear weapons to working with the Laundry Workers Union (while a student at Tufts). Her book, The Complete Psalms: The Book of Prayer Songs in a New Translation, is forthcoming from Bloomsbury Press. She holds an MFA in poetry from Syracuse University and a MA in Jewish Studies from Hebrew College.


EXP-0005-S: Gaga's Holy Monsters
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04818
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00-7:15 PM, Bromfield-Pearson 05

Through in-depth analysis of her musical, textual and visual aesthetics, this course will explore Lady Gaga's work as represented mainly by her music videos in relation to the implications for gender and sexuality. This course will investigate how her work draws on Christian ideas and practices to frame her commentary on issues of gender and sexuality, and how such appropriations may yield positive and/or negative effects.

Emmanuel Hernandez is a senior at Tufts University working towards a double major in Religion and Music. He has developed an approach to balancing high theory with practical application by writing and presenting on popular music icons such as Lady Gaga and Rihanna within the context of queer theory.


EXP-0006-S: Medical Spanish
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04819
Monday and Wednesday, 6:00-7:15 PM, Lane 100

This course provides an overview of the practice of Spanish-language medical interpretation. Students will build their skills in communication, ethics, and medical vocabulary, including psychology and psychiatry, while exploring questions of culture and advocacy. This course offers students an opportunity to practice interpretation in a simulated medical setting by emphasizing the following areas: bilingual fluency for social and medical conversation; interpreting skills and techniques; the code of ethics for medical interpreters (in relation to that of doctors); health beliefs and practices in a range of Spanish-speaking cultures; and cross-cultural communications challenges in the medical setting. Instruction is geared toward students with intermediate to advanced language skills, and will reinforce students' prior knowledge of Spanish grammar. This course will be taught in Spanish.

Josep Vicente is currently a medical interpreter at Massachusetts General Hospital. Born and raised in Spain, he holds a degree in Romance Languages and Linguistics from the Universitat de Barcelona.


EXP-0014-S: Dark Comedy on the Page, Stage, and Screen
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04820
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Tisch 310

Horace is believed to have posed the question, "What prevents him who says the truth from laughing?" What happens, then, if the truth is painful? Do we still laugh? In his essay, "The Tragic Theatre," William Butler Yeats wrote, "tragedy must always be a drowning and breaking of the dykes that separate man from man, and...It is upon these dykes comedy keeps house." Indeed, the world of comedy is often an inherently tragic one, made comic by a microscopic twist in the circumstance or outcome. This course will examine the interplay between comedy and suffering in a number of areas, taking examples from theatre, film, television, stand-up comedy, and literature. Using cultural, political, and social critique to examine the historical background of a select number of difficult moments in history, students will explore the ways in which comedians -- from Aristophanes to Dave Chappelle -- have used humor as means of coping and survival. This humor often takes the shape of "dark comedy", but may more accurately be described as "the comedy of the suffering." Topics will range from the personal, such as the comedy of heartbreak, to the global, with comic responses to the atrocities of World War II, in an attempt to understand both why comedy is such a powerful tool of survival, as well as how we see it at play in our lives today.

This course counts as a Humanities and Arts elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor and a Film Criticism elective for the Film Studies minor.

This class has been approved by the Department of Drama and Dance to count toward the Arts distribution requirement.

A.J. Knox has written and presented on such disparate but nonetheless central figures and motives in the history of comedy as Alfred Jarry, Richard Pryor, and the Black Arts Movement. He is currently a PhD candidate in the Drama Department at Tufts. His research interests include "Pataphysics," Buddhism in Western theater, and comedy studies.


EXP-0015-S: The Global Business of American Theatre
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04821
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Lane 100A

Why did the Broadway musical Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark reportedly cost more than $60 million to produce? And why would anyone invest that much in a theatrical production? This course provides a foundation to analyze the business of American theatre from community theatre, to Broadway, to national and international tours. Students will learn the roles played by producers, performers, designers, unions, investors, corporations, theater owners, tour booking companies, directors, lawyers, and state and local governments, among others, in the development, production, performance, and distribution of live theatrical events. Drawing largely on the theatrical activity of Disney, we will explore the tensions between business and art in show business. We will also have professional theatre industry guest speakers with experiences ranging from Broadway Russia, Las Vegas, and China.

This class has been approved by the Department of Drama and Dance to count toward the Arts distribution requirement.

Michael Morris has more than twenty years of arts experience as a producer, director, and performer in professional and amateur theater, opera, and dance, and is a member of the Actors' Equity Association and the American Guild of Musical Artists. Having presented his theatre research at national and international conferences, he is currently a PhD student in the Drama department at Tufts.


EXP-0016-S: Art as Awareness: A Think Tank for the 21st Century
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04822
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 113

We live in a new time. Meaning and form for the arts have become uncertain. What do we applaud, and for what reasons? Do the arts have a real place in our current lives? What purpose can they serve? This course will serve as a think tank on the arts today in order to critically research, review and formulate roles and potential for the arts in the context of the 21st century social challenges. Students will have an opportunity to collectively diagnose the contour of our present times through international media, press and video-conferencing with major artists from all over the globe. The course will be a chance to acquire skills in critical discourse and entrepreneurial thinking.

This course has been approved by the Art and Art History Department to count toward Arts Distribution credit.

Moises Fernandez Via has created innovative performing projects in collaboration with such acclaimed artists as Iranian filmmaker Abbas Kiarostami, Finnish composer Einojuhani Rautavaara, French painter Daniel Enkaoua, and American painter Caio Fonseca, among others. He is currently an Interdisciplinary Academic Innovation Consultant at the Boston University College of Fine Arts, as well as an internationally active concert pianist. He holds a MA from the University Mozarteum in Salzburg, and has done post-grad work at the Muchmann-Mehta School of Music in Tel Aviv and at Boston University.


EXP-0019-S: Research for Success: Using the Library for Thesis and Capstone Projects
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04774
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Tisch 223

Are you thinking about writing an honors thesis your senior year? Would you like to get a head start or immediate help understanding the research process? Would you enjoy sharing what you learn as you become an expert in the subject area you are investigating? This course will introduce students to the major research tools and techniques at an intermediate-to-advanced level specific to their subject area. Each student will also develop a working bibliography of resources, as well as a plan for continuing his/her research.
View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >
View a video introduction to this course >

PLEASE NOTE: This is an eight-week course.

Regina Raboin is the Science Reference Librarian and Reference Microforms/Current Periodicals Coordinator at Tisch Library.

Laurie Sabol is the Coordinator of Library Instruction at Tisch Library.


EXP-0021-S: Cardiovascular Healthcare in the 21st Century
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04823
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:30-7:45 PM, Jackson 06

Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death in the US and around the world. This course introduces undergraduates to facets of biomedical technology and the scientific rigor that are necessary in approaching modern cardiovascular medicine. The class will focus on the complex issues involved in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of the disease. Particular emphasis will be placed on exploring the interdisciplinary collaboration of engineers, scientists, and clinicians. Ultimately, students will have a working understanding of cardiovascular medicine and technology, both as how they relate to their future health and as a key 21st century profession.

Samuel Senyo is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Cardiovascular Division of Brigham and Women's Hospital. He holds a PhD in Bioengineering from the University of Illinois at Chicago, where he studied cardiac mechanotransduction and cell growth (hypertrophy).

Gregory Fomovsky is a Research Fellow in the Cardiovascular Bioengineering Lab at Brigham and Women's Hospital. He holds a PhD in Biomedical Engineering from Columbia University, where he studied cardiac biomechanics and myocardial infarction.


EXP-0022-S: The A to Z of Drug Discovery
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04824
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 107

Have you ever wondered how new drugs are discovered? This course will introduce students to the field of medicinal chemistry. We will focus on the design and discovery of new compounds and therapeutic chemicals that are suitable for development into useful medicines in humans. Topics for discussion with each drug will include the mechanism of action, medicinal chemistry, pre-clinical development, clinical use, social impact, and new approaches in the same therapeutic class. In particular, the key personalities and the stories behind the discovery of each drug will be highlighted. The class will also participate in the MeduMaZe board game Drug Development and Approval, which represents a simulation of the entire medicine development process. Students will be exposed to realistic scientific events that may slow down or speed up drug development, which frequently stimulates dialogue, learning, and laughter (see http://www.medumaze.com/index.html).
View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Kevin Hodgetts contributed to two compounds that advanced to human clinical trials (NGD-8243 a TRPV1 antagonist in phase II for pain and NGN-4715 an MCH antagonist that reached phase I for obesity). He is a medicinal chemist leading a drug discovery project on novel treatments for schizophrenia at Galenea Corporation in Cambridge. Before that, he worked for ten years at Neurogen Corporation in Branford, CT working in a number of therapeutic areas including anxiety, depression, pain, and inflammation. He trained as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Texas at Austin and holds a PhD in Organic Chemistry from the University of Salford, U.K.


EXP-0023-S: Combating Infectious Disease
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04825
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00-7:15 PM, Lane 100A

Malaria. Dengue. Cholera. Why have these dreaded diseases not been eradicated long ago? This course is geared towards developing interdisciplinary solutions to the complex problems associated with combating infectious diseases. And we will use these three as our case studies. The identification of transmission pathways, the development of the tools necessary for disease intervention, and the implementation of health interventions comprise the three learning modules of the course. Six guest lecturers - forerunners in the fields of infectious disease, water resources, engineering, epidemiology, statistics, and intervention implementation - will provide examples of applying classroom theory to real-world problems. Through the core assignment - in which interdisciplinary teams will design an intervention and implementation strategy for one of the three aforementioned diseases - students will be encouraged to embrace the specialized skills of their own disciplines while learning how to communicate and collaborate with others.

Maimuna (Maia) Majumder is at work on a combined undergraduate/graduate degree at Tufts. She is a senior in the School of Engineering and is pursuing a MS at the School of Medicine (BS 2012/MPH 2013). Her research interests include the identification and implementation of cholera interventions in Bangladesh as well as prediction modeling of malaria and dengue.


EXP-0024-S: Grief and Loss During the College Years
This course has been cancelled due to low enrollment.
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04826
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 318

What is it like to grieve a recent loss on a Thursday night in the dorm when everyone else is partying? How does one decide whether to stay in school or take a leave of absence if a parent is struggling with a serious or life-threatening illness? What losses do college students experience that may not even be recognized or valued? This course examines major theories of bereavement care and applies these theories to understanding grief and loss during the college years. We will explore both the expected and the complicated responses to major types of loss. In addition, we will seek to understand institutional and societal responses to grief.
View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course has been approved by the Psychology department to count toward Social Science distribution credit.

Paul Thayer is an Associate Professor of Education and Child Life at Wheelock College and Chair of the Department of Child Life and Family Studies. He has a MA in Psychology from Assumption College, a MDiv from Yale University, and a Doctor of Ministry from Boston University.


EXP-0027-S: Bioethics: Contemporary Perspectives
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04827
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 318

"To what extent should medical technology intervene with nature?" Reproductive ethics, palliative care, euthanasia, and human experimentation will be explored in this course as we try to answer this difficult question. We will analyze the role of bioethics in such cases as that of Terri Schiavo. Then we will move into a larger discussion of bioethics as an increasingly important and contested field encompassing our lives. Finally, we will look at bioethics as the ground for an expanding debate about what it means to be human, as technology moves medical possibility into realms never imagined before.
View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Cristina Richie teaches Ethics and World Religions at Newbury College and at UMass/Boston. She has published widely on contemporary ethical controversies and holds a MDiv from the Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary


EXP-0029-S: Game Strategy
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04828
Monday and Wednesday, 6:00-7:15 PM, East 015

When playing Monopoly Scrabble or Clue, do you just go by the rules? Or have you ever thought about the strategy that's involved? This course will explore the skills and understanding that's necessary to actually win common household games. We will focus on the strategy implemented in these games by employing game theory, economics, statistics, and balance of power dynamics. Classes will consist of an examination of a certain strategic element within the context of a game, and then the exercising of that strategy in class by playing the game in question. Games explored will include students' choices along with the following: Texas Hold'em, Risk, Monopoly, Settlers of Catan, Dominion, Hearts, Spades, President, Bridge, Connect 4, Checkers, Chinese Checkers, Chess, Scrabble.

Aaron Bartel is a senior majoring in Economics at Tufts. He had the entire game of Monopoly memorized when he was 5, and in his earlier years he was a chess prodigy.


EXP-0030-S: Sabermetrics 101: The Objective Analysis of Baseball
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04829
Thursday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Anderson 309

This course will teach the fundamentals of the emerging science of Sabermetrics, the objective analysis of baseball. In addition, and where appropriate, we will explore the science of baseball scouting. We will discuss baseball not through conventional wisdom and consensus, but by searching for knowledge concerning the game of baseball. Hitting, pitching, fielding performance, along with other areas of sabermetrics, will be analyzed and better understood with current and historical baseball data. Students will design and implement their own sabermetric research study, learning the important concepts in statistical analysis needed to perform this research.

Andy Andres, PhD (N '99) is an Assistant Professor of Natural Science at Boston University, a Data Analyst at BaseballHQ.com, and a die-hard Red Sox fan.


EXP-0031-S: American Wilderness
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04830
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Bromfield-Pearson 07

What is wilderness? Is the presence of wilderness essential for the many millions who will never venture into the mountains or plunge into canyons beyond where pavement ends and backcountry begins? How have American attitudes toward nature shifted during the course of our nation's history and how have these attitudes shaped both public policy and the landscape itself? In this class we will examine (through literature, scholarship, and art) the relationship that early settlers established with the landscape they so desperately aimed to cultivate. We will then look at how explorers, fortune seekers, philosophers, industrialists, writers, and mountain walkers qualify the American wilderness in a variety of ways: to some it is acres of harvestable timber and agricultural land, to others, the manifestation of the sublime and "the preservation of the world." In addition, we will be tracing the evolution of environmental politics in the United States, against the backdrop of conservation and environmentalism. Our work in this regard will culminate with an in-depth study of the Wilderness Act of 1964 and its implications for land management policy over the last five decades.

The Environmental Studies program has approved this course to count toward Track III-Environment and Society.

Andrew Turchon has worked in conservation and management for the Appalachian Mountain Club as a backcountry caretaker and educator in the White Mountain National Forest, and is a certified Wilderness First Responder and former hiking guide for Eastern Mountain Sports. He teaches in the Revere Public School system and holds an M.A.T. from Tufts.


EXP-0032-S: The Changing Taste of Place: Sensory Ethnography and Boston Foodscapes
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04831
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 116

What is the role of food and related sensory experiences in shaping place and identity? How does this vary spatially and temporally? How do environmental, political, and socio-economic changes influence this relationship? What are implications for livelihoods and well-being? In this seminar and field-research based course, you will examine these questions on dynamic human-environment interactions through food within the framework of socio-ecological systems and global change studies. Readings and discussions will provide opportunity for critical analyses of place making, food procurement, climate change, land use, resource management, policy and livelihoods. Classroom dialogue will further draw from student experiences and perceptions. You will be guided through the practice of sensory ethnography in the Boston area. Field research, case studies, and tastings will offer examples in local context. This course will culminate in the cultivation of an aromatic healing plants greenroof garden and creation and dissemination of ethnographic documentaries and a cookbook that reflect on cultural, environmental, sensory, political, and socio-economic analyses.
View course brochure >

The Environmental Studies program has approved this course to count toward Track III-Environment and Society.

Selena Ahmed is a NIH TEACRS (Training in Education and Critical Research Skills) Postdoctoral Fellow at Tufts University where she is co-leading a project on the impact of climate change on tea chemistry and taste and associated farmer perceptions and adaptations. Her research and teaching interests in food and medicinal plant systems have taken her from forest-dwelling communities in the Venezuelan Amazon, Indian Himalaya, Belize, Dominican Republic, Anti-Atlas Mountains of Morocco and the uplands of China's Yunnan Province to local urban kitchens and farms.

Ellen Arnstein is an artist, bookmaker, and an antiquarian book appraiser and buyer at Brattle Street Book Shop with interests in cookbooks, food festivals, role of social media in urban food movements, and the sociability and ritual of eating. She is an active member of the organizing committee of Somerville's HONK! Festival, a food blogger and avid home cook, and previously worked at the Massachusetts Cultural Council on folk art and heritage. She holds a BFA from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in association with Tufts University.


EXP-0033-S: Campus Community Emergency Response Team
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04832
Wednesday, 1:00-3:00 PM, Sophia Gordon Multi-purpose Room

The C-CERT course provides students with the skills required by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to serve as a Community Emergency Response Team member within their campus community. Completion of this training will provide the student with the basic skills they may need in the aftermath of a disaster or other emergency and the opportunity to assist the Tufts Community and the Department of Public Safety by joining Tufts C-CERT. By working together, C-CERT members can assist in saving lives and protecting property using the skills gained in this course. This course meets FEMA and Emergency Management Institute (EMI) requirements for CERT training.

Mark Roche is a Corporal with the Tufts University Police Department and a certified CERT Instructor. He also serves as a CERT Team Leader and Operations Captain with a local Emergency Management agency. He is currently an instructor for the Experimental College teaching the Rape Aggression Defense for Women and Advanced Rape Aggression Defense courses.


EXP-0034-S: RAD for Men: Crossing Aggression with Defense
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04833
Wednesday, 4:30-6:30 PM, Sophia Gordon Multi-purpose Room

Providing "responsible information" about self defense training to men may not be what they are in fact looking for. Some attendees will be seeking a program that will teach them how to fight, bully or exact revenge on previously committed wrongs. This however could not be farther from our program's focus of self defense. In addition, "tactical options" of avoidance and disengagement are in fact responsible and successful the vast majority of the time, because men are generally not assaulted simply because they are men, as women often are. Most men (not all) "find themselves in confrontational situations" often as a result of their own choices and removing themselves from these situations is usually very easy when pride, anger, and ego are not factors.

Luis Santamaria is a Corporal at the Tufts University Police Department. He has been teaching RAD for women over the last four years and RAD for men over the last two years. He has attended the certification for both programs and successfully completed the requirements. He holds a MA in Criminal Justice Administration from Western New England University.


EXP-0035-AS: Rape Aggression Defense for Women
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04835
Monday, 4:30-6:30 PM, Sophia Gordon MP Room

The Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.) is based on the philosophy of choices: "to develop and enhance the OPTIONS of self defense, so that they become more viable considerations for the woman who is attacked." While it is completely natural to resist, unless a woman is trained to do so the resistance she attempts may be futile. This course will try to strengthen innate survival techniques by making more options available. Preparation through education and training is usually the best way to survive an assault situation. Issues that will be addressed include awareness and prevention, sexual assault definitions, patterns of encounter, the decision to resist, basic principles of self-defense, and the defensive mindset. This course will end with realistic simulation training.

Mark Roche and Kerri Dervishian are members of the Tufts University Police Department and certified R.A.D. instructors.


EXP-0035-BS: Rape Aggression Defense for Women
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04836
Thursday, 4:30-6:30 PM, Sophia Gordon MP Room

The Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.) is based on the philosophy of choices: "to develop and enhance the OPTIONS of self defense, so that they become more viable considerations for the woman who is attacked." While it is completely natural to resist, unless a woman is trained to do so the resistance she attempts may be futile. This course will try to strengthen innate survival techniques by making more options available. Preparation through education and training is usually the best way to survive an assault situation. Issues that will be addressed include awareness and prevention, sexual assault definitions, patterns of encounter, the decision to resist, basic principles of self-defense, and the defensive mindset. This course will end with realistic simulation training.

Darren Weisse is a member of the Tufts University Police Department and a certified R.A.D. instructor.


EXP-0036-S: Advanced Rape Aggression Defense
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04859
Tuesday, 4:30-6:30 PM, Sophia Gordon MP Room

Advanced Rape Aggression Defense (Advanced RAD) is a continuation of the Basic program and answers a lot of the "what if" questions. The program will begin with a review of the basic program followed by simulation. This course is more hands on than the basic program and includes topics such as defending against multiple attackers and defense against weapons such as knives and guns. Throughout the course, the instructors will conduct realistic simulation training using impact targets and facilitate discussions on sexual assault, crime prevention and personal protection.

Prerequisite: completion of the basic RAD course

Mark Roche and Kerri Dervishian are members of the Tufts University Police Department and certified R.A.D. instructors.


EXP-0037-S: Gay and Lesbian Movements: Assimilation, Liberation, and the Rise of Identity Politics
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04838
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Tisch 310

Will GLBT people ever be able to achieve genuine equality with the rest of America? Throughout its relatively short history, the gay and lesbian movement in the United States has endured searing internal conflicts over whether to embrace assimilationist or liberationist strategies. This ideological struggle between these two positions has been a source of bitter resentment and division from its revolutionary inception, essentially destroying any sense of political unity and now "virtual equality" seems to represent the limits of mainstreaming. "Virtual equality" means that GLBT people enjoy access to power, but no real power; can pay taxes, but not expect the government to protect them; can be visible, but vulnerable to discrimination and violence. From this long struggle came identity politics. Using texts, law, politics, history, psychology, religion, films, theater, and literature, this inter-disciplinary course will historically explore the struggles that challenged, shaped, defined and ultimately determined the direction the gay and lesbian social movement would take and its current consequences.

This class has been approved by the History Department to count toward the Humanities distribution requirement.

It has also been approved by the Women's Studies program to count toward major credit.

Bert Ouelette was doing his pastoral care residency at St. Vincent's Hospital in New York during the early and mid-eighties when AIDS was devastating the gay male community. A few years later he wrote his doctoral dissertation on the life span of social movements using gay and lesbian movements as an example, and he has conducted over eighty interviews with people who have lived the history. He is an Adjunct Professor of Psychology at Emmanuel College and has two Masters degrees from Boston College (one in Comparative Literature and the other in Developmental Psychology) and a PhD in Law, Policy and Society from Northeastern University.


EXP-0039-S: Planned Cities: Power, Ideology, and Identity
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04839
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Anderson 312

This course examines the origins and design of planned cities from around the world and spanning thousands of years. We will begin with the earliest examples of urban planning in the Indus Valley and advance all the way to cities currently under construction in Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. A variety of themes will be explored including the "Garden City Movement," colonial and postcolonial cities, totalitarianism and the city, utopianism, "green" cities, and "creative" cities. We will examine the various motivations underlying the design and construction of planned cities and how they are shaped by power, religion, and political ideologies. This course will also investigate the evolving concepts used in city design as well as the continuities in city features such as the grid and the axis that span centuries and even millennia. Students interested in cities, architecture and planning in different cultural contexts will benefit from an exploration of these special places.

This class has been approved by the Architectural Studies Program to count as a Social Science/Humanities elective.

Sarah Moser has lived in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore and is interested in the process of nation-building in Southeast Asia and the Muslim world, especially in the use of master planned cities. She is currently finishing a book called New Cities in the Muslim World. She is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Comparative Urban Studies at the Center for Urban and Global Studies at Trinity College. In 2008-2009, Sarah was a postdoctoral fellow in the Architecture Department at MIT and holds a PhD in Cultural Geography.


EXP-0040-S: The Ethics of Sport
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04840
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 321

Should baseball players who used steroids be allowed in the Baseball Hall of Fame? Should Michael Vick have been allowed to play in the NFL after going to jail for being involved in dog fighting? This course will broaden students'awareness of the wide scope of ethical challenges in the sports world, in particular by testing the strengths and weaknesses of different moral theories and ethical arguments. Sports will be used as a lense to help students understand general normative ethical theories, principles and virtues, including Deontology, Utilitarianism, Consequentialism, Teleological Ethics, Natural Law, Contractarianism, the Justice Approach, Virtue Approach, Health Care Principles, the right and the good. The course will strengthen students'comfort and experience in discussing ethical issues in the sports world with less emotion and a firmer ethical foundation. Topics include history of sports, fair play, ethical scandal, drugs, steroids, violence, sports media, and cheating.

Carolyn Jones until recently relocating to the Greater Boston area taught Ethics in the Philosophy Department at Purdue University/Calumet. She is a lifelong sports fan who enjoys baseball, football, basketball, and tennis, and is also an avid cyclist who has been disappointed by the ethical issues raised about cycling and cyclists such as Tyler Hamilton, Floyd Landis, and Alexandre Vinokourov. She holds a MDiv from the Episcopal Divinity School in Cambridge, MA and has done additional post-grad work at the Weston School of Theology and the University of Chicago Graduate School of Business.


EXP-0043-S: Human Rights and Climate Change
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04841
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 321

How do human rights intersect with climate change issues? How is climate change effecting human societies, cultures and daily life? Where do international human rights law and international environmental law overlap? What is meant by the term "climate justice"? This course will explore climate change and related environmental issues through the lens of human rights. Students will analyze the linkages between these issues by examining the debates concerning every individual's right to health, food, housing, livelihood, natural resources and participation in political life. We will study such groups as indigenous people, refugees, women, children, farmers, and general agricultural workers many "communities" and the manner in which climate change is imposing upon their human rights. Finally, students in the class will develop an awareness of international legal issues regarding human rights and environmental contexts.
View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

The Environmental Studies program has approved this course to count toward Track III-Environment and Society.

Jenna DiCocco is an attorney, teacher and human rights advocate. She is a Visiting Scholar at Northeastern University's Women's Gender & Sexuality Studies Program where she is researching the gendered application of certain criminal law mitigation factors in spousal murder cases. She also writes and publishes the weekly Human Rights RoundUp, a news aggregation blog highlighting current global human rights issues. She has been a corporate contract attorney, has directed an international women's human rights organization, and has served as a U.S. Peace Corps Volunteer in Zambia and as an AmeriCorps City Year Volunteer in Boston, Massachusetts. Ms. DiCocco received her Juris Doctor from University of Iowa, with a concentration on international human rights law.


EXP-0046-S: Experimenting with Philanthropy
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04842
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Tisch 314

Want to be an agent for community change? Wish you had money to give away to your favorite organization? Working with a grant from both the Learning by Giving Foundation and the Highland Street Foundation, students in this course will have the opportunity to be philanthropists by serving as a youth board to award $20,000 in funding to local nonprofits of their choosing. Students will learn about the different types of, and approaches to, philanthropic giving, as well as the key elements of effective nonprofit management and sustainability. Students will also have the opportunity to conduct their own community project.
View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course is supported by a grant from the Sunshine Lady Foundation's "Learning by Giving" program and a grant from the Highland Street Foundation.

Nancy Lippe is the Associate Director of Civic Schools, a local Boston effort to reconnect schools with their civic mission, and she has led youth programs in schools and communities for the last fifteen years, focusing on conflict resolution, family philanthropy, teen philanthropy and a college scholarship and mentoring program. Prior to moving to Boston, she worked as a program officer for a small community foundation in the San Francisco Bay Area, promoting youth programs, local philanthropy and connecting donors with local programs. Her work has involved being both a grant seeker and a grant maker, resulting in a great appreciation for the opportunities and challenges of both sides. She holds a doctorate in education from the Fielding Graduate University.


EXP-0050-CS: Media Literacy
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04776
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Braker 118

In a media-saturated world, endless possibilities exist for what we can watch, read, listen to, and create. Yet all too often the flood of images overwhelms us, paralyzes us, and shapes our perceptions of ourselves, others and the world. This class will focus on how we can deconstruct these images in order to use the media for positive social change, and avoid being used by it. We will examine media stereotypes of gender, ethnicity, race, and class, explore the role of the "citizen journalist," discuss the ways new media has changed the traditional media landscape, and think about the impact of media convergence and the ethical issues that arise when only a few corporations own the majority of news, entertainment, publishing, and internet outlets. Finally, by examining scholarly research, film clips, TV news and hearing guest speakers, we will focus on the importance of media literacy in our everyday lives, and how to use the media to become an active citizen.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Social Sciences elective.

Michelle J. Boyd is a doctoral student in the Child Development department at Tufts University and a graduate research assistant at both the Institute for Applied Research in Youth Development and Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service. Her professional goal is to better understand how media can be used to optimize positive youth development, especially civic development. Her current research focuses on the relations between news media use and youth civic cognitions, affects, and behaviors. Her work also promotes media literacy as an essential set of civic skills and as a means for empowering and encouraging active and engaged citizenship.


EXP-0051-CS: Advanced Narrative and Documentary Practice
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04843
ARR, 550 Boston Avenue

This course is a continuation of Introduction to Narrative and Documentary Practice taught last fall in the Experimental College. Each student will produce his or her proposed story under the individual guidance of the instructor. Student projects can employ a wide range of storytelling styles, including but not limited to investigative, historical, biographical, and autobiographical. They can address significant social, economic, political, and environmental issues, as well as capture and convey contemporary memory, life, and culture. The students will work closely with the instructor and other practitioners, constantly crafting and editing their projects and developing their own unique voice. Each project will be scrutinized for thorough and accurate research, original and ethically grounded reporting, and engaging storytelling. At the end of the semester, the stories will be published on the web. In addition, students will have regular opportunities to meet collectively, engage in peer review, and share stylistic and workflow strategies. While this course is designed as the logical next step for students who've completed the introductory level class in the fall, individuals who did not participate in the fall class may contact the instructor to determine whether or not they have the necessary preparation for joining this semester.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Practice elective.

Gary Knight is a renowned photojournalist whose work - from South East Asia to Yugoslavia to Iraq and Afghanistan - has been published, exhibited and honored around the world. He is a founding member of the VII Photo Agency, dispatches magazine, and the Angkor Photo Festival. He is currently the Tufts' Institute for Global Leadership's Exposure INSPIRE Fellow.

Samuel James is the Program Coordinator for the new Program for Narrative and Documentary Practice, housed in the Tufts University Institute for Global Leadership.


EXP-0052-S: Digital Storytelling: The Aesthetics and Practices of New Media
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04844
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Bromfield-Pearson 02

With the proliferation of digital technologies, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of ways individuals can tell their stories and distribute them. Digital comics, blogs, flash-based video games, Twitter feeds, YouTube videos, and audio podcasts have become the new norm for storytelling and personal expression. Digital Storytelling examines these new forms of media from critical, practical, and aesthetic perspectives. Students will examine the aesthetic foundations of "new media", debate the strengths and weaknesses of each medium, and explore their cultural significance. Additionally, students will engage in multiple storytelling projects over the course of the semester utilizing a variety of media.
View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course counts as a Media Practice elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor and as a Film Criticism elective for the Film Studies minor. It also counts toward the Multimedia Arts minor as a Media Practice elective if students elect to complete a final project.

Patrick Johnson has worked as a film and video editor in Los Angeles, cutting a number of independent feature films that have screened at film festivals throughout the world. He is an instructor of film and new media who has taught a Boston University, Tufts University Experimental College, and Keene State College. He received his MFA in Film Production from Boston University.


EXP-0053-S: TV's West Wing and the Executive Branch
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04845
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00-7:15 PM, Bromfield-Pearson 101

The average American can probably name more television shows than members of the United States cabinet. The American government is a complicated system. What better way to inspire students to learn than applying lessons to an Emmy-award winning television series on the Executive Branch. This class will seek to create a better understanding of the American government by studying episodes of The West Wing. Topics will cover issues ranging from positions within the executive branch to foreign policy, inauguration addresses to budget management.

Jacob Schiller is a senior majoring in Political Science and minoring in Religion at Tufts.

Matthew Kline is a senior majoring in Political Science and minoring in Economics at Tufts.


EXP-0055-CS: Multimedia Journalism for the 21st Century
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04777
Monday, 1:30-4:00 PM, Jackson 06

To paraphrase Thomas Jefferson, a healthy democracy depends on an informed electorate. It remains the central role of the journalist to provide reliable information to the public, and it is a job made more challenging by the sheer volume of information available today. In this course, students will learn by doing: students will put themselves in the role of the journalist with projects in which they will have to gather reliable primary source information, assimilate it, condense it, and create compelling content for print, broadcast, and internet media. In doing so, we will examine how the role of the journalist has remained the same even as the requirements of the job have evolved. Questions to be considered include: What exactly is a multimedia journalist or a "cross-platform content provider"? Is information communicated differently on different platforms? And what are the skills required of the journalist going forward?
View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective.

Anthony Everett is a multiple Emmy and National Headliner Award recipient who currently hosts Chronicle, the nightly television newsmagazine of WCVB-TV, the ABC affiliate in Boston. Everett is a 1983 graduate of Tufts and former Editor-in-Chief of the Tufts Daily. He has been a broadcast journalist since 1984 and has covered news, politics, and human interest stories across America and around the world.


EXP-0056-CS: Making Movies
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04778
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Braker 2

What does it take to be a filmmaker? Are you ready to make the commitment? This course will immerse students in the practice and logic associated with camera, lighting, audio and editing – all in the service of learning how to tell a story cinematically. Working in teams, students will complete a series of small projects aimed at developing their technical and stylistic skills. At the same time, they will engage in analyses of filmmakers whose styles and methods are not far removed from that of the class. The teams will then produce original short features, the last of which will be exhibited in a public screening at semester's end.

HIGH DEMAND. In order to be considered for enrollment, you MUST attend the first class meeting at 6:30pm on Thursday, January 19, in Braker 001.

This course counts as a Media Practice elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor, as a Film Practice elective for the Film Studies minor, and Media Practice credit for the Multimedia Arts minor.

Don Schechter (A '01, M '03) is the founder of Charles River Media Group, a Boston-based production company. He is currently co-producer, cinematographer, editor, and composer for an independent feature film called Marranos and has worked on numerous projects for such clients as The Rolling Stones, A&E, NBC, and The New York Times. Segments from his recent award-winning documentary, A Good Whack, were aired on MSNBC and the BBC.


EXP-0057-CS: Media Law and Ethics: Friending and the First Amendment
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04779
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Bromfield-Pearson 101

Legal and ethical issues and changes in technology have always shaped how Americans get (or don't get) the news, from politically fueled rumors about Thomas Jefferson in 18th century newspapers to paparazzi-fueled cable shows and web sites to stories based on Tweets that are often false. This course will examine basic issues of law and ethics that affect journalists and, more importantly, the public that the press is supposed to inform. It will review the political, historic, and philosophical roots of the First Amendment and provide an overview of key issues in press law, including libel, anonymous sources, and the right to privacy or lack thereof. Building on that legal foundation, the course will examine ethical issues, such as how to balance the public's right to know (and to view streaming cell phone videos) with an individual's right to privacy.
View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course counts as a Social Sciences elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Phil Primack (A '70) is a longtime journalist who has covered politics, the economy and a range of other stories. A former staff reporter for both weekly and daily newspapers, his stories appear regularly in The Boston Sunday Globe Magazine. He is a contributing writer for CommonWealth magazine and has been published in The New York Times, Boston magazine, Columbia Journalism Review, and many other outlets. He has also worked as a policy advisor to elected officials, including former Rep. Joseph P. Kennedy II.


EXP-0058-CS: Social Marketing
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04780
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Bromfield-Pearson 07

Advertisers use our emotions to convince us we need more - and more expensive - stuff. But the same marketing that drives our consumer lust for the material world can also make us care about and invest in social causes, moral constructs and political ideologies. In this course, we will explore the influence of marketing tactics and learn how to create strategies that can change public opinion and generate new thinking and action in arenas that include the environment, global development, animal welfare, human health, education and politics. Do we choose our causes the same way that we choose our cars?
View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course counts as a Social Sciences elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Gail Bambrick is Senior Marketing Communications Writer at Tufts. She uses the written word and strategic planning to focus Tufts' identity and messaging in online, print and web communications. She has also been Director of Publications and Associate Director of Communications and Public Relations for the university, as well as the News Media and Public Relations Manager for the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. She earned her Ph.D. at Tufts in American literature.


EXP-0064-S: Central Asia: Twenty Years of Independence
This course has been cancelled due to low enrollment.
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04847
Thursday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 204

Is life better twenty years after the dissolution of the USSR for the people of Central Asia? This course will introduce students to politics and societies of this geopolitically important region. We will begin with an examination of how in 1991 five states that once had been coalesced into a single region of Central Asia (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Turkmenistan) became sovereign republics. We will then look at the processes by which these new nation-states have dealt with their common and individual social, economic and political challenges while searching to define their own national identity. In addition, students will analyze the historical background of the Soviet Central Asian states while, at the same time, paying attention to the dynamics of the current sociopolitical conflicts in the region, especially in area of political reform.

This course has been approved to count for World Civilizations credit.

Feruza Aripova worked as an independent researcher for the project Acting Together on the World Stage: Performance and the Creative Transformation of Conflict and is a Teaching Fellow for the Russian Language Program at Brandeis University. She is a graduate of the Coexistence and Conflict from Brandeis University and is currently involved with the Central Asia and Caucasus working group at Harvard University.


EXP-0066-S: Anarchisms in the Americas
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04848
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, East 016

This class aims to take students through the recent history of anarchist oriented movements in such key countries as Argentina, Chile, Mexico, and the United States. The approach of covering a century and four countries will help push us to think comparatively and critically, to see continuities and ruptures. While anarchism held a prominent place in social movements a century ago, its history has been eclipsed by Marxist movements that took center stage for most of the 20th century. This class seeks to restore the rightful place of anarchism in the history of social movements in the Americas over the past century, as well as call attention to recent social movements that clearly draw on longer trajectories of anarchist movement.
View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course has been approved to count as an elective in the Latin American Studies major.

Joshua Savala has worked as a union organizer and has been involved with the Student Immigrant Movement (SIM) as well as Occupy Boston. He is a graduate student in History at Tufts University, where his work has focused mainly on Chilean labor and social movement history.


EXP-0070-S: The Constitution and American Education
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04849
Monday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Bromfield-Pearson 101

This course explores how Constitutional law has shaped the contours of educational institutions and the academic process in the United States. We will concentrate on three particular areas: (1) equality in public education, (2) religious speech in public schools, and (3) individual rights in public schools. For each particular area, the course will focus equally on the historical, political and sociological factors underlying the seminal cases, with students being challenged to explain how these factors defined and formed constitutional law. Students will then critically analyze how these cases impacted educational institutions and consider how present sociological and economic factors will affect future litigation and decisions.

Douglas Martland is an Assistant Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He previously clerked for the Honorable Justice Gary Katzmann of the Massachusetts Appeals Court and for the judges of the Superior Court of Massachusetts.

Steve Sharobem is an Assistant Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He previously clerked for the Honorable Justice William Cowin of the Massachusetts Appeals Court and for the judges of the Superior Court of Massachusetts.


EXP-0074-S: Famous Trials in U.S. History
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04850
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 204

O.J. Simpson. Lizzie Borden. The Salem Witch Trials. President Clinton's impeachment proceedings.

These four trials, separated in time and place, cover the span of three centuries of American history. What makes trials such as these so resonant? Why do some garner attention so universally, while others - perhaps more interesting or sordid - do not? While there were great differences between the defendants in these particular cases, the outcomes of the trials, and the periods in which they took place, share the commonality of being defined as "great American trials" or "trials of the century" - trials that have a unique place in our history. This course will discuss these cases and others like them, with the intention of resolving what made them so iconic and so influential in American history and popular culture. Read more information here.
View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Ian C. Pilarczyk is the founding Director of the Executive LL.M. in International Business Law at Boston University School of Law. Prior to that, he served as the founding Associate Director of the LL.M. in International Law at the Fletcher School. He received his J.D. from Boston University, and his LL.M. and Doctor of Civil Law degrees from McGill University.


EXP-0084-S: Wealth, Tax, and the American People
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04851
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Braker 222

Is it true that Warren Buffett's secretary pays more in taxes than her multi-billionaire boss? Is it fair to levy a surcharge on "millionaires and billionaires" when 46% of Americans will not pay any federal taxes in 2011? How is it possible that 1% of Americans hold 35% of the wealth in the U.S. while the bottom 20% collectively holds less than .1%? We are the 99%. Occupy Wall Street. The Buffett Rule. Millionaire Surtax. Class Warfare. America is grappling with the widening chasm between the "haves" and the "have-nots". This course will join the conversation and consider extreme wealth distribution in America within the context of market failure and government failure -- in particular, how tax interventionist strategies have further concentrated wealth among few.

Ladidas Lumpkins has been in the tax field for 15 years, nearly 10 of those years serving high net-worth families. She is a Tax Manager at CBIZ Tofias in Boston, Massachusetts, providing high-level tax planning, consulting and compliance services to high net-worth families. She holds a J.D. from Suffolk University Law School, and an LL.M. in Taxation from Boston University Law School.


EXP-0087-S: Microfinance: Financial Services for the Poor
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04852
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Miner 225

What if you could give $25 to a business owner in an underdeveloped nation and the impact would be that they could feed, educate, and clothe their children for the next 10 months? Would you believe this is possible? In the world of microfinance anything is possible and extraordinary results can be achieved. In this course, we'll address how these achievements can be made and we'll take a comprehensive look at microfinance and its impact on people and societies. After forming a solid understanding of the various products offered under the microfinance umbrella (i.e., microcredit, microsavings, microinsurance), we'll collaborate to examine opportunities for domestic and international microfinance initiatives. Students will actively participate in the microfinance market by lending to an actual business owner of their choice, analyzing real-time case studies from around the globe and interacting with Boston-area microloan recipients.

This course is supported by the Experimental College's Distler Family Endowment, the aim of which is to provide students with courses that bridge the academy and the world of work.

This class has been approved by Entrepreneurial Leadership Studies to count as an elective toward the minor.

Adam Grenier has been a Fellow with Kiva.org, a leading online microfinance lending community whose mission is to connect people through lending for the sake of alleviating poverty. He also worked with Salone Microfinance Trust (SMT) in Sierra Leone, a non-governmental organization that serves the financial needs of over 5,300 economically active poor.


EXP-0088-S: Understanding the Stock Market: History, Structure and Impact
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04860
Thursday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Miner 225

One day it's up, the next it's down. One day the Dow is setting records, the next day a "market correction" ushers in gloom and doom. What makes the stock market tick? In this course students will begin to develop an understanding of, and an appreciation for, the fundamentals of stock market investing in the context of larger social, demographic, political, and economic issues. Beginning with a brief historical overview, we will attempt to assess the significance of key time periods, such as 1929, 1973, and 1987. We will then move to a discussion of the unprecedented change that the market has undergone the last ten years. Major themes in this discussion include the globalization of investing, the relationship between Social Security and the market, socially responsible investing, the impact of technology, and the mutual fund explosion. Finally, special attention will be paid to the unique role the stockbroker plays in the investment process.

Timothy Stratford has had twenty years of experience as a financial services professional at brokerage houses such as Shearson Lehman Brothers and Smith Barney Harris and Upham.


EXP-0096-S: Auditing for Breadth
0.5-1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04784

This program is intended to provide students with an opportunity to broaden their education by attending courses in which they might not otherwise enroll. With the approval of the instructors in question, students may elect to audit any three full-credit university courses (or the equivalent) during their four years as an undergraduate. (One course credit is awarded upon completion of the three audits.) Please note: graduating seniors may audit two courses and receive one-half credit.

For more information about this program and an application, contact Cindy Stewart, at the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Ave, x72257.

Cindy Stewart is the Assistant Director of the Experimental College.


EXP-0099-CS: Media Internships
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04785

Supervised internship in communications and mass media. Student can intern at a newspaper, magazine, book publishing company, film production company, television or radio station, advertising or public relations firm, or other media outlet approved by instructor. Students must intern a minimum of 150 hours during the semester (usually 12-16 hours a week), fulfill written assignments, and meet regularly with the instructor. Registration by consent of instructor. Student should consult with instructor prior to researching and applying for internships, and must submit an Internship Agreement signed by the internship site supervisor prior to being allowed to register.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For more information, contact the instructor, Susan Eisenhauer, at susan.eisenhauer@tufts.edu.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Practice elective.

Susan Eisenhauer (J '71) holds a M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Among other responsibilities, she directs the Communications internship program, supervising more than 90 students each year who intern for credit at various media organizations.


EXP-0101-CS: Advanced Filmmaking
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04786

Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who have completed EXP-0056-CS: Making Movies – or who are able to demonstrate equivalent competence - can continue their training as filmmakers. Students who initially qualify will present a business plan for their project and, if accepted, will receive credit, access to TuftsFilmWorks'production and editing equipment, and a supervised context within which to work. In return, they agree to watch a negotiated number of source films, keep a Producer's Log and write a final assessment, taking into account both the process they went through to produce their film and their reaction to the film once it's done.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For information on eligibility and registration, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x73384.

Advanced Filmmaking is supported by the generosity of Lisa and Bruce Cohen ('J86 and 'A83, respectively).

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Practice elective.

Howard Woolf is Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks, co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.


EXP-0102-CS: Advanced Electronic and Digital Media
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04787

Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who are able to demonstrate an appropriate degree of competence can continue their training in the multimedia arts.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For information on eligibility and registration, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x73384.

This course will count toward Media Practice credit for the Multimedia Arts minor and for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Howard Woolf is Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks, co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.

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Courses Open Only to Designated Students


EXP-0041-S: Education for Active Citizenship
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04775
Friday, 10:30 AM-1:15 PM, Rabb Room, Lincoln Filene

This course is meant to prepare Tisch Scholars for active citizenship in communities both inside and outside of Tufts. Their active citizenship should be socially beneficial, ethical, educationally and intellectually challenging, and should develop advanced civic skills that are also valuable skills in the workplace. E4AC will begin the learning process by orienting the students to Tufts' host communities (and to Tufts as a community), by beginning an exploration of ethical issues that arise for active citizens, and by building a public website about the host communities that will be a resource for all Tisch Scholars as they plan and conduct community work.

Please Note: Only students who have been pre-selected for the E4AC program are permitted to enroll.

Peter Levine is Director of CIRCLE, The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning, and Research Director of the Jonathan Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service at Tufts.


EXP-0090-TS: Teaching Assistant Workshop
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04781

This course is designed to assist the undergraduates who are teaching assistants for courses in the Experimental College.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0091-AS: Inquiry Teaching Group
0.5 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04782

Inquiry is a global-issues simulation for high school students, and forms an integral part of the year's activities for EPIIC. Students in this course will help design and enact a simulation on Confronting Conflict in the 21st Century, to be held during the Spring 2012 semester. In the process, students will mentor a high school delegation and prepare them for this simulation — helping them understand all the materials and issues involved.

Steve Cohen teaches in the Education department at Tufts.

Heather Barry is the Associate Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts.


EXP-0091-S: EPIIC: Confronting Conflict in the 21st Century
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04783
Tuesday and Thursday, 3:00-5:30 PM, Tisch 304

More than 1.5 billion people currently live in countries directly affected by conflict, with millions more feeling the indirect consequences. While inter-state and intra-state violence have seen recent declines, violence is still on the rise, compromising peace, security and development. The 2011-12 EPIIC colloquium will explore the complexity and challenges of international, national, and local conflict in this century.

For more information, click here.

Please Note: This course is a continuation of the EPIIC class from last semester.

Sherman Teichman is Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts, and the founding director of EPIIC (Education for Public Inquiry and International Citizenship). He holds an M.A. from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.


EXP-0097-S: Quidnunc: E3
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04854

The E3 project is composed of two parts: a quidnunc class through the ExCollege during the fall semester, in which you can earn 0.5 credits, and an after school service learning curriculum for high school students during the spring semester. Throughout the course, we will be collaborating with the Tisch College and the Cambridge nonprofit Barakat who strive to educate women and children in South and Central Asia. Two graduated seniors, Zoe Schlag and Gitanjali Paul, developed the service learning curriculum which focuses on human rights, the right to education and civic engagement. The purpose of the quidnunc course is to provide members of the project with a chance to improve, adapt and finalize the curriculum based on your own investigation of the issues. Steve Cohen will serve as advisor for the course.


EXP-0192-PS: Independent Study
0.5-1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04789

By arrangement only. For more information, come by the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Avenue, or call x73384.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0192-S: Independent Study
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04790

By arrangement only. For more information, come by the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Avenue, or call x73384.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0194-CS: CMS Senior Project
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04855

All CMS minors completing their Senior Projects this semester must register for this class.

Julie Dobrow is Director of the Communications and Media Studies and the Media and Public Service programs at Tufts. She holds a Ph.D. in Communications from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania.