Courses

Fall 2012 Courses

Registration for these courses will take place on SIS Online and will begin at 9:00am on the first day of Fall classes, Tuesday, September 4. Registration will continue for open courses until 5:00pm on Tuesday, September 18. This page was last updated 9/6/12. Please check back for more updates.


Courses Open to All Students


EXP-0003-F: Reading Infinite Jest: David Foster Wallace and the Future of the Novel
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04100
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 124

In the age of the Internet, who writes a thousand-page book? In an era of increasingly shorter and shorter attention spans, who reads it?

Students in this course will both answer and challenge these and a welter of related questions by spending the semester immersed in Wallace's groundbreaking novel. Set in a fictional future at a tennis academy in the Boston suburbs, the world of Infinite Jest seems at once strange and familiar, as it explores the impact that visual and internet technologies have on human identity and community building. And we will alternate between the world of the novel and our own in order to discover how the internet age has fostered new communities of novel readers and how such communities inform our own practices of reading literature. In addition, we will consider the novel within its broader media environment, thinking about how, as readers, they situate themselves in relation to this text, to the online world, and to one another.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Jacqueline O'Dell has taught English 1 and English 2 at Tufts for the past four years. She is a Ph.D. candidate in the Tufts English Department, and her current work focuses on the relationship between critical and popular discourse surrounding what many have called the "post-postmodern" novel, particularly how it has both adapted to and resisted the emerging technologies of social media.


EXP-0004-F: Religion and the Graphic Novel ***NEW COURSE***
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #TBA
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Tisch 310

Is Superman based more on Moses or on Jesus? Can reading a comic book be a religious ritual? This course will consider the influence of religion outside of the churches, synagogues, temples, and mosques – particularly in popular culture, and especially in comic books and graphic novels. We will explore such questions as why the divide between religious and secular society is as messy and enmeshed as the space between words and images in a comic and, why, according to several cultural scholars, Americans have a surprisingly limited "religious literacy" in even detecting references, allusions, and inspirations from faith in popular culture and art. Our work will be grounded in several award-winning graphic novels the study of which will enhance students' sensitivity and skills to deepen their third-party appreciation of both religion's and the medium's active engagement.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Humanities and the Arts elective.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

A. David Lewis, an accomplished graphic novelist, university lecturer, and comics studies researcher, is the co-editor of the collection, Graven Images: Religion in Comic Books & Graphic Novels. In addition to serving as an Editorial Board member for the International Journal of Comic Art, he is the author of two graphic novels, the award-winning Lone and Level Sands and Some New Kind of Slaughter.


EXP-0005-F: An Introduction to Translation: Practice and Theory
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04101
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 202

Are you fluent in a language other than English? Have you ever thought about what it takes to translate a text from, say, French, or Arabic, or Japanese into English? Would you like to learn how it's done? In this course students will complete three projects: a non-fiction translation, a literary translation, and the subtitling of a video. At the same time, they will read thought-provoking and engaging writing on the subject, including classic texts, current controversies, and questions of translation and power, human rights, and war. The course will be conducted in English, and students may work from any language into English.

NOTE: You should have completed at least level 4 in your language of choice (or have equivalent experience). Upper level courses and study abroad are a plus.

Ellen Elias-Bursac has been translating Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian writing into English for thirty five years and has received two national awards. She worked as a language reviser at the War Crimes Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia in The Hague for six years and taught at the Harvard University Slavic Department for ten years. She holds an MA and Ph.D. from Zagreb University in Comparative Literature/Philogy.


EXP-0006-F: Harry Potter and Christian Theology

The instructor for this course is no longer able to teach this semester, and the course has been cancelled.


EXP-0012-F: Folk Traditions in American Popular Music
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04110
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Olin 11

What exactly is "folk" music? Who defined it as such, and why? This course will offer students the chance to engage with questions like these through in-depth analysis of cultural theory, history, and musical examples. We will explore such issues as the debate over the existence of a true "folk" music culture in the New World, John Lomax's attempt to delineate uniquely "American" elements in the music of cowboys and others. Questions to be considered include: How did Lomax, and other collectors of this time define terms such as "American" and "folk," and what goals did they have in doing so? How did competing trends in American folk scholarship combine to form the 50s/60s Folk Revival? How has this movement shaped our current understanding of folk music, and is it possible to move beyond them?

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Humanities and the Arts elective.

This course has been approved by the Music Department to count toward the Arts Distribution requirement.

Andre Diehl recently worked for Smithsonian Folkways Recordings on the annual Smithsonian Folklife Festival. He is currently a graduate student in the University of Massachusetts Boston's American Studies program, and this past fall, he presented on the panel, The Wire: A Postmortem, at the annual meeting of the American Studies Association.


EXP-0013-F: Deconstructing Rap
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04111
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 204

Rap confronts listeners with explicit content and potentially offensive subject matter. This course encourages students to listen past the hardened surface of rap. It emphasizes methodologies and analytical tools that permit rigorous thinking, writing, and (most importantly) listening. Students will examine lyrical content, sampled and borrowed material, text-music relations, rhetorical gestures, and other devices that distinguish rap as a sophisticated mode of literary and musical expression. The course spans rap's origins to the present, and considers artists such as Public Enemy, Common, 2Pac, Eminem, and Jay-Z. The perspectives of critics and scholars -- including Jeff Chang, Henry Louis Gates, David Foster Wallace, and others - complement listening assignments and writing exercises.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Humanities and the Arts elective.

This course has been approved by the Music Department to count toward the Arts Distribution requirement.

Andrew Shryock holds a Ph.D. in musicology at Boston University. His research interests are oriented toward music of the eighteenth century and hip-hop. With regard to hip-hop, his work considers rappers' efforts to invoke literary-intellectual traditions to reinforce their public persona. As an example of this work, he recently delivered a paper examining God complexes in the music of Jay-Z and T-Pain.


EXP-0015-F: Money and Ethics in the Contemporary Art World
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04112
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Eaton 201

What's behind the glamour of the contemporary art auctions, the collectors, the dealers, and the art fairs? How has the recent rapid rise in prices affected artistic production? What roles do museums play in the contemporary art market? Is the international market in contemporary art sustainable, or should it be?

This course will explore the conflicting business interests found in the international contemporary art market, the role of museums in the market, the recent expansion of international and online opportunities for presenting and marketing artists' work, and the market's effects on the practice of art-making. The course is designed for students interested in the art world, in museum practice, and/or in how practicing contemporary artists function in the markets.

This course has been approved by the Art and Art History Department to count toward the Arts Distribution requirement.

Laura Knott is on the curatorial staff at the MIT Museum, where she frequently develops exhibitions of contemporary art. She has worked for the past 25 years in the contemporary art world as a practitioner, professor, and curator. Laura holds a Master's degree from the Center for Advanced Visual Studies at MIT.


EXP-0017-F: Jewish Theatre in the 20th Century
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04113
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Braker 223

This course explores Jewish identity through the lens of theatre and performance both in the United States and Israel. We will begin with a historical overview while considering the question: "What does Jewishness mean?" Is it related to ethnicity, race, or religion? Identity or culture? Belief or practice? Is it in and of itself a kind of "performance?" From there we'll turn to a survey of Jewish American theater – from the Yiddish-language theater of the the early 20th century to playwrights who defined a certain kind of American middle-class life, to contemporary playwrights and performers who navigate the complexity of Jewish American identity in a range of genres and tones. Finally, the class will focus on the development of Israeli theater and the impact that Zionism, the establishment of the state, and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict have had on Jewish identity.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course is supported by the Goldner Family Fund, in conjunction with Judaic Studies and the Experimental College.

This course has been approved by the Judaic Studies program to count toward either major or minor credit. Students can also register for JS-0091-05, but either course number will receive the credit.

Laura Ligouri has over fifteen years of performing and theater experience and was named a Schusterman Scholar at the Schusterman Center for Israel Studies. She is currently a Ph.D. candidate in Psychology at Branndeis University researching the uses of drama therapy to address trauma and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.


EXP-0019-F: Research for Success: Using the Library for Thesis and Capstone Projects
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04022
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Tisch 223

Are you thinking about writing an honors thesis your senior year? Would you like to get a head start or immediate help understanding the research process? Would you enjoy sharing what you learn as you become an expert in the subject area you are investigating? This course will introduce you to the major research tools and techniques at an intermediate-to-advanced level specific to your subject area. You will also develop a working bibliography of resources, as well as a plan for continuing your research.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

View a video introduction to this course >

NOTE: This is an eight-week course.

Regina Raboin is the Science Reference Librarian and Reference Microforms/Current Periodicals Coordinator at Tisch Library.

Laurie Sabol is the Social Science Reference Librarian and Coordinator of Library Instruction at Tisch Library.


EXP-0021-F: Rising Tide: Climate Change, Vulnerability, and Adaptation
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04114
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 002

What makes a person or a community vulnerable to the impacts of climate change? And what are the challenges to governments responding to those vulnerabilities? While climate change adaptation is often viewed as an environmental problem with technological solutions, this course explores a people-centered approach. The conceptual underpinnings of vulnerability and resilience will be followed by real-world lessons from adaptation and disaster risk-reduction initiatives. The course will bridge global policy and local practice, using developing country planning documents, a statewide adaptation plan, and a local Boston neighborhood as case studies. The methodology of the course is highly interactive and experimental, including a seminar-style class format, practitioners as guest speakers, "policy" and "practice" field trips, group learning, and role-playing simulation.

View course syllabus >

This course has been approved to count toward the Environmental Studies major. For information about which "track," click here.

Kim Foltz is the Director of Community Building & Environment at Neighborhood of Affordable Housing (NOAH) in East Boston, where she oversees community organizing, environmental, and social justice programming. Previously she served as Board Chair and Acting Director of "Bikes Not Bombs." She holds an MA in Urban Planning from MIT, with a certificate in Environmental Policy and Planning.

Rebecca Pearl-Martinez is a Senior Strategist with International Union for Conservation of Nature, the world's oldest and largest global environmental organization. She has been engaged for over a decade in UN environmental negotiations, co-founded a climate change initiative with 50 UN and NGO institutions, and recently served as Senior Researcher for Climate Change at Oxfam America. She holds an M.A. in Sustainable International Development from the Heller School for Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University.


EXP-0023-F: Fracked Out: Understanding the New Gas Rush
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04115
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Lane 100A

Thanks in part to the advent of hydraulic fracturing ("fracking"), our nation is now experiencing an unprecedented boom in natural gas drilling. This new gas rush is resulting in a wide range of environmental and health impacts - including spills of toxic laced fluid, wellhead explosions, millions of gallons of contaminated wastewater, tons of smog-forming air pollution, and landscapes marred by clearcuts, compressors, and waste pits. Yet the oil and gas industry and its defenders are using their considerable resources to persuade the public that natural gas extraction is a vital boost to the economy, an important part of our nation's energy strategy, and can even help solve global warming. How can students and other citizens engage in the issue and make a difference?

In this course, we'll start with the facts - reviewing and critically evaluating the claims and concerns raised on both sides of this debate. After reviewng the problem, students will assess the effectiveness and viability of policy responses and other solutions. In the second half of the semester, the curriculum will move from analysis to active citizenry: students will develop advocacy positions, messaging, strategy, and tactics specific to this issue.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course has been approved to count toward the Environmental Studies major. For information about which "track," click here.

John Rumpler is a senior attorney at Environment America and is leading the effort of a national environmental organization to restrict, regulate, and ultimately end the practice of hydrofracking. His passion for environmental issues began as a Tufts undergrad in the 1980s, where he became a student leader of MASSPIRG. Over the years, he has had the opportunity to fight for clean air in Ohio, work with environmental justice communities here in the greater Boston area, and advocate for clean water policies to protect the Great Lakes and the Chesapeake Bay.


EXP-0026-F: Introduction to Sustainable Agriculture and Food Systems
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04116
Monday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Lane 100A

The course aims to give students a broad but thorough foundation in the field of alternative, sustainable agriculture and food systems. We will discuss the theory and practice of alternative agricultural systems (agroecology, urban farming, CSAs etc.) as well as social and political issues within the food system including food justice, farm-worker rights, food insecurity, and social movements. The course will be complimented by hands-on learning and engagement at the Tufts campus garden, where the concepts discussed in lecture and discussion can be translated and framed through experience. Though the course stands well on its own, it aims to be the first in a two-part series, in which the follow-up course will delve deeper into the political and social justice issues.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course has been approved to count toward the Environmental Studies major. For information about which "track," click here.

Caitlin Hachmyer worked for two non-profits (Community Alliance with Family Farmers and Food First/The Institute for Food and Development Policy), before turning back to the land and beginning her career as a farmer. After farming for four years, she is now at Tufts as a graduate student in Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning, where she's focusing on food systems.


EXP-0027-F: "When the snow has not frozen": Change and Resilience in the Arctic
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04117
Thursday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 202

Climate-induced changes in the Arctic can't be overstated. The Arctic is currently experiencing extreme changes in temperature, sea ice extent, sea level rise, and animal species shifts. Local Inuit populations are negotiating changing hunting grounds, novel sea ice conditions and altered food-sharing culture critical for annual subsistence. Diminishing ice extent is spurring international resource interest in previously inaccessible ice-covered areas: the Northwest Passage and oil exploration are contentious topics. This class will examine these issues in order to better understand their complexities and to relate them to notions of resilience, or capacity to withstand changes. The goal of this course is to have students gain understanding and foster critical thinking skills about change and resilience in the Arctic.

The first half of the class will examine the conditions of change in the Arctic, spanning ecological, social and political-economic contexts. The second half of the class will examine the notion of resilience, looking specifically at how it relates to our discussions on a changing Arctic, and what its contributions and potential limitations are.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course has been approved to count toward the Environmental Studies major. For information about which "track," click here.

Nathan Stewart has spent the last five years conducting research in the Arctic on ice-mediated nearshore systems and has participated in two film expeditions on sea ice and the Inupiaq Inuit. He is an advanced Ph.D. candidate in Marine Biology at the School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.


EXP-0029-F: Forensic Behavioral Analysis
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04118
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 006

Why do certain individuals perpetrate violent, predatory crimes? Can we predict with any certainty who will commit crimes of violence? This course is designed to allow students to examine the development of individual criminality and criminal careers, social group processes in criminal activity, varieties of criminal behavior including violent, sexual and predatory crime, mental disorders, psychopathy and crime, victims and victimization, offender profiling, and forensic criminal investigation. The course will also explore the contribution of psychology to our contemporary understanding of crime and the criminal justice processes through the application of psychological theory in investigation of crime and the efficacy of the criminal justice system.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Tom Nolan is a Senior Policy and Program Analyst at the Department of Homeland Security, Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties in Washington, DC. Tom was an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice at Boston University from 2004-2011 and in an earlier career was a Boston police officer for twenty-seven years. He earned both a master's degree and a doctorate from Boston University.


EXP-0033-F: Campus Community Emergency Response Team
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04119
Wednesday, 1:00-3:00 PM, Sophia Gordon MP Room

The C-CERT course provides students with the skills required by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to serve as a Community Emergency Response Team member within their campus community. Completion of this training will provide the student with the basic skills they may need in the aftermath of a disaster or other emergency and the opportunity to assist the Tufts Community and the Department of Public Safety by joining Tufts C-CERT. By working together, C-CERT members can assist in saving lives and protecting property using the skills gained in this course. This course meets FEMA and Emergency Management Institute (EMI) requirements for CERT training.

Mark Roche is a member of the Tufts University Police Department and a certified CERT Instructor. He also serves as a CERT Team Leader and Operations Captain with a local Emergency Management agency. He is currently an instructor for the Experimental College teaching the Rape Aggression Defense for Women and Advanced Rape Aggression Defense courses.


EXP-0034-F: RAD for Men
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04120
Wednesday, 4:30-6:30 PM, Sophia Gordon MP Room

Providing "responsible information" about self defense training to men may not be what they are in fact looking for. Some attendees will be seeking a program that will teach them how to fight, bully or exact revenge on previously committed wrongs. This however could not be farther from our program's focus of self defense. In addition, "tactical options" of avoidance and disengagement are in fact responsible and successful the vast majority of the time, because men are generally not assaulted simply because they are men, as women often are. Most men (not all) "find themselves in confrontational situations" often as a result of their own choices and removing themselves from these situations is usually very easy when pride, anger, and ego are not factors.

Luis Santamaria is a member of the Tufts University Police Department. He has been teaching RAD for women over the last four years and RAD for men over the last two years. He has attended the certification for both programs and successfully completed the requirements. He holds a M.A. in Criminal Justice Administration from Western New England University.


EXP-0035-AF: Rape Aggression Defense
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04121
Monday, 4:45-6:45 PM, Sophia Gordon MP Room

The Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.) is based on the philosophy of choices: "to develop and enhance the OPTIONS of self defense, so that they become more viable considerations for the woman who is attacked." While it is completely natural to resist, unless a woman is trained to do so the resistance she attempts may be futile. This course will try to strengthen innate survival techniques by making more options available. Preparation through education and training is usually the best way to survive an assault situation. Issues that will be addressed include awareness and prevention, sexual assault definitions, patterns of encounter, the decision to resist, basic principles of self-defense, and the defensive mindset. This course will end with realistic simulation training.

Mark Roche and Kerri Dervishian are members of the Tufts University Police Department and certified R.A.D. instructors.


EXP-0035-BF: Rape Aggression Defense
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04122
Thursday, 4:30-6:30 PM, Sophia Gordon MP Room

The Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.) is based on the philosophy of choices: "to develop and enhance the OPTIONS of self defense, so that they become more viable considerations for the woman who is attacked." While it is completely natural to resist, unless a woman is trained to do so the resistance she attempts may be futile. This course will try to strengthen innate survival techniques by making more options available. Preparation through education and training is usually the best way to survive an assault situation. Issues that will be addressed include awareness and prevention, sexual assault definitions, patterns of encounter, the decision to resist, basic principles of self-defense, and the defensive mindset. This course will end with realistic simulation training.

Darren Weisse is a member of the Tufts University Police Department and a certified R.A.D. instructor.


EXP-0036-F: Advanced Rape Aggression Defense
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04123
Monday, 7:00-9:00 PM, Sophia Gordon MP Room

Advanced Rape Aggression Defense (Advanced RAD) is a continuation of the Basic program and answers a lot of the "what if" questions. The program will begin with a review of the basic program followed by simulation. This course is more hands on than the basic program and includes topics such as defending against multiple attackers and defense against weapons such as knives and guns. Throughout the course, the instructors will conduct realistic simulation training using impact targets and facilitate discussions on sexual assault, crime prevention and personal protection.

NOTE: EXP35, Rape Aggression Defense, is a prerequisite for this course.

Mark Roche and Kerri Dervishian are members of the Tufts University Police Department and certified R.A.D. instructors.


EXP-0037-F: African Diaspora Religions: Vodou, Pop Culture, and the Culture Wars
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04124
Thursday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 112

This course will introduce students to the study of African diaspora religions, through the lens of exploring why these traditions -- usually in mangled form -- appear so frequently in American pop culture products, especially horror films. Course materials will include scholarly depictions of African diaspora religions and popular stories, novels, films, and television shows. Quickly moving beyond the simple question of whether such products accurately depict these religions, the focus will instead be on exploring what work they do in creating and maintaining cultural and racial boundaries. While the special focus of the course will be Haitian Vodou, students will also explore Regla de Ocha (Santeria), Palo, Candomble, and conjure/hoodoo. Particular attention will be given to the genre of horror movies, in which voodoo's connections with violence against whites and hypersexuality are exploited to produce both terror and arousal. Students are forewarned that course materials will include depictions of violence and sexuality (i.e. the bread and butter of horror) - and an emphasis will be placed on critically deconstructing these images, rather than passively receiving them.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Ths course has been approved by the Religion department to count toward the Humanities Distribution requirement. This course has also been approved to count toward the World Civilizations requirement.

Adam McGee has been involved in the Haitian Vodou community for nearly a decade and has been apprenticed to Vodou priestess Marie Maude Evans for five years. He is a doctoral candidate in African and African American Studies at Harvard University, and is currently employed as a Teaching Fellow by Harvard College and Harvard Divinity School. His research focuses on the historical and cultural processes that impact the lives of Haitian Vodouisants, as well as the ways that those lives are perceived and imagined by outsiders.


EXP-0038-F: The History of Once Upon a Time: A Close Look at Fairy Tales
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04125
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, East 016

Fairy tales have been part of human culture as long as stories have been told. New versions and retellings are constantly being written and published. But where do fairy tales really come from? How have they changed? Why do we keep telling them? In this course, students will examine early versions of selected tales and their modern retellings in several genres. We will examine the cultural, social, ideological histories embedded in these texts, as well as gain insight into the human experience captured in fairy tales that touch all parts of our lives.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Humanities and the Arts elective.

Janet Daniels is an English adjunct instructor at Quincy College and a writer of children's literature. While completing her M.F.A. in Writing Literature for Children at Simmons College, she designed an Independent Study in which she analyzed seven fairy tales, charting their evolution from the early documented English literary versions to modern retellings.


EXP-0039-F: Analyzing Stand-up Comedy
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04126
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Braker 226

This course will take a critical, creative, and rhetorical approach to stand-up comedy. What makes us laugh? Who makes us laugh? Are stand-up comedians rhetors and, if they are, what is the nature and purpose of their rhetoric? From George Carlin to Chris Rock, we will watch and discuss performances by some of the most notable stand-up comedians of the last fifty years. We will ask questions about language, race, gender, class, and the function and nature of comedy and laughter. We will approach these issues from the perspectives of classical and epistemic rhetoric, conducting rhetorical analyses of comedic performances using Kenneth Burke's concepts of dramatism and the "comic frame."

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Humanities and the Arts elective.

Steven Kapica is a Ph.D. candidate in English at Northeastern University. His primary fields are composition and rhetoric, and his interests are diverse and interdisciplinary, ranging from multimodal composition and neosophisitic rhetoric, to critical, cultural, and visual theory, to gender and women's studies. His most recent project pairs rhetoric and law with television show Battlestar Galactica.


EXP-0041-F: The Politics of Classroom Science: An Historical Perspective
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04127
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Olin 005

One only needs to look back to 2004 and the Intelligent Design trial in Dover, PA to note how science education in America has been fraught with political, social, and cultural disagreements over the proper role of science in education. Nonetheless, since at least the 1800s Americans have professed a profound faith in the power of science education to mold the individual citizen and transform society for the better. Yet determining what science to teach and how to teach it remains a highly contested field, prone to shifts in political and social winds. Through a variety of primary and secondary readings, this course examines the ways in which science education has been linked to a variety of political and social agendas throughout American history. Although disagreements over the proper role of science education have abounded, the net effect of such disputes has been to bind science ever tighter into American civic life. In this course, the history of science education serves as a lens into understanding how politicians, scientists, and educators have crafted science education as a way to justify their political and epistemic commitments. Similarly, this course examines how such commitments have worked to shape and inform science education.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course had been approved by the Education department to count toward the Social Science Distribution requirement.

This course has been approved to count toward the Environmental Studies major. For information about which "track," click here.)

David Meshoulam taught high-school physics at Brookline High School in Brookline, MA and middle-school science in a small bilingual school in Honduras. He is currently a doctoral student at the University of Wisconsin-Madison in the Department of Curriculum & Instruction where he studies the history of science education in America, with a specific focus on the ways in which history of science has been incorporated into the science curriculum.


EXP-0043-F: A History of Health Policy in the United States
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04128
Thursday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Olin 005

This course places contemporary health policy controversies into a historical perspective. Drawing upon case studies spanning from the American Revolution to the 2010 Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, weekly seminars will highlight some of the major health-related issues that have drawn federal attention and intervention over the course of more than two centuries. These issues include medical care access, containing epidemics, rights to birth control, public health at the nation's borders, in cities, and in workplaces, the institutionalization of scientific research and medical care, food and drug safety, and the definition and control of citizens' vices. Class readings and discussions will focus on how social values and historical circumstance have influenced the creation and shape of a variety of American health policies throughout the nation's history.

This course has been approved to count toward the Environmental Studies major. For information about which "track," click here.)

Jessica Adler worked as a newspaper reporter and then decided to delve more deeply into issues she'd covered by returning to graduate school to study History. A Ph.D. candidate at Columbia University, she is currently completing her dissertation -- "A 'Solemn Obligation': Soldiers, Veterans, and Health Policy, 1917-1924" -- which shows how medical care came to be battled over and granted as a political right for a distinct group of U.S. citizens. Her study uncovers the roots of the U.S. veterans' hospital system, and looks more broadly at the development of an American welfare state that provides privileges to selected beneficiaries.


EXP-0045-F: Gender, Culture, and Human Rights
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04129
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 202

How are international human rights standards gendered? What is the difference between women's human rights and men's human rights? What role does culture play in our conception of human rights? This course examines past and current human rights issues that focus on gender, including changing conceptions of human rights. We will examine gendered human rights in contexts including human trafficking, property rights, economics and physical security, as well as several country-specific case studies (South Africa, Sweden and the United States). Students in this class will develop a solid foundation in international issues grounded in gendered human rights concerns.

Jenna DiCocco is an attorney, teacher and human rights advocate. She is a Visiting Scholar at Northeastern University's Women's Gender & Sexuality Studies Program where she is researching the gendered application of certain criminal law mitigation factors in spousal murder cases. She also writes and publishes the weekly Human Rights RoundUp, a news aggregation blog highlighting current global human rights issues.


EXP-0047-F: Love, Law, and the State: The Evolving Right to Marry
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04130
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 006

What do the current legislative and judicial battles over same-sex marriage tell us about marriage as an institution? Through the lens of the marriage equality movement – including the current litigation over California's Proposition 8 and the Federal Defense of Marriage Act – this course will explore the evolution of the legal right of marriage in the United States. We will look at the current national and state movements, including the distinction between the right to marry and the marriage equality movements, and the practical considerations for each. We will trace the development of the concept of marriage as both a state-created institution and a judicially recognized fundamental right, and we will explore how, historically, courts and legislatures have extended marriage to previously excluded groups. We will also critically examine the limits of that expansion. And we will consider such questions as: Why do some states permit same-sex marriage while others pass constitutional amendments prohibiting same-sex couples to marry? And why does the law continue to draw the line at polygamy, marriage between cousins, and marriage between minors? In this highly interactive class, students will have the opportunity to work with primary and secondary legal sources, learn from visiting experts and present their own written and oral arguments.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Emily Cardy is a staff appellate attorney at the Committee for Public Counsel Services, the Commonwealth's public defense agency. After graduating from the Boston University School of Law, she served as law clerk to the Honorable Charles B. Day, United States Magistrate Judge for the District of Maryland. Emily then returned to Boston and served as law clerk to the Honorable James McHugh, Associate Justice of the Massachusetts Appeals Court.

Ari Kristan is an Assistant Attorney General in the Office of Attorney General Martha Coakley. After graduation from Boston University School of Law, she served as a law clerk to the Honorable Joette Katz, Justice of the Connecticut Supreme Court.


EXP-0051-F: Introduction to Narrative and Documentary Practice
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04023
Wednesday, 4:00-6:30 PM; Friday, 9:30 AM - 12:00 PM, 550 Boston Avenue

As we venture into an era where digitally delivered media and 24-hour news cycles bombard us with a deluge of facts, minutiae, perspective, and hyperbole, the role of narrative storytelling is increasingly useful as a means to present information that is immersive, substantive and accessible. Narrative storytelling elaborates beyond the reporting of facts; it can take something specific – an experience, a voice, a place – and use it to illuminate a larger societal issue.

This course serves as a foundation for preparing students, first, to seek out and understand important global, national and local issues and, then, to explain them in a compelling way using visual, written and oral narrative techniques. It will equip students with a broad practical and theoretical understanding of how to tell stories about the world in which we live – doing so through a variety of immersive exercises, technical workshops, class discussions, guest lectures, and group and individual critiques.

NOTE: This course is High Demand. You must attend the first class meeting to be considered for enrollment.

NOTE: Each student enrolled in this course is responsible for a materials fee of $100 (paid to the Experimental College before your third class). This fee helps defray such costs associated with making prints as ink, paper, and upkeep. If any individual accepted into the course feels that this fee represents a hardship, he or she should immediately contact Howard Woolf at howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x73384.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Practice elective.

Samuel James is the Program Coordinator for the Program for Narrative and Documentary Practice, housed in the Tufts University Institute for Global Leadership.


EXP-0052-CF: Public Relations and Marketing: Unraveling the Spin
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04024
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Miner 225

What is the formula for mind control? Take a little psychology, a pinch of sociology, a smidge of anthropology, some cognitive analysis, and add a healthy dash of strategic media manipulation. Give a good stir. It's all the ingredients you need to decide a Presidential election, repair the reputation of BP after the Gulf oil spill, make more people buy Hondas than Kias, or choose Coke over Pepsi.

Primarily using case studies, this course will look at the history of public relations and marketing in the US and how it evolved in parallel with our media environment. We will explore how the mechanics of this global mega industry create strategies that influence complex world affairs or simply the toothpaste we use.

Guest speakers from the industry will share their thoughts. Students will work in teams on a final project to solve a PR/marketing challenge by creating their own ads, messages and strategic plans.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Social Sciences elective.

Gail Bambrick is Senior Marketing Communications Writer at Tufts. She uses the written word and strategic planning to focus Tufts' identity and messaging in online, print and web communications. She has also been Director of Publications and Associate Director of Communications and Public Relations for the university as well as the News Media and Public Relations Manager for the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. She holds a Ph.D. from Tufts University in American literature.


EXP-0053-CF: Producing Films for Social Change
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04025
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Braker 2

Are you ready for an intensive, hands-on course that allows you to produce your own news documentaries? Do you care about social issues such as poverty, education, the environment, health care, human rights, gender and race? Are you interested in covering community issues and using documentary film to help inform the public? This course will address the powerful role of video journalism as an advocacy tool to shape perceptions of policy and society. Students will learn the principles and techniques of documentary and TV news magazine journalism including directing, camera work, and editing. Special emphasis will be placed on the role of media ethics, First Amendment principles, and current news events. This course will also emphasize citizenship, active community leadership, and creative approaches to civic engagement. Class enrollment will be limited to sixteen students.

This course represents a partnership between the Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service and the Communications and Media Studies program.

It will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Practice elective.

Dacia Antunes has produced two award-winning documentary films and is committed to teaching documentary film and video production as a way for people to have a voice and document the untold stories in our world. She currently is head of the Media Technology department at Cambridge Rindge & Latin School. She holds a M.F.A. from Boston University in Film Production.


EXP-0054-CF: New Media Practices: Participatory Culture in Communication, Entertainment, and Society
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04026
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Olin 012

With the proliferation of social media platforms, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of ways individuals can define themselves, engage with others, develop communities, and tell their stories. Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, Craigslist, Reddit, Instagram, and Yelp have all had a profound impact on both digital and real-world spaces. New Media Practices will examine these new forms of media from critical, practical, and aesthetic perspectives. Students will examine a variety of areas in which social media has created widespread change, such as community engagement, fan culture, commerce, and personal expression. We will debate the strengths and weaknesses of each medium/platform and explore their cultural significance.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective.

Patrick Johnson has worked as a film and video editor in Los Angeles, cutting a number of independent feature films that have screened at film festivals throughout the world. He is an instructor of film and new media who has taught a Boston University, Tufts University Experimental College, and Keene State College. He received his MFA in Film Production from Boston University.


EXP-0055-F: Birth of the Tube: A History of Early Television

The instructor for this course is no longer able to teach this semester, and the course has been cancelled.


EXP-0059-F: Sports Journalism in the Internet Age
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04133
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 218

The internet has undeniably changed the media landscape, but sports journalism may be feeling the effects greater than any other sphere. Sports enthusiasts have the ability to watch every game on television or their laptops. Fans can find streaming stats on the web, read instant recaps and catch post-game conferences on various sports networks. So how do sports journalists maintain their relevance now – and in the future? Through analyzing the current landscape and studying works of sports journalism, this course will seek to answer this and such related questions as what constitutes quality sports journalism, what is the key to creating work that transcends the 24-hour news cycle, and why is the field percieved as struggling.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Humanities and the Arts elective.

Maria Burns Ortiz is the social media columnist for ESPN.com and a regular sports contributor to Fox News Latino.


EXP-0061-F: Modern Iraq, the Media, and History
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04134
Thursday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Miner 112

What can the twentieth-century history of Iraq tell us about the issues that the country faces today? This course will consider many of the most common, and most vexing, questions about Iraq that have been addressed in the English-language media by journalists, commentators and policymakers since the American-led coalition invasion of Iraq in 2003. These questions will include: is conflict between Sunnis and Shiites perpetual? What about the Kurds' place in Iraq, if any? And aren't Western interventions in Iraq always about the oil?

Each week, we will read at least one media piece published since 2003 on one of these important topics in conjunction with a few texts - usually by historians, but sometimes by political scientists, anthropologists, or even the occasional primary source - that will provide in-depth historical context for the topic and allow us to analyze the contemporary take(s) on it. By emphasizing the critical application of historical perspectives, this course will encourage students to be informed consumers of contemporary media coverage of Iraq.

This course has been approved to count toward the World Civilizations requirement.

Arbella Bet-Shlimon is a College Fellow in History at Harvard University. She recently completed her PhD at Harvard in History and Middle Eastern Studies. She specializes in the political, social, and economic history of modern Iraq and the broader Gulf region.


EXP-0072-S: Law, Journalism & Justice
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04135
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 204

This course explores the intersection of law and journalism. It will employ an in-depth analysis of the clergy sex abuse scandal in the Archdiocese of Boston, as well as a number of wrongful conviction cases. We will explore such questions as: Where do people turn for justice? What happens when the court system fails them? How much can a free press affect the legal system? Students will also engage in legal writing exercises, learning the research techniques employed in the law. And then they will move outside the legal system and become investigative reporters, learning how to gather information effectively, conduct interviews, and present a story in a clear, concise manner.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Social Sciences elective.

Rosalind Kabrhel is an attorney specializing in civil litigation. She worked for the Massachusetts Attorney General's office on the investigation into the clergy sex abuse scandal and served as a Senior Fellow of Law and Justice at the Schuster Institute for Investigative Journalism at Brandeis University.


EXP-0084-F: The Business of Sports: A Study of the NBA
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04136
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Miner 225

Professional sports has evolved from the "mom and pop" environment of 30 years ago, to that of a sophisticated, high risk, high profile, "big business." Current events in pro sports are documented in virtually every major newspaper and periodical in the country. In our daily lives it's hard to avoid exposure to sports in some form or another, yet many off-field issues are confusing to the casual (and maybe not so casual) fan. This course is intended to make sense out of the confusion by providing an overview of the pro sports industry as a business. Subjects for inquiry will include the development of the National Basketball Association from the late 1960s through the present. Assigned readings will be principally from original N.B.A. operational documents, and will provide a fundamental understanding of the concepts, theories, and terms related to general sports business/legal issues, and the N.B.A. in particular.

Jan Volk currently serves as a consultant to a number of N.B.A. teams. After earning a J.D. from Columbia in 1971, he went to work for the Boston Celtics and, in 1984, was named General Manager, a position he held until May 1997. As GM, he was responsible for the acquisition, contractual negotiation, renegotiation, and ultimate signing of all Celtics players.


EXP-0091-AF: Inquiry Teaching Group
0.5 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04030
ARR, 96 Packard Avenue

Inquiry is a global-issues simulation for high school students, and forms an integral part of the year's activities for EPIIC. Students in this course will help design and enact a simulation on Global Health, to be held during the Spring 2013 semester. In the process, students will mentor a high school delegation and prepare them for this simulation — helping them understand all the materials and issues involved.

Heather Barry is the Associate Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts.

Steven Cohen teaches in the Education Department at Tufts.


EXP-0091-F: EPIIC: Global Health
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04031
Tuesday and Thursday, 3:00-5:30 PM, Terrace Room, Paige Hall

This course will be an intensive multifaceted, multidisciplinary probe into historical, scientific, socio-economic, political, philosophical and ethical dimensions of essential challenges and dilemmas of global health. In exploring perplexing and critical questions that shape the future of our world, of our societies, and of our species, we will examine the intersections of health and security and human rights in the broadest sense.

We will explore the dynamics and politics of health disparities; inquire into health and gender issues; the interface between health and poverty, the sources of food insecurity; the complexity of water and disease. What encompasses zoonosis and the intersection of veterinary and human medicine. We will seek to understand the Human Genome Project and probe the future interface between genomics, nanotechnology, and the evolution of our species; what are the ethics and promises of biotechnology? What are the scientific foundations of epidemiology and forensic biology? What is the nature of the pharmaceutical industry - what are the wonders and limitations of drugs; the ethical dilemmas of clinical research, particularly on vulnerable populations? What are the daunting challenges of mental health, PTSD, the threat of bio terrorism, of pandemics. What are the challenges of complex humanitarian interventions; the risk of harm to caretakers and medical professionals? In the context of rapid globalization, we hope to understand the complicated world of global health governance, with a particular focus on the progress toward and continuing viability of the UN's Millennium Development Goals for Health. How can we eradicate the 14 WTO-classified "neglected tropical diseases" and treat the over 1 billion already infected?

In pursuing the answers to these intriguing and critical questions, our students will engage closely with faculty from across all of Tufts' campuses, and with experts from such institutions as the Centers for Disease Control, Partners in Health, Doctors Without Borders, Physicians for Human Rights, and UNICEF.

View a video introduction to this course >

Sherman Teichman is Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts, and the founding director of EPIIC (Education for Public Inquiry and International Citizenship). He holds an M.A. from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.


EXP-0096-F: Auditing for Breadth
0.5-1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04032
ARR

This program is intended to provide students with an opportunity to broaden their education by attending courses in which they might not otherwise enroll. With the approval of the instructors in question, students may elect to audit any three full-credit university courses (or the equivalent) during their four years as an undergraduate. (One course credit is awarded upon completion of the three audits.) Please NOTE: graduating seniors may audit two courses and receive one-half credit.

For more information about this program and an application, contact the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Ave, x73384.

Robyn Gittleman is the Director of the Experimental College.


EXP-0099-CF: Media Internships
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04033
ARR

Supervised internship in communications and mass media. Student can intern at a newspaper, magazine, book publishing company, film production company, television or radio station, advertising or public relations firm, or other media outlet approved by instructor. Students must intern a minimum of 150 hours during the semester (usually 12-16 hours a week), fulfill written assignments, and meet regularly with the instructor. Registration by consent of instructor. Student should consult with instructor prior to researching and applying for internships, and must submit an Internship Agreement signed by the internship site supervisor prior to being allowed to register.

Please NOTE: Enrollment is by consent only. For more information, contact the instructor, Susan Eisenhauer, at susan.eisenhauer@tufts.edu.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Practice elective.

Susan Eisenhauer (J '71) holds a M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Among other responsibilities, she directs the Communications internship program, supervising more than 90 students each year who intern for credit at various media organizations.


EXP-0101-CF: Advanced Filmmaking
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04035
ARR

Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who have completed EXP-0056-CS: Making Movies – or who are able to demonstrate equivalent competence – can continue their training as filmmakers. Students who initially qualify will present a business plan for their project and, if accepted, will receive credit, access to TuftsFilmWorks' production and editing equipment, and a supervised context within which to work. In return, they agree to watch a negotiated number of source films, keep a Producer's Log, and write a final assessment, taking into account both the process they went through to produce their film and their reaction to the film once it is done.

Please NOTE: Enrollment is by consent only. For information on eligibility and registration, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x73384.

Advanced Filmmaking is supported by the generosity of Lisa and Bruce Cohen (J'86 and A'83, respectively).

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Practice elective.

Howard Woolf is Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks (the ExCollege's filmmaking center), co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.


EXP-0102-CF: Advanced Electronic and Digital Media
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04036
ARR

Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who are able to demonstrate an appropriate degree of competence can continue their training in the multimedia arts.

Please NOTE: Enrollment is by consent only. For information on eligibility and registration, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x73384.

This course will count toward Media Practice credit for the Multimedia Arts minor and for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Howard Woolf is Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks (the ExCollege's filmmaking center), co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.


EXP-0192-F: Independent Study
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04039
ARR

By arrangement only. For more information, come by the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Avenue, or call x73384.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0192-PF: Independent Study
0.5-1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04040
ARR

By arrangement only. For more information, come by the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Avenue, or call x73384.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.

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Courses Open Only to Designated Students


EXP-0007-F: Writing Fellowship Seminar
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04019
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Miner 225

This course has been the required training for all new undergraduate Writing Fellows since 1999. Most universities of a comparable size and caliber of Tufts require a training course for peer writing tutors, but this ExCollege course is unique in that new tutors take the course during their first semester as tutors. After an initial orientation held before the semester begins, the course provides a theoretical framework, practical skills, and a support group for new tutors while they are learning how to become good tutors. The purpose of holding the class during instead of or before the first semester of tutoring is to reinforce the importance of self-reflection as a necessary part of any teaching practice, especially peer tutoring. The class, then, becomes a community of writers: peers supporting peers as writers and novice writing tutors. Hence, the title of "writing fellow" emphasizes the "fellowship" that is an essential and unique aspect of Tufts' Writing Fellows Program.

Kristina Aikens is an Assistant Director for Writing Resources at the Tufts University Academic Resource Center. She holds a Ph.D. in English from Tufts.


EXP-0090-AF: Teaching an Explorations Seminar
1.5 credits, Pass/Fail, Call #04027
ARR, ExCollege Conference Room

This course is designed to facilitate undergraduate team-teaching for those leading first-semester seminars for incoming first-year students. Weekly group meetings will be held, in which student teachers will be exposed to a range of teaching techniques and theories, asked to articulate their course goals, and given a forum for discussing the unique problems that new teachers often encounter. Students will be required to keep journals, and reflect upon the concerns and questions that arise over the course of the semester.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0090-BF: Teaching a Perspectives Seminar
1.5 credits, Pass/Fail, Call #04028
Monday, 12:00-1:15 PM, Eaton 206

Similar to the Explorations Seminar, this course supports students teaching a Perspectives course, all of whom will work under the umbrella topic of movies as both art and industry.

Howard Woolf, Associate Director of the Experimental College, coordinates the Perspectives program.


EXP-0090-TF: Teaching Assistant Workshop
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04029
ARR

This course is designed to assist the undergraduates who are teaching assistants for courses in the Experimental College.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0190-BF: CMS Senior Colloquium
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04037
Wednesday, 12:00-12:50 PM, Eaton 206

All C.M.S. seniors thinking about completing a Senior Project must register for one of the two sections of the C.M.S. Senior Colloquium. The colloquium aims to help seniors develop their ideas, provides them with a forum for sharing resources and work strategies, and trains them in the scheduling and time management procedures necessary for successful completion of projects.

Please note: Registration for this course will be done in person with CMS Director Julie Dobrow. Come to her office at 95 Talbot Ave on Tuesday, Sept. 4, between 9:00 am and 2:00 pm.

Leslie Goldberg (J '84), the instructor for section BF, is the founder of Blue Sun Communications, a corporate communications consulting firm. Among her clients are the Tufts University College of Engineering. She holds a M.S. in Mass Communication from Boston University.


EXP-0190-CF: CMS Senior Colloquium
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04038
Thursday, 9:30-10:20 AM, Eaton 206

All C.M.S. seniors thinking about completing a Senior Project must register for one of the two sections of the C.M.S. Senior Colloquium. The colloquium aims to help seniors develop their ideas, provides them with a forum for sharing resources and work strategies, and trains them in the scheduling and time management procedures necessary for successful completion of projects.

Please note: Registration for this course will be done in person with CMS Director Julie Dobrow. Come to her office at 95 Talbot Ave on Tuesday, Sept. 4, between 9:00 am and 2:00 pm.

Julie Dobrow is Director of the Communications and Media Studies and the Media and Public Service programs at Tufts. She holds a Ph.D. in Communications from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania.