Courses

Spring 2011 Courses

Registration for these courses will begin at 9:00am on the first day of Spring classes, Thursday, January 20, 2011. Registration will continue for open courses until 5pm on Thursday, February 3. This page was last updated 1/20/11.


Courses Open to All Students


EXP-0005-S: Conversational Hindi
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04331
Monday and Wednesday, 6:00-7:15 PM, Olin 107


The focus of this course is to learn to speak and respond in Hindi. The class atmosphere will be purposefully light and playful. Students will gain basic social command for travel and work purposes and will have the opportunity to speak and respond multiple times in a variety of exercises in each class. We will draw from Bollywood film dialogue to stimulate our conversations and will cover critical basic grammar and syntax.

Harriotte Hurie spent seven years studying and researching the classical vocal music of North India in areas where Hindi is the dominant language. Dr. Hurie has taught conversational Hindi at Wesleyan University and, currently, she tutors Hindi on a private basis.


EXP-0006-S: Medical Spanish
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04332
Monday and Wednesday, 6:00-7:15 PM, Lane 100A


This course provides an overview of the practice of Spanish-language medical interpretation. Students will build their skills in communication, ethics, and medical vocabulary, including psychology and psychiatry, while exploring questions of culture and advocacy. This course offers students an opportunity to practice interpretation in a simulated medical setting by emphasizing the following areas: bilingual fluency for social and medical conversation; interpreting skills and techniques; the code of ethics for medical interpreters (in relation to that of doctors); health beliefs and practices in a range of Spanish-speaking cultures; and cross-cultural communications challenges in the medical setting. Instruction is geared toward students with intermediate to advanced language skills, and will reinforce students' prior knowledge of Spanish grammar. This course will be taught in Spanish.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Josep Vicente is currently a medical interpreter with Medical Interpreters of the North Shore. Born and raised in Spain, he holds a degree in Romance Languages and Linguistics from the Universitat de Barcelona.


EXP-0007-S: Harry Potter and Christian Thought
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04333
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Bromfield-Pearson 06


Is Dumbledore a God-figure, or is he Merlin recreated in our times? Is he neither because the Harry Potter books are just a children's series intended for entertainment rather than allusion to other literary works? Is the reading of theological archetypes into Rowling's series present or imposed upon the text?

To start thinking about these and other related questions, this class will look at a whole range of ideas about Christian theology that, taken together, create the underpinnings of what Christians think about God. Once the class in conversant in the theology, we will then look at these ideas alongside the Harry Potter books. The central goal of this course is to ask whether the Harry Potter books espouse a Christian theological worldview, and if so, to what extent? Our study may show that they do. It may reveal that they do not. Regardless of the outcome, it will be our task to probe this question in detail.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This class has been approved by the Religion Department to count toward the Humanities distribution requirement

Danielle Tumminio is the author of the newly published God and Harry Potter at Yale, which tells the story of her work at Yale teaching a course on Christian Theology and the Harry Potter series. In addition, she has held teaching positions at the University of New Haven and Central Connecticut State University and is ordained in the Episcopal Church.


EXP-0014-S: Dark Comedy on Page, Stage, and Screen
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04334
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Bromfield-Pearson 07


Horace is believed to have posed the question, "What prevents him who says the truth from laughing?" What happens, though, if the truth is painful? Do we still laugh? The world of comedy is often an inherently tragic one, made comic by a microscopic twist in circumstance or outcome.

This course will examine the interplay between comedy and suffering in a number of arenas, taking examples from theatre, film, television, stand-up comedy, and literature. Using cultural, political and social critique to examine the historical background of a select number of difficult moments in history, this course will explore the ways in which comedians – from Aristophanes to Dave Chappelle – have used humor as a means of coping and survival. Topics will range from the personal, such as the comedy of heartbreak, to the global, as with the comic responses to the atrocities of World War II, in an attempt to understand why comedy is such a powerful tool of survival, and how we see it at play in our lives today.

This course counts as a Humanities and Arts elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor and a Film Criticism elective for the Film Studies minor.

This class has been approved by the Department of Drama and Dance to count toward the Arts distribution requirement.

A.J. Knox has written and presented on such disparate but nonetheless central figures and motives in the history of comedy as Alfred Jarry, Richard Pryor, and the Black Arts Movement. He is currently a doctoral candidate in the Drama Department at Tufts. His research interests include "Pataphysics," Buddhism in Western theater, and comedy studies.


EXP-0016-S: Martial Arts: History, Philosophy, and Life
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04335
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Aidekman 12


The fighting arts have been practiced for as long as humans have needed to defend themselves. However, key philosophical principles, ones that guide the martial arts, extend beyond mere combat. Indeed, martial arts texts are read for strategies in business, and martial arts schools often claim to be pathways for self-actualization.

This course will examine the concepts underlying such beliefs by studying the history and philosophies of various Asian martial arts. Our discussions will focus primarily on readings of classical martial art texts such as Musahi's Book of Five Rings and Sun Tzu's Art of War, among others. These primary texts will be supplemented with important scholarly writings on the subject. Not only will we discuss the role of these philosophical systems for combat, but the class will aim to show students how they can apply these principles in their daily lives.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course has been approved by the World Civilizations committee to count toward World Civilizations credit.

Neil Cohn has over 17 years of martial arts experience, including Soo Bahk Do, Tai Chi, Aikido, and Shorinji Kempo. He is a certified master instructor and 4th Dan in Soo Bahk Do. Neil is currently an advanced doctoral student in the Psychology Department at Tufts and teaches Soo Bahk Do and Tai Chi here as well.


EXP-0019-S: Research for Success: Using the Library for Thesis and Capstone Projects
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04119
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Tisch 223


PLEASE NOTE: This is an eight-week course beginning on Tuesday, February 1.

Are you thinking about writing an honors thesis your senior year? Would you like to get a head start or immediate help understanding the research process? Would you enjoy sharing what you learn as you become an expert in the subject area you are investigating?

This course has successfully introduced numbers of Tufts students to the major research tools and techniques at an intermediate-to-advanced level specific to their subject area. Each student will also develop a working bibliography of resources, as well as a plan for continuing his/her research.

Regina Raboin is the Science Reference Librarian and Reference Microforms/Current Periodicals Coordinator at Tisch Library.

Laurie Sabol is the Coordinator of Library Instruction at Tisch Library.


EXP-0022-S: Mechanics and Design: Making Beautiful Things that Move
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04336
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Aidekman 13


This course will be equal parts kinetic sculpture, interactive art, mechanism design, and geometry. We will work to develop an eye for seeing and understanding the mechanisms in our everyday lives (e.g., the zippers on our coats, the gears on our bicycles, and the caps on our pens) and then use these observations to develop our intuition for how to engineer and build our own kinetic sculptures and mechanical designs.

We will look for inspiration while exploring the work of other artists, designers, and engineers – such as Arthur Ganson and Theo Jansen. At the same time, we will focus on developing an intuitive understanding of how things move through building prototypes and creating computer simulations.

The course will culminate in the design, construction, and installation of participants' mechanical artworks.

This class has been approved by the Department of Art and Art History to count toward the Arts distribution requirement.

Shaunalynn Duffy is a co-founder and principal at sprout, an education and research organization devoted to creating and supporting the community-driven investigation of science. Her interest in mechanisms and public performance began with designing and building parade floats, gallery exhibits, street performance pieces, and other public installations, and has led to an interest in simulation, modeling, and building. Most recently, she was part of a team that constructed a twelve-foot-tall, eighteen-foot-wide walking sculpture which debuted at the 2010 HONK! Festival.


EXP-0028-S: Alpinismo: The Culture and Science of Mountain Climbing
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04337
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00-7:15 PM, Aidekman 12


Why do humans feel the need to travel into and immerse themselves in the highest and harshest environments on the planet?

This course presents the history of alpinism and how it has developed into one of the most extreme endeavors humans have undertaken. It will also include the practical skills of rock, ice, and mountaineering, as well as theoretical, philosophical and alpine environmentalist perspectives. Through skills practice, presentations, guest lecturers, reading responses, discussions, and a final expedition planning project, students will thoroughly explore the art of mountaineering.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Nick Levin is a senior majoring in Biology at Tufts. An accomplished climber of rock and ice, he has summited more than twenty-five peaks in North America with altitudes over 14,000 feet. He is an Eagle Scout and holds a Wilderness EMT certificate.

Ryan Stolp is a senior majoring in Psychology at Tufts. He has moutaineered in the Andes, Patagonia, Cascades, Rockies, and White Mountains. He is a NOLS certified Leave No Trace trainer and has completed their Outdoor Educators program.


EXP-0030-S: Sabermetrics: The Objective Analysis of Baseball
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04338
Thursday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Anderson 309


This course will teach the fundamentals of the emerging science of Sabermetrics, the objective analysis of baseball. We will discuss baseball, not through conventional wisdom and consensus, but by searching for real knowledge concerning the game of baseball. Hitting, pitching, fielding performance, along with other areas of sabermetrics, will be analyzed and better understood with the current and historical baseball data. Students will design and implement their own sabermetric research study, learning the important concepts in statistics and statistical analysis needed to perform this research.

Andy Andres (N '99) is an Assistant Professor of Natural Science at Boston University, a Data Analyst at BaseballHQ.com, and a die-hard Red Sox fan.


EXP-0033-S: Piracies: History and Representation of Plunder in the Modern World
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04339
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Braker 222


Since humans began trading goods by ship, there have been those raiding ships at sea. Known as piracy, this form of raiding has been the impetus for wars, peace treaties, laws, and political wrangling. Today, piracy is globally important: we see a definition of piracy that includes electronic media and many nations face persistent problems of real sea-raiding off the Horn of Africa.

This interdisciplinary seminar investigates the history of, and our conceptions about, piracy from the sixteenth century to the present. What does (and what did) piracy look like? What did it mean to be a pirate? And how do we portray pirates (in history, film, and literature) and why? We will explore primary source accounts of plundering voyages from the "golden age" of piracy, try to imagine piracy from the perspective of writers and intellectuals, read the scholarship about present-day piracies, and watch the image of the pirate unfold on the big screen.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

John Coakley was recently awarded a Newberry Renaissance Consortium Grant to further his research. He is an advanced doctoral student studying English pirates and privateers of the seventeenth century at the University of Wisconsin-Madison's History Department.


EXP-0034-S: Psychology, Magic, and Performance
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04340
Monday and Wednesday, 6:00-7:15 PM, TBD


This course will introduce students to an exploration of the psychology that makes magic work and makes it an entertaining art. As such, it combines study with performance.While specific techniques will be taught, the focus of the class is an analysis of how the techniques and psychological cues work together. To further the understanding of performance we will also briefly examine the history and evolution of technique, as well as examine how these concepts apply to other non-performance situations. In addition to a discussion of relevant theory, throughout the semester students will be preparing to perform short, close-up magic routines.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Marcell Babai is a senior majoring in Quantitative Economics at Tufts. He has been practicing magic for over ten years and performing semi-professionally for the past six years. In 2009, Marcell received the Society of American Magicians Chicago competition First Place and Audience Choice awards.


EXP-0035-AS: Rape Aggression Defense
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04341
Tuesday, 4:30-6:30 PM, TBD


The Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.) is based on the philosophy of choices: "to develop and enhance the OPTIONS of self defense, so that they become more viable considerations for the woman who is attacked."

While it is completely natural to resist, unless a woman is trained to do so, the resistance she attempts may be futile. This course will try to strengthen innate survival techniques by making more options available. Preparation through education and training is usually the best way to survive an assault situation.

Issues that will be addressed include awareness and prevention, sexual assault definitions, patterns of encounter, the decision to resist, basic principles of self-defense, and the defensive mindset. This course will end with realistic simulation training.

Corporal Mark J. Roche is a member of the Tufts University Police Department and certified as an instructor in both the Basic and Advanced Rape Aggression Defense programs. He has been teaching RAD at Tufts since 2002 and has certified over 500 students, staff and faculty.


EXP-0035-BS: Rape Aggression Defense
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04342
Wednesday, 4:30-6:30 PM, Sophia Gordon


The Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.) is based on the philosophy of choices: "to develop and enhance the OPTIONS of self defense, so that they become more viable considerations for the woman who is attacked."

While it is completely natural to resist, unless a woman is trained to do so, the resistance she attempts may be futile. This course will try to strengthen innate survival techniques by making more options available. Preparation through education and training is usually the best way to survive an assault situation.

Issues that will be addressed include awareness and prevention, sexual assault definitions, patterns of encounter, the decision to resist, basic principles of self-defense, and the defensive mindset. This course will end with realistic simulation training.

Corporal Mark J. Roche is a member of the Tufts University Police Department and certified as an instructor in both the Basic and Advanced Rape Aggression Defense programs. He has been teaching RAD at Tufts since 2002 and has certified over 500 students, staff and faculty.


EXP-0036-S: Advanced Rape Aggression Defense
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04343
Thursday, 4:00-6:00 PM, Sophia Gordon


Advanced Rape Aggression Defense (Advanced RAD) is a continuation of the Basic program and answers a lot of the "what if" questions. The program will begin with a review of the basic program followed by simulation.

This course is more hands on than the basic program and includes topics such as defending against multiple attackers and defense against weapons such as knives and guns. Throughout the course, the instructors will conduct realistic simulation training using impact targets and facilitate discussions on sexual assault, crime prevention and personal protection.

Corporal Mark J. Roche is a member of the Tufts University Police Department and certified as an instructor in both the Basic and Advanced Rape Aggression Defense programs. He has been teaching RAD at Tufts since 2002 and has certified over 500 students, staff and faculty.


EXP-0037-S: Investigations in Hypnosis
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04344
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00-7:15 PM, Bromfield-Pearson 07


Have you ever gone to a hypnotist show and seen your friends cluck like chickens? Maybe you thought it was a fluke or wrote it off to voodoo science. Well, not so! Hypnosis is a legitimate field that is often neglected by mainstream psychology curriculums.

This class is here to rectify that. In this course students will take a closer look at how hypnosis actually works. We will cover a variety of materials, providing students with an intimate knowledge of the history and science behind hypnosis, as well as an understanding of possible clinical applications and contemporary research on the subject.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Aliza Howitt is a junior in the Psychology Department at Tufts with particular research expertise in hypnosis.


EXP-0038-S: Counterculture Judaism: A Revolution (Still) in the Making
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04345
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Hillel Center

This class will look at the ways in which post-holocaust American Jewish life has created a revolution in terms of its relationship to authority, tradition, community and practice. We'll use the tools of history, anthropology, philosophy, visual art and sociology to look at various movements in contemporary Jewish life from the 1960s to today: the hippie-influenced Havurah movement, feminism, queer and transgender Jewish expression, the independent minyan (prayer group) phenomenon, the impact of punk and the Internet, a new wave of engagement with social justice, and the appropriation of ostensibly anti-embellishment Jewish forms by the Jewish mainstream.

We'll think about ritual, theology, creative liturgy, spiritual expression, politics, and how and why a "do-it yourself" ethos impacts one's experience of Jewish life. We'll also look at the ways in which the "emergent church" movement in Christianity in some ways mirrors this powerfully impactful Jewish phenomenon.

This class has been approved by the Religion Department to count toward the Humanities distribution requirement and by the Judaic Studies program to count toward either major or minor credit.

Rabbi Danya Ruttenberg is Senior Jewish Educator at Tufts Hillel, the author of Surprised by God: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Religion, and an editor for both Yentl's Revenge: The Next Wave of Jewish Feminism and The Passionate Torah: Sex and Judaism.


EXP-0039-S: Consumption, Marketing, and Happiness
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04346
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Barnum 114


Why is one purse more expensive than another of equal size, shape and material? Why and how does branding make us willing to pay the differential? Why does form trump function, and why are we willing to pay for it?

This course is an exploration of the psychology at work in consumerism and materialism. We will look at consumption historically, taking note of continuities and changes in patterns of marketing and buying over a number of generations. We will consider how class and geography come to bear on consumption. We will also look at economic classes and the impact of geographic location on consumption. And finally, special attention will be paid to the impact that consumption has had on the earth -- both culturally and environmentally.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course counts as a Social Sciences elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Christin Walth has been both a professor of marketing and a professional practitioner in the field for over twenty years. She has been a resident or long-term guest of numerous countries in Europe, Asia, and South America where she observed and studied consumption patterns and material aspirations for different socio-economic levels in a variety of cultures.


EXP-0040-S: Positive Psychology: Theory and Application
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04348
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Anderson 309


Strange as it may seem, science has lately turned its lens toward what makes us happy and how we can live well.

This class will introduce students to the field where much of this work is being done, that of Positive Psychology, and will begin to familiarize them with the research behind the science of happiness. We will focus on interventions that have been proven to impact the growth and development of college students and will require students to practice new strategies to make them happier. Course topics will include (but are not limited to) the study of character strengths, the science of happiness, goal setting, optimism, gratitude, and science-based positive psychology interventions.

Deb Levy is an award-winning Teaching Fellow in the Psychology Department at Harvard University and was the Head Teaching Fellow in Professor Tal Ben-Shahar's extremely popular Positive Psychology course from 2007-2009. Currently she specializes in coaching individuals and businesses, and her clients have included Tufts University Health Services, the MIT Center for Work and Family Life, the Harvard University Divinity School, and the University of Maine women's basketball team.


EXP-0042-S: The Right to Privacy in Modern America
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04350
Thursday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Olin 116


An individual's right to marry? A woman's right to choose? Warrantless wiretapping? The right to bear arms? The right to die? Each and every one of these issues, and far more, have arisen before the United States Supreme court in recent years, expanding and contracting the breadth and scope of our right to privacy. Even in a new era of government, the scope of the right to privacy remains at the forefront of the collective American conscience.

This course will explore how Constitutional law has shaped the nature of the right to privacy and how the right may be evolving in modern America. We will concentrate on three particular areas: (1) privacy rights specifically enumerated in the Constitution, (2) privacy rights that have been read into the constitution, and (3) emerging ideas that may necessitate the extension or expansion of historically established concepts of privacy.

Douglas Martland is an Assistant Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He previously clerked for the Honorable Justice Gary Katzmann of the Massachusetts Appeals Court and for the judges of the Superior Court of Massachusetts.

Steve Sharobem is an Assistant Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He previously clerked for the Honorable Justice William Cowin of the Massachusetts Appeals Court and for the judges of the Superior Court of Massachusetts.


EXP-0043-S: The Psychology of Religious Conflict and Peace
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04351
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, East 015


Do religious differences inevitably lead to conflict? Many of the major global conflicts that have taken place in the last century have been motivated by religion. At the same time, religion has been a great force for peace and the establishment of moral and ethical standards.

In this course students will investigate the causes of religious conflict and peace. They will study sacred texts from the world's religions and empirical studies on the psychological effects of religious identity. And at the same time, they will also examine topics ranging from terrorism to the power of faith-based diplomacy. In addition, working in groups, students will select one major conflict to research from a social psychological standpoint, using this perspective to understand the causes of global violence and to begin preparing themselves for roles of global leadership.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course has been approved by the Peace and Justice Studies program to count as an elective, toward either the major or certificate.

Negin Toosi studies conflict and intergroup relations across a number of social identities. She recently co-taught the ExCollege course Environmental Action: Shifting from Saying to Doing. She is an advanced doctoral candidate in the Psychology Department at Tufts.


EXP-0044-S: Crisis Mapping: Technology, Resources, and Disaster Relief
0.5 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04352
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Eaton 203


This is a half-credit course that will meet every other week throughout the semester, beginning on Tuesday, February 1. There will be an information session on Tuesday, January 25 at 6:30 pm.

Crisis mapping is an emerging interdisciplinary field that uses technology to aid in the response to humanitarian emergencies. As the world takes notice of the dramatic new possibilities opened up by these tools, there is a rapidly growing need for skilled professionals who understand both how to implement crisis mapping platforms in their work, and the broader implications of applying mapping technologies within various contexts of international social change.

This course aims to teach students about the field and equip them with the skills to use the most important crisis mapping tools. It will also survey, around the world, how crisis mapping technologies are being applied to an increasingly wide range of scenarios, including the monitoring of elections and human rights abuses, citizen journalist mobilization, conflict tracking, and aid evaluation.

Finally, students will become part of a growing global network of skilled 'crisis mappers.'

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Jennifer Catalano has held a number of project and program management positions in the NGO and private sectors. Currently she is a second year Masters student at the Fletcher School studying Humanitarian Studies and Human Security with a focus on the intersection between development, humanitarian aid, and human rights.

Roz Sewell is a founding member and New Media Consultant for Konpa Group. She was the Director of Crisis Mapping for the Ushahidi Haiti Project, and she is obtaining her Masters of Arts from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy.


EXP-0045-S: Katrina/New Orleans: The Politics and Policies of Recovery
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04347
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Tisch 316


What can we learn from the efforts to rebuild New Orleans after Katrina?

In this course, students will explore this and such related questions as: Do natural disaster present an opportunity to improve prior conditions? Do planners have a "blank slate" after a disaster? Are they freed from the constraints that they would otherwise face, ones having to do with the myriad aspects that a city's fabric acquires over time?

We will also consider the variety of challenges facing today's city building efforts (from neighborhood reaction to environmental impact to technical and financial feasibility) and ask whether or not these concerns are magnified in the aftermath of a significant natural disaster. Finally we will grapple with the need for quick response, especially at a time when institutional capacity in fostering city building efforts are seriously diminished.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course has been approved by the Peace and Justice Studies program to count as an elective, toward either the major or certificate. It will also count toward the Environmental Studies major, Track III: Environment and Society.

Victor Karen is an urban planning and development consultant who spent two and half years engaged with various city building efforts in New Orleans following Hurricane Katrina. He has over twenty-five years of real estate experience in both the private and public sectors, including eleven years at the Boston Redevelopment Association and four years at MassDevelopment.

Thomas J. O'Malley is currently Director of Veterans Housing for the AFL-CIO Housing Investment Trust (HIT), which provides investment capital focusing on affordable and workforce housing production throughout the country. Previously, Tom served for four years after Hurricane Katrina as the Director of the AFL-CIO HIT Gulf Coast Revitalization Program headquartered in New Orleans.


EXP-0046-S: Future Philanthropists
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04353
Monday and Wednesday, 4:30-5:45 PM, Aidekman 9


If you had the opportunity to provide funding to local nonprofit organizations, how would you make your decision, and why? Now you actually have a chance to find out!

Students in this course will examine the role and responsibility of both the non-profit sector and philanthropy in modern American society. We will discuss challenges facing those providing funding to and fundraising for non-profit organizations, and we will develop a giving model that will result in our granting a total of $10,000 to local nonprofit organizations.

This course is supported by the Highland Street Foundation's Youth Philanthropy Initiative.

Amanda Sonis Glynn (A '00) is a Lecturer in the Sociology Department at Tufts. She is also a Career Advisor for Commongood Careers, a non-profit executive search firm. She holds a J.D. from Harvard Law School.


EXP-0048-S: The Power of Persuasion and the People Who Persuade
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04354
Thursday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Miner 224


Words have power. Great words have great power. And great words delivered well have tremendous power.

This course will look at significant speeches from Abraham Lincoln and Franklin Delano Roosevelt to Barack Obama and John McCain. We will consider why these speeches are significant and will look carefully at how the men and women who delivered these speeches did so. Students will examine the combination of literacy, the physical ability to deliver the speech and a generous touch of showmanship that all combine to persuade, to cajole and to compel.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course counts as a Humanities and Arts elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Jeffrey Simon is Director of Infrastructure Development for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He is also President of Simon Properties, a real estate development company. He holds a Master of City Planning from Harvard University and began his career as a Legislative Aide for former State Senator William M. Bulger.


EXP-0050-S:JFK Through the Looking Glass: Representations of the Kennedy Image
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04355
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Braker 225


John F. Kennedy is considered to be the first American politician to have fully grasped and used the potential of visual media for politics. And given the advantageous relationship he enjoyed with the camera and the privileged place of cinema in the American entertainment industry, it has come as no surprise that the American public's interest in John F. Kennedy's life, career and tragic death has manifested itself to a surprising degree in this powerful medium.

This course will use a number of disciplines to explore John F. Kennedy's posthumous relationship with moving pictures. In particulare, we will consider the construction of the JFK image in one popular film genre: feature docudrama. The class will focus on describing the Kennedy image, defining docudrama, the impact of John F. Kennedy's political persona on American politics, and the pervasiveness of the docudramatic pattern of storytelling from Hollywood to news broadcasting and talk shows.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course counts as a Humanities and Arts elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor and as a Film Studies elective for the Film Studies minor.

Raluca Lucia Cimpean brings a European perspective to bear on the analysis of American culture. She has taught at Babes-Bolyai University in Romania and at Heidelberg University in Germany. She received her Ph.D. from the Heidelberg Center for American Studies.


EXP-0051-S:HBO's The Wire: TV and the American Inner City
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04356
Monday and Wednesday, 6:00-7:15 PM, Miner 112


HBO's The Wire has been called "a display … that must be considered alongside the best literature and filmmaking in the modern era."

Through close analysis of of key episodes, this course will use The Wire to explore the societal and institutional processes that shape and influence the lives of inner-city Americans. We will journey through the first four of The Wire's five seasons, examining the politics, societal influences, and institutional practices that affect the lives of the urban poor.

Readings will accompany viewings of the program, examining topics such as community policing, the economics of drug trade, the loss of jobs in America, underrepresented subcultures, and undocumented labor. The different academic viewpoints will provide a view into a disenfranchised community, located in the center of the American city. Participation and discussion will provide the fuel for the course.

Alex Hart is a senior at Tufts majoring in Clinical Psychology and minoring in Roman Civilization. Alex first discovered The Wire during his senior year in high school and has been thinking about and planning this course since his first year at Tufts. He has taught students from underrepresented communities during each of the past two summers, at an adolescent inpatient psychiatry unit in New York, and through a San Francisco program offering free summer education to motivated middle schoolers.


EXP-0052-S:YouTube Culture: The Theory and Practice of Web Video
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04357
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 202


Web video is fast becoming the dominant source for media consumption in contemporary culture. Yet, the form and content of web video is entirely unique when compared to traditional forms of media.

This course examines the vast sea of web video from both theoretical and critical perspectives. Students will engage in debate over copyright law and remix culture, explore the cultural significance of memes and "viral videos," and analyze the ways which internet video is interacting with the realms of television, visual art, business, politics, and fandom. Furthermore, students will learn practical production skills and make their own videos, ones that examine and critique relevant areas of study. In short, the class will engage in the forms and culture of the online video community to both better understand it and potentially shape it.

This course counts as a Humanities and Arts elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor and as a Film Studies elective for the Film Studies minor.

Patrick Johnson works as a film and video editor in Los Angeles and has cut a number of independent feature films that have screened at film festivals throughout the world. He has also taught film and new media at the Experimental College, Boston University, and Keene State College. He received his MFA in Film Production from Boston University.


EXP-0055-CS: Multimedia Journalism for the 21st Century
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04122
Monday, 1:30-4:00 PM, Rabb Room


To paraphrase Thomas Jefferson, a healthy democracy depends on an informed electorate. It remains the central role of the journalist to provide reliable information to the public, and it is a job made more challenging by the sheer volume of information available today.

In this course, students will learn by doing: students will put themselves in the role of the journalist with projects in which they will have to gather reliable primary source information, assimilate it, condense it, and create compelling content for print, broadcast, and internet media. In doing so, we will examine how the role of the journalist has remained the same even as the requirements of the job have evolved. Questions to be considered include: What exactly is a multimedia journalist or a "cross-platform content provider"? Is information communicated differently on different platforms? And what are the skills required of the journalist going forward?

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

HIGH DEMAND. In order to be considered for enrollment, you MUST attend the first class meeting at 1:30pm on Monday, January 24.

This course counts as a Humanities and Arts elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Anthony Everett is a multiple Emmy and National Headliner Award recipient who currently hosts "Chronicle", the nightly television newsmagazine of WCVB-TV, the ABC affiliate in Boston. Everett is a 1983 graduate of Tufts and former Editor-in-Chief of the Tufts Daily. He has been a broadcast journalist since 1984 and has covered news, politics, and human interest stories across America and around the world.


EXP-0056-CS: Making Movies
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04123
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Braker 002


What does it take to be a filmmaker? Are you ready to make the commitment?

This course will immerse students in the practice and logic associated with camera, lighting, audio and editing – all in the service of learning how to tell a story cinematically. Working in teams, students will complete a series of small projects aimed at developing their technical and stylistic skills. At the same time, they will engage in analyses of filmmakers whose styles and methods are not far removed from that of the class.

The teams will then produce original short features, the last of which will be exhibited in a public screening at semester's end.

HIGH DEMAND. In order to be considered for enrollment, you MUST attend the first class meeting at 6:30pm on Thursday, January 20, in Braker 001.

This course counts as a Humanities and Arts elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor, as a Film Studies elective for the Film Studies minor, and Media Practice credit for the Multimedia Arts minor.

Don Schechter (A '01, M '03) is the founder of Charles River Media Group, a Boston-based production company. He is currently co-producer, cinematographer, editor, and composer for an independent feature film called Marranos and has worked on numerous projects for such clients as The Rolling Stones, A&E, NBC, and The New York Times. Segments from his recent, award-winning documentary, A Good Whack, were aired on MSNBC and the BBC.


EXP-0057-CS: Media Law and Ethics
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04124
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Anderson 306


Legal and ethical issues and evolutions in technology have always shaped how Americans get (or don't get) the news, from politically fueled rumors about Thomas Jefferson in 18th century newspapers to such paparazzi-fueled web sites as TMZ.com today.

This course will examine issues of law and ethics that affect journalists and, more importantly, the public that the press is supposed to inform. It will review the political, historic and philosophical roots of the First Amendment and offer an overview of key issues in press law, including libel, anonymous sources, and the free press/fair trial dilemma. Building on that foundation, the course will explore related ethical issues including the public's right to know versus an individual's right to privacy. All topics will be viewed in the context of the internet, cell phones, social networking and other, as yet unforeseen, digital technology.

This course counts as a Social Sciences elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Phil Primack (A '70) is a longtime journalist who has covered politics, the economy and a range of other public policy topics. His work has appeared in The New York Times, The Boston Globe, CommonWealth, Boston, and Columbia Journalism Review. He has also been a policy adviser to elected officials, including former congressman, Joe Kennedy.


EXP-0058-CS: Social Marketing
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04125
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Crane Room


Advertisers use our emotions to convince us we need more – and more expensive—stuff. But the same marketing that drives our consumer lust for the material world can also make us care about and invest in social causes, moral constructs and political ideologies.

In this course, we will explore the influence of marketing tactics and learn how to create strategies that can change public opinion and generate new thinking and action in arenas that include the environment, global development, animal welfare, human health, education and politics. Do we choose our causes the same way we choose our cars?

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course counts as a Social Sciences elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Gail Bambrick is Senior Marketing Communications Writer at Tufts. She uses the written word and strategic planning to focus Tufts' identity and messaging in online, print and web communications. She has also been Director of Publications and Associate Director of Communications and Public Relations for the university as well as the News Media and Public Relations Manager for the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. She earned her Ph.D. at Tufts in American literature.


EXP-0059-CS: Something Old to Something New: Archival and Found Footage in Documentary Filmmaking
0.5 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04358
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Aidekman 9


Please Note: This is a half-credit course that begins on March 2nd and meets weekly through the end of the semester.

This course will explore how documentary filmmakers have utilized archival and found footage in powerful ways. Through screening of relevant films, including the instructor's own work, and in-depth discussion of editing and other production techniques, students will learn how old footage can be restored and presented in innovative new ways.

Students will also learn about the placement of non-fiction films in theatres and television, the ins and outs of film festivals and the marketing of documentaries.

This course counts as a Humanities and Arts elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor and as a Film Studies elective for the Film Studies minor.

Yael Hersonski is the director of the critcally acclaimed A Film Unfinished, a documentary that deconstructs an earlier film, a Nazi propaganda film made about the Warsaw Ghetto. She is Filmmaker-in-residence for the Communications and Media Studies program at Tufts this semester.


EXP-0062-S:The Concerned Photographer
0.5 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04359
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 204


Please Note: This is a half-credit course that will meet every other week throughout the semester.

"The concerned photographer finds much in the present unacceptable which he tries to alter. Our goal is simply to let the world also know why it is unacceptable." - Cornell Capa

The purpose of this course is to encourage students to think about using photographic images to establish a point of view. It will be a retrospective of the development of concerned photography, its rise and decline. Students will explore the work of a broad range of photographers, learn how to analyze perspectives, and develop their own story over the course of the class.
This course counts as a Social Sciences elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Gary Knight is a renowned photojournalist whose work – from South East Asia to Yugoslavia to Iraq and Afghanistan – has been published, exhibited and honored around the world. He is a founding member of the VII Photo Agency, dispatches magazine, and the Angkor Photo Festival. He is currently the Tufts' Institute for Global Leadership's Exposure INSPIRE Fellow.


EXP-0064-S:Beyond "Borat": An Introduction to Central Asia
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04360
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 102


Set aside the farcical broadsides presented in the recent film Borat. What do we actually know about the former Soviet states of Muslim Eurasia, a most important part of the world going forward into the 21st century?

This course will survey Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan, and Turkmenistan – with an additional comparative emphasis on Western China, Mongolia, and the Russian Far East. The class will emphasize culture, language, and contemporary politics, but will also address the historical and geographical context of the region. Multimedia such as film and music will be employed, as well as presentations by guest speakers and the occasional sampling of Central Asian cuisine.

This course has been approved by the World Civilizations committee to count toward World Civilizations credit.

Emily Canning spent a number of years studying in Central Asia and conducting fieldwork in southern Kyrgyzstan. She is an advanced doctoral student in Linguistic Anthropology at Brandeis University.


EXP-0066-S:Torture in the Modern World
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04361
Thursday 6-8:30, Eaton 204


There is broad international consensus that torture violates basic human rights norms; moreover, the practice is explicitly banned in several major international treaties and instruments. Why, then, does torture persist in contemporary society, including in liberal democracies?

This course examines the historical uses of torture in order to address its contemporary relevance, as well as the practice of it in democratic societies. Specific attention will be given to the use of torture during the United States' wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the dominant political paradigms for understanding its use, and the limitations of these paradigms. Throughout the course, we will reflect on the complex relationships between how contemporary societies remember legacies of torture and those societies' capacities to address, control, or eliminate the practice.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Jared Del Rosso is currently researching the relationship between torture and American political culture and has taught courses in social theory, social problems, deviance and social control, and torture. at Brandeis University. He is an advanced doctoral student in the Sociology Department at Boston College.


EXP-0074-S:The Supreme Court and Our Common Law System
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04362
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Anderson 210


From guns to gay marriage to terrorism to corporate political donations, we now live in a time when many of our nation's most significant laws, and often the most divisive, are being written by the courts.

In this course, students will become active citizens, exploring how our judicial law-making system works and how it can be improved. They will be introduced to the interactive teaching technique known as Socratic method, while examining the Supreme Court and some of its most important decisions. In preparation for this sessions, students will be required to read and analyze cases like an attorney. They will then be asked to discuss and advocate views with which they may personally disagree, and to think critically about the role of common law in our democratic system of government.

Joseph Palazzo (A '01) is an Assistant District Attorney in the Middlesex County District Attorney's Office.


EXP-0082-S:Marketing and the Drug Industry
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04363
Monday 6:30-9, Eaton 202


Are you inspired by the impact of medical technology on peoples' lives? Do you dream of launching the next big product?

This course gives students a working foundation in marketing and the chance to apply it to one of today's most dynamic industries. Employing such interactive learning tools as case studies, group work, and extended simulations, students will explore the principles of marketing. At the same time they will build strategies and execute marketing communications plans. Finally, the class will analyze how marketing applies to biotechnology and pharmaceuticals.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course counts as a Humanities and Arts elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Rob Roth is a Global Marketing Director for Fabry Disease at Genzyme Corporation, one of the world's leading biotechnology companies. He has fourteen years of experience in health care marketing and communications, as well as leadership experience in roles at Biogen Idec and the public relations firm, BSMG Worldwide.


EXP-0085-S:Changing "Business as Usual": An Introduction to Corporate Social Responsibility
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04364
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Eaton 203


What are the current dilemmas, opportunities, and challenges that corporations and consumers face when trying to make socially and environmentally responsible decisions?

Students in this course will be introduced to how decisions are made within companies and how various stakeholders are engaged and influenced by these decisions. In addition, they will learn about the practical application of social and environmental standards and certifications; the interaction of small social enterprise within the larger corporate context; the disputes within the growing Fair Trade movement; and consumer empowerment and sustainable consumption. Ultimately, students will reflect on the complex roles that business plays in society, as well as the strategies necessary to advance credible corporate citizenship.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course has been approved by the Peace and Justice Studies program to count as an elective, toward either the major or certificate.

Beth Ginsberg Holzman (A '02) is Manager of CSR Strategy and Reporting at The Timberland Company. She is responsible for developing CSR strategy for the $1.3 billion company; engaging internal and external stakeholders in the CSR process; and producing the company's CSR disclosure as a measure of the company's social and environmental footprint.

Anne O'Loughlin (A '02) is the Founder and President of Autonomie Project, a sustainable fashion and footwear company. She is a pioneer in the budding Fair Trade fashion movement, and has led grassroots campaigns locally, nationally and internationally to further the ideals of social entrepreneurship, labor rights, and environmentalism in business and consumerism. She co-owns and formerly served as a chief executive of No Sweat Apparel, a start-up social enterprise. Ms. O'Loughlin also led the development committee that launched the Fair Trade Boston initiative.


EXP-0087-S:Microfinance
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04365
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Miner 225


What if you could give $25 to a business owner in an underdeveloped nation and the impact would be they could feed, educate, and clothe their children for the next 10 months? Would you believe this is possible? In the world of microfinance anything is possible and extraordinary results can be achieved.

In this course, we'll address how these achievements can be made and we'll take a comprehensive look at microfinance and its impact on people and societies. After forming a solid understanding of the various products offered under the microfinance umbrella (i.e., microcredit, microsavings, microinsurance), we'll collaborate to examine opportunities for domestic and international microfinance initiatives. Students will actively participate in the microfinance market by lending to an actual business owner of their choice, analyzing real-time case studies from around the globe and interacting with Boston-area microloan recipients.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course is supported by the Experimental College's Distler Family Endowment, the aim of which is to provide students with courses that bridge the academy and the world of work.

This class has been approved by Entrepreneurial Leadership Studies to count as an elective toward the minor.

Adam Grenier has been a Fellow with Kiva.org, a leading online microfinance lending community whose mission is to connect people through lending for the sake of alleviating poverty. He also worked with Salone Microfinance Trust (SMT) in Sierra Leone, a non-governmental organization that serves the financial needs of over 5,300 economically active poor.


EXP-0091-AS: Inquiry Teaching Group
0.5 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04128
ARR, 96 Packard Avenue


Inquiry is a global-issues simulation for high school students, and forms an integral part of the year's activities for EPIIC. Students in this course will help design and enact a simulation on our nuclear age, to be held during the Spring 2011 semester. In the process, students will mentor a high school delegation and prepare them for this simulation — helping them understand all the materials and issues involved.

Steve Cohen teaches in the Education department at Tufts.

Heather Barry is the Associate Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts.


EXP-0096-S:Auditing for Breadth
0.5-1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04130
ARR


This program is intended to provide students with an opportunity to broaden their education by attending courses in which they might not otherwise enroll. With the approval of the instructors in question, students may elect to audit any three full-credit university courses (or the equivalent) during their four years as an undergraduate. (One course credit is awarded upon completion of the three audits.) Please note: graduating seniors may audit two courses and receive one-half credit.

For more information about this program and an application, contact Robyn Gittleman or Cindy Stewart, at the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Ave, x73384.


EXP-0099-CS: Media Internships
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04131
ARR


Supervised internship in communications and mass media. Student can intern at a newspaper, magazine, book publishing company, film production company, television or radio station, advertising or public relations firm, or other media outlet approved by instructor. Students must intern a minimum of 150 hours during the semester (usually 12-16 hours a week), fulfill written assignments, and meet regularly with the instructor. Registration by consent of instructor. Student should consult with instructor prior to researching and applying for internships, and must submit an Internship Agreement signed by the internship site supervisor prior to being allowed to register.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For more information, contact the instructor, Susan Eisenhauer, at susan.eisenhauer@tufts.edu.

This course will count toward Mass Communications and Media Studies minor credit as a Media Practice elective and toward Film Studies minor credit as a Film Practice elective.

Susan Eisenhauer (J '71) holds a M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Among other responsibilities, she directs the Communications internship program, supervising more than 90 students each year who intern for credit at various media organizations.


EXP-0101-CS: Advanced Filmmaking
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04132
ARR


Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who have completed EXP-0056-S "Making Movies" – or who are able to demonstrate equivalent competence – can continue their training as filmmakers. Students who initially qualify will present a "business plan" for their project and, if accepted, will receive credit, access to TuftsFilmWorks' production and editing equipment, and a supervised context within which to work. In return, they agree to watch a negotiated number of "source" films, keep a "Producer's Log," and write a final assessment, taking into account both the process they went through to produce their film and their reaction to the film once it's done.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For information on eligibility and registration, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x73384.

Advanced Filmmaking is supported by the generosity of Lisa and Bruce Cohen (J86 and A83, respectively).

This course will count toward Mass Communications and Media Studies minor credit as a Media Practice elective and toward Film Studies minor credit as a Film Practice elective.

Howard Woolf is Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks (the ExCollege's filmmaking center) and is currently in post-production on a feature film he wrote and directed called Marranos.


EXP-0102-CS: Advanced Electronic and Digital Media
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04133
ARR, n/a


Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who are able to demonstrate an appropriate degree of competence can continue their training in the multimedia arts.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For information on eligibility and registration, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x73384.

This course will count toward Media Practice credit for the Multimedia Arts minor and for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Howard Woolf is Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks (the ExCollege's filmmaking center), co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.


EXP-0192-PS: Independent Study
0.5-1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04134
ARR


By arrangement only. For more information, come by the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Avenue, or call x73384.


EXP-0192-S:Independent Study
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04135
ARR


By arrangement only. For more information, come by the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Avenue, or call x73384.

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Courses Open Only to Designated Students


EXP-0029-S:Looking at Science Through the Eyes of Other Disciplines
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04120
Wednesday, 7:00-8:15 PM, Metcalf Hall


The main theme of this interdisciplinary seminar for residents of Metcalf will revolve around science and how it impacts other disciplines such as politics and international relations. The press, television, and public policy arenas all seem to show that science is being discussed on all levels of society and that solutions to ongoing problems are being debated. To make this seminar most interesting and relevant, students will have the opportunity to help decide which topics will be discussed and presented. Join us to look at cases that have already happened and the future of science, in general.

Please Note: This course is designed for residents of Metcalf Hall as part of the Bridge Program. Permission of the instructor is required.

Ronnee Yashon holds degrees in Biology, Chemistry, Computer Education, and Law. She has taught human genetics and general biology, as well as bioethics and the law for more than twenty years. She is also the author of a series, Case Studies in Bioethics, and a book entitled, Landmark Legal Cases for Scientists.


EXP-0041-S:Education for Active Citizenship
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04349
Friday, 10:30 AM-1:15 PM, Rabb Room, Lincoln Filene Center


This course is specifically designed to prepare first-year students for Tisch College's Citizenship and Public Service Scholars Program.

In this course students will begin to build a framework for civic engagement. Through selected readings, class discussions, guest speakers, experiential work and simulations, students will learn how change is created in a community-based setting. In order to be effective as college student agents for change, as well as lifelong active citizens, class members will study the relationships between Tufts University and its host communities. Students will become familiar with both the historical and current issues facing these communities, and the ways in which Tufts students and community residents are making a difference.

Please Note: Only students who have been pre-selected for the E4AC program are permitted to enroll.

Elizabeth Bennett has worked as social justice educator and human rights advocate. She holds a Master of Arts in International Law and Diplomacy and a Certificate in International Development (Political and Social Change) from The Fletcher School.


EXP-0090-S:Teaching a Seminar
2.0 credits, Pass/Fail, Call #04126
ARR, 95 Talbot Avenue


This course is designed to assist the undergraduates who are teaching courses in the Experimental College.

Weekly group meetings are held in which student teachers are exposed to a range of teaching techniques and learning theories, asked to articulate their course goals, and given a forum for discussing the unique problems that first-time teachers often encounter.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0090-TS: Teaching Assistant Workshop
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04127
ARR


This course is designed to assist the undergraduates who are teaching assistants for courses in the Experimental College.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0091-S:EPIIC: Our Nuclear Age
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04129
Tuesday and Thursday, 3:00-5:30 PM, Barnum 008


Against the backdrop of the nuclear arc of the history of the race for the atomic bomb and the secrecy and espionage of the Manhattan Project to President Obama's 2010 Nuclear Security Summit and beyond, EPIIC will explore our global nuclear future.

Nine countries control 23,000 nuclear weapons. During the Cold War, world superpowers amassed nuclear arsenals containing the explosive power of one million Hiroshimas. Two decades after the end of the Cold War the U.S. and Russia still have a combined total of more than 20,000 nuclear weapons. The American Academy in Berlin recently asserted that a Hiroshima size weapon detonated from inside the back of a large van in London's Trafalgar Square in the middle of a workday would cause an estimated 115,000 fatalities and another 149,000 injuries from a combination of blasts, fire, and radiation poisoning.

We will look at the history of failed and successful arms control regimes, the threat posed by both declining and rising nuclear states, how nuclear terror and catastrophe are rendered in popular culture, the dilemma of science in the service of military objectives, resource wars in Africa and elsewhere to control and exploit uranium, Israel's Osirak raid and concerns over temptations of preemptive strikes and preventive war, the proclaimed "nuclear renaissance" and the building of new nuclear energy plants, the relevance and ethics of deterrence thinking, and the political, diplomatic, civil and military complexities of proliferation case studies, including Pakistan, South Africa, Libya, Iran, and North Korea.

For more information, click here.

Please Note: This course is a continuation of the EPIIC class from last semester.

Sherman Teichman is Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts, and the founding director of EPIIC (Education for Public Inquiry and International Citizenship). He holds an M.A. from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.


EXP-0194-CS: CMS Senior Project
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04136
ARR


All CMS minors completing their Senior Projects this semester must register for this class.

Julie Dobrow is Director of the Communications and Media Studies and the Media and Public Service programs at Tufts. She holds a Ph.D. in Communications from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania.