Courses

Fall 2011 Courses

Registration for these courses will take place on SIS Online and will begin at 9:00am on the first day of Fall classes, Tuesday, September 6, 2011. Registration will continue for open courses until 5pm on Tuesday, September 20. This page was last updated 9/16/11. Please check back for updates.


Courses Open to All Students


EXP-0003-F: Reading Infinite Jest: David Foster Wallace and the Future of the Novel
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04161
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 116


In the age of the Internet, who writes a thousand-page book? In an era of increasingly shorter and shorter attention spans, who reads it?

Students in this course will both answer and challenge these and a welter of related questions by spending the semester immersed in Wallace's groundbreakng novel. Set in a fictional future at a tennis academy in the Boston suburbs, the world of Infinite Jest seems at once strange and familiar, as it explores the impact that visual and internet technologies have on human identity and community building. And we will alternate between the world of the novel and our own in order to discover how the internet age has fostered new communities of novel readers and how such communities inform our own practices of reading literature. In addition, we will consider the novel within its broader media environment, thinking about how, as readers, they situate themselves in relation to this text, to the online world, and to one another.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Jacqueline O'Dell has taught English 1 and English 2 at Tufts for the past three years. She is a Ph.D. candidate in the Tufts English Department, and her current work focuses on the relationship between critical and popular discourse surrounding what many have called the "post-postmodern" novel, particularly how it has both adapted to and resisted the emerging technologies of social media.


EXP-0005-F: Arthuriana Through the Ages
This course has been cancelled due to low enrollment.


EXP-0015-F: Money and Ethics in the Contemporary Art World
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04163
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Eaton 206


What's behind the glamour of the contemporary art auctions, the collectors, the dealers, and the art fairs? How has the recent rapid rise in prices affected artistic production? What roles do museums play in the contemporary art market? Is the international market in contemporary art sustainable, or should it be?

This course will explore the conflicting business interests found in the international contemporary art market, the role of museums in the market, the recent expansion of international and online opportunities for presenting and marketing artists' work, and the market's effects on the practice of art-making. The course is designed for students interested in the art world, in museum practice, and/or in how practicing contemporary artists function in the markets.

This course has been approved by the Art and Art History Department to count toward Arts Distribution credit.

Laura Knott is on the curatorial staff at the MIT Museum, where she frequently develops exhibitions of contemporary art. She has worked for the past 25 years in the contemporary art world as a practitioner, professor, and curator. Laura holds a Master's degree from the Center for Advanced Visual Studies at MIT.


EXP-0016-F: Nature Encounters Through Art
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04164
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Barnum 208


From fossils to live animals, this course will sharpen students' skills of observation, deepen their knowledge of natural history, and develop their artistic skills in drawing and watercolor. We will learn to draw and paint forms, coloration, and details of natural objects. In addition, we will explore the progress of natural history art – use the same pigments of the Lascaux cave painters and question the scandals of Lewis & Clark's journals and Ernst Haeckel's bogus evolutionary charts. We will then go on to create journal images from microscopic forms collaged with photography, paint with squid ink, or experiment with scarab iridescence. Last but not least, we will finish the semester with a painting session of live animals.

This course has been approved to count as a Studio Art course.

Diane Fiedler
is a watercolor painter, instructor and illustrator with a history in award-winning design for such clients as The Broad Institute of MIT, AstraZeneca, Gillette, WGBH-TV and Fidelity Investments. She holds a degree in Visual & Environmental Studies from Harvard.


EXP-0018-F: Guerrilla Performance Art & Politics
The instructor for this course is no longer able to teach this semester, and the course has been cancelled.


EXP-0019-F: Research for Success: Using the Library for Thesis and Capstone Projects
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04166
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Tisch 223


Are you thinking about writing an honors thesis your senior year? Would you like to get a head start or immediate help understanding the research process? Would you enjoy sharing what you learn as you become an expert in the subject area you are investigating? This course will introduce you to the major research tools and techniques at an intermediate-to-advanced level specific to your subject area. You will also develop a working bibliography of resources, as well as a plan for continuing your research.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

PLEASE NOTE: This is an eight-week course.

Regina Raboin
is the Science Reference Librarian and Reference Microforms/Current Periodicals Coordinator at Tisch Library.

Laurie Sabol is the Social Science Reference Librarian and Coordinator of Library Instruction at Tisch Library.


EXP-0020-F: Architecture and Climate Change: Policy, Power, and Principles
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04207
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 202

How are buildings related to climate change? How has "sustainability" influenced how architects design buildings? And how has the greenhouse gas reduction policy in Massachusetts changed the regulatory climate for architects and real estate developers?

This course takes a close look at the "greening" of architecture. It begins with an overview of current thinking about sustainable design, explores the design process and how scientific and technological challenges are being addressed by the practice, and elaborates on the complex and changing relationship between policy, energy, regulation and construction.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >
View a video introduction to this course >

This course has been approved to count toward Architectural Studies major credit.

Michael Davis
is a licensed architect and a Principal with Bergmeyer Associates, a Boston architectural firm. He is, as well, a LEED-Accredited Professional, a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, and active in both sustainable design and public policy advocacy. He is an Overseer and a Member of the Faculty at the Boston Architectural College, co-chair of the AIA Massachusetts Government Affairs Committee, and acting chair of the Boston Civic Design Commission. He holds a Masters of Architecture from Yale University.


EXP-0022-F: Exploring the Quantitative World through Computation and Geometry
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04208
Monday, 6:30-9:00 PM, East 015 (Room change)


This course is an exploration of what it means to nurture an idea in someone else's head. Concretely, we're going to explore how computation can give us insights into how we think about and communicate mathematical ideas. What does it mean to prove something? Does understanding necessitate prediction? Working with the ideas we explore in topology and differential geometry, participants will develop beautiful, compelling tools or explanations of an idea or theorem in topology or differential geometry. At the end of the course, these explanations (along with our discussions and write-ups about what makes them great) will be printed and bound in a volume showcasing participants' work. We'll do all this using the programming language Ruby and the graphical programming environment Processing. Although some programming experience is helpful, it is not required. If you're interested in design, computation, theoretical mathematics, or education, there's something here for you. No background in computer science or mathematics is assumed.

This course has been approved by Computer Science to count toward the Mathematical Sciences distribution requirement.

Alec Resnick
is the founder of sprout, inc, an educational nonprofit working to make science a cultural activity by opening up community resources and opportunities to engage with data. Sprout also operates a community lab and workshop in Davis Square. Mr. Resnick has been teaching afterschool and community science programs since 2006, while working as a software and electrical engineer in various capacities.


EXP-0026-F: Introduction to Sustainable Food Systems
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04209
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Pearson 112


Modern agriculture is the course of a great majority of our food and is a foundation of the American economy. However, it is an economic system that relies on cheap fuel, low labor costs, and ever-increasing consolidation. In recent years these industrialized inputs and processes have been indicted as a root cause of many of modern society's woes: hunger, obesity, disease, environmental degradation, climate change, economic injustice, and physical and mental estrangement from the land. And yet, alternative systems of agriculture have emerged. Some are the simple revival of "antiquated" practices while others apply agricultural principle to technological innovation. Cities and communities are becoming active players in these new systems, and food is being "slowed down". This course attempts to outline some of these emerging food systems, providing theoretical background and discussion as well as practical, hands-on tools for becoming a part of these new systems.

Jeff Hake is currently the resident farmer at the New Hampshire Farm Museum, where he manages two acres of vegetable production and several animals. He recently received his master's degree from the Agriculture, Food and Environment program of Tufts' Friedman School and continues to work with Mari Pierce-Quinonez to develop the Tufts Community Agriculture Project, which would implement an educational farm on the Medford campus.

Marisol Pierce-Quinonez has a background in urban food systems and currently works in farmers markets around the Boston Area. Mari is a life-long gardener and previously worked for Boston Natural Areas Network on their school gardening campaign, a plant nursery, and on organic farms in Mexico. She recently completed a dual masters degree at Tufts in Agriculture, Food and Environment and Urban and Environmental Policy & Planning.


EXP-0027-F: "When the snow has not frozen": Damage and Resilience in the Arctic
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04210
Thursday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Miner 112


Global Warming. Real or not? Doesn't matter! Something very strange and ominous is actually taking place in the Arctic where climate-induced changes in the Arctic can't be overstated.

This class will begin with an examination of the extreme changes in temperature, sea ice events, sea level rise, and animal species shifts that the Arctic is currently experiencing. We will then consider the circumstances of indigenous Inuit populations who are negotiating changing hunting grounds, novel sea ice conditions, and an altered food-sharing culture – all of which is critical for annual subsistence. Finally, we will turn our attention to complex political and economic arenas as diminishing ice spurs international resource interest in previously inaccessible areas.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course will count toward Track 3 in the Environmental Studies major.

Nathan Stewart
has spent the last five years conducting research in the Arctic on ice-mediated nearshore systems and has participated in two film expeditions on sea ice and the Inupiaq Inuit. He is an advanced Ph.D. candidate in Marine Biology at the School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.


EXP-0028-F: Introduction to Forensic Anthropology
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04211
Monday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Eaton 333


Forensic anthropologists play an essential role in diverse contexts where human skeletal remains are involved. TV shows in popular media such as Bones and CSI depict the contribution forensic anthropologists make in criminal investigations. In addition, forensic anthropologists are often called to the scene of mass disasters such as plane crashes or train wrecks and are increasingly involved in international human rights investigations. This course will explore the role of the forensic anthropologist in these scenarios and discuss the responsibilities and ethic considerations of working with human skeletal remains. In addition, the methodologies used to extract information on the life history of an individual (age, sex, stature, ancestry, pathology, trauma, etc.) will be presented.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course has been approved to count toward Anthropology major credit.

Jennifer Bauder
is currently a member of an international team working on human rights investigations on skeletal remains recovered from a mass grave dating to the Spanish Civil War. Over the past seven years she has assisted with forensic cases gaining experience in search and recovery, processing and analysis of remains and writing reports. She is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Anthropology at Binghamton University, where she specializes in bioarcheology, paleopathology and forensic anthropology. She taught this course previously in the ExCollege in Fall 2007 and Fall 2009.


EXP-0029-F: Friend or Foe: The Psychology and Neuroscience of Perceiving People
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04212
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Miner 225

Whether it be a first date, a job interview, or walking down the street, how -- and why -- does the brain glean information from another's face?

This course will provide an introduction to the psychology and neuroscience of perceiving other people. As such it will explore a basic contradiction. While at first blush, seeing and understanding people can seem so obvious and immediate that they do not require explanation, in fact the kind of computations the brain must make to accomplish them is astounding and complex. We will consider these processes through a multirdisciplinary approach, one that incorporates the work of psychologists, neuroscientists, biologists, and sociologists. We will also look at the social and cultural aspects of facial and bodily recognition, paying particular attention to how we use this information to sort others into categories (gender, race, age, sexual orientation), and infer their emotions, intentions, and personalities.

This course has been approved by the Psychology Department to count toward Natural Sciences distribution credit.

Jonathan Freeman
has published numerous articles on the cognitive and neural basis of person perception. He is a Ph.D. candidate in the Psychology Department at Tufts University.


EXP-0031-F: Sports Obsession: Athletics, Money, and Culture
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04213
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, East 016

In the United States, our apparent obsession with sport takes multiple forms. For example, the expenditures for commercial sports exceed 17.7 billion dollars a years. Sports have their own full section of every major newspaper in the country. Sports fans line sidewalks for hours to secure the chance to watch their cherished teams in person. The list goes on.

This course will attempt to make sense of this phenomenon by examining various dimensions of organized, competitive sports both n the past and the present day. In doing so, we will ask a series of key questions: How does the culture of sport (as both a spectator or consumer, or a player or producer of sport) socially construct men and women as masculine and feminine? How does the media portray professional athletes? How does sport relate to certain social problems such as violence and drug abuse? How does sport relate to the positive socialization and identity formation of physically and mentally healthy athletes?

Brian Fair has published articles on the intersection of religion and health and the diagnostic processes associated with the contested illness known as Morgellons. As a lifelong competitive wrestler, he has also done ethnographic research on high school wrestling, and has a forthcoming publication on wrestlers' constructions of masculinity. He is a Ph.D. candidate and Teaching Fellow in Brandeis University's Department of Sociology, and his dissertation research explores the relationship between sport and community in the neighborhood of South Boston.


EXP-0033-F: The People's Revolution: Reopening the Case of the Minutemen
This course has been cancelled due to low enrollment.


EXP-0034-F: Religion and the New Immigrants in America
This course has been cancelled due to low enrollment.


EXP-0035-AF: Rape Aggression Defense
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04236
Monday, 4:45-6:45 PM, Sophia Gordon Multi-Purpose Room

The Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.) is based on the philosophy of choices: "to develop and enhance the OPTIONS of self defense, so that they become more viable considerations for the woman who is attacked."

While it is completely natural to resist, unless a woman is trained to do so the resistance she attempts may be futile. This course will try to strengthen innate survival techniques by making more options available. Preparation through education and training is usually the best way to survive an assault situation.

Issues that will be addressed include awareness and prevention, sexual assault definitions, patterns of encounter, the decision to resist, basic principles of self-defense, and the defensive mindset. This course will end with realistic simulation training.

Mark Roche and Kerri Dervishian are members of the Tufts University Police Department and certified R.A.D. instructors.


EXP-0035-BF: Rape Aggression Defense
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04237
Tuesday, 5:30-7:30 PM, Sophia Gordon Multi-Purpose Room

The Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.) is based on the philosophy of choices: "to develop and enhance the OPTIONS of self defense, so that they become more viable considerations for the woman who is attacked."

While it is completely natural to resist, unless a woman is trained to do so the resistance she attempts may be futile. This course will try to strengthen innate survival techniques by making more options available. Preparation through education and training is usually the best way to survive an assault situation.

Issues that will be addressed include awareness and prevention, sexual assault definitions, patterns of encounter, the decision to resist, basic principles of self-defense, and the defensive mindset. This course will end with realistic simulation training.

Darren Weisse is a member of the Tufts University Police Department and a certified R.A.D. instructor.


EXP-0036-F: Advanced Rape Aggression Defense
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04149
Thursday, 4:30-6:30 PM, Sophia Gordon Multi-Purpose Room

Advanced Rape Aggression Defense (Advanced RAD) is a continuation of the Basic program and answers a lot of the "what if" questions. The program will begin with a review of the basic program followed by simulation.

This course is more hands on than the basic program and includes topics such as defending against multiple attackers and defense against weapons such as knives and guns. Throughout the course, the instructors will conduct realistic simulation training using impact targets and facilitate discussions on sexual assault, crime prevention and personal protection.

Prerequisite: completion of the basic RAD course

Mark Roche
and Kerri Dervishian are members of the Tufts University Police Department and certified R.A.D. instructors.


EXP-0038-F: The History of "Once Upon a Time": A Close Look at Fairy Tales
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04216
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 110

Where do fairy tales really come from? How have they changed? Why do we keep telling them?

Fairy tales have been part of human culture as long as stories have been told. New versions and retellings are constantly being written and published. In this course, students will look at early versions of selected tales, comparing and contrasting their lives in different cultures. We will then move on to a consideration of how the fairy tale has survived. Finally we will focus on their modern retellings in such genres as the novel, theatre, and film. Our study will be be grounded in an examination of the cultural, social, ideological histories embedded in these texts, as well as the human experience captured in fairy tales, dimensions that touch all parts of our lives.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >
View a video introduction to this course >

Janet Daniels is an English adjunct instructor at Quincy College and a writer of children's literature. While completing her M.F.A. in Writing Literature for Children at Simmons College, she designed an Independent Study in which she analyzed seven fairy tales, charting their evolution from the early documented English literary versions to modern retellings.


EXP-0040-F: Perspectives on Human-Animal Relations
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04217
Thursday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Jackson 05

The field of "animal studies" is a new academic field with many names, definitions, and areas of concentration. Interdisciplinary work in the field of animal studies engages with a wide range of disciplines, from the humanities through the social and "hard" sciences. Some areas of inquiry focus on animals in literature and film, while others look at nonhuman animals through the lenses of feminist and queer theory. A range of other disciplines, from anthropology and history to biology and geography, are all emerging as critical components of the field.

We will be engaging with material from among these - which can be challenging at times, given the specialized jargon often found in various disciplinary texts - but our focus will be on the following question: how does the structure of human-nonhuman animal relationship inform public policies on issues impacting animals? In order to properly answer this question, we will draw heavily on philosophical and other texts that examine the lives and interests of nonhuman animals in their own right.

In a course of this nature, it is disingenuous to feign neutrality when it comes to animal-advocacy based research, as the decisions being debated are precisely those about which animal welfare organizations and other interests group negotiate. Nonetheless, every effort will be made to understand as many perspectives as possible; this is not 'a course about animal rights', and the views in favor of using animals in food production or biomedical research will be presented, as will those opposed and some in between. Students will be expected to be respectful of any opinions presented, even - or especially - if they are very different from your own.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Ike Sharpless is an Adjunct Professor of Political Science at UMass Lowell, where he has introduced a similar course. He is a graduate of both the Fletcher School and the Cummings School's Center for Animals and Public Policy, where he studied environmental policy, international law, and farm animal welfare.


EXP-0047-F: Gender and Culture in Conflict, War, and Peace-Building
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04219
Monday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Terrace Room, Paige Hall

Is our national security influenced by gender equality? To what degree is state security linked to the security of women? Studies have shown that the nations most likely to produce terrorists are those with the most inequity between men and women, but is gender equality the sole causation for this link? What roles do women play in these conflicts and their resolution? Are the power imbalances that lead to conflict at both the macro and the micro level a product of gender inequity?

For students interested in the future of peace and conflict studies, this class will provide an important foundation for understanding the role of sexual difference in the rhetoric, strategy, and resolution of conflicts. In addition to a broad overview of the subject, we will also focus on four specific case studies (the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, South African peace-building, and the current wars in Iraq and Afghanistan). This class examines these questions and concepts from a primarily feminist policy framework, exploring the relationship between gender, conflict, peace, and security, through the lenses of politics, philosophy, economics, psychology, and anthropology.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Jenna DiCocco is a lawyer and the founder and director of The Women's Rights Cooperative. Her principle area of focus is international women's human rights in issues of health and peace-building in Africa and the Middle East. She served as a U.S. Peace Corps volunteer in Zambia, living and working with rural communities on public health and gender issues, and as an AmeriCorps City Year volunteer in Boston. She holds a J.D. from the University of Iowa, with a concentration on international human rights law.


EXP-0048-F: Call to Action: Social Justice through a Jewish Perspective
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #
Monday, 6:00-7:30 PM, Hillel Center

Tired of being all talk and no action? Looking to find a way to make a difference? This course will explore social justice in all its forms, allowing students to both learn about and experience social justice work. Throughout the course, we will discuss the influence of faith-based values of all religions on social justice practices, rooting our journey in Judaism. We will spend the semester investigating the meaning of social justice and the ways in which you can integrate social justice work into everyday life. Students will be expected to participate in a weekly, continuous volunteer experience (minimum of 4 hours a week) throughout the semester at a placement that reflects their personal interests. We will investigate our topics through a multi-faceted lens by looking at traditional and modern texts and hearing from a diverse variety of outside facilitators to create a comprehensive assessment of social justice. Topics include: How to Promote Systemic Change, Spirituality and Activism, and Advocacy and Influencing Policy. This course is open to all students.

Lauren Estes has worked at Tufts Hillel for 11 years and is the current Assistant Director and Repair the World Director of Social Justice Programming. In this role, she supervises many social justice initiatives and large-scale programming. Before working at Hillel, Lauren earned her MSW and worked in foster care and at a rape crisis center.


EXP-0051-F: Introduction to Narrative and Documentary Practice
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04220
Wednesday, 4:00-6:30 PM, 550 Boston Avenue

As we venture into an era where digitally delivered media and 24-hour news cycles bombard us with a deluge of facts, minutiae, perspective, and hyperbole, the role of narrative storytelling is increasingly useful as a means to present information that is immersive, substantive and accessible. Narrative storytelling elaborates beyond the reporting of facts; it can take something specific – an experience, a voice, a place – and use it to illuminate a larger societal issue.

This course serves as a foundation for preparing students, first, to seek out and understand important global, national and local issues and, then, to explain them in a compelling way using visual, written and oral narrative techniques. It will equip students with a broad practical and theoretical understanding of how to tell stories about the world in which we live – doing so through a variety of immersive exercises, technical workshops, class discussions, guest lectures, and group and individual critiques.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Practice elective.

Samuel James is the Program Coordinator for the new Program for Narrative and Documentary Practice, housed in the Tufts University Institute for Global Leadership.


EXP-0052-CF: Public Relations and Marketing: Unraveling the Spin
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04221
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Tisch 316 (Room change)

What is the formula for mind control? Take a little psychology, a pinch of sociology, a smidge of anthropology, some cognitive analysis, and add a healthy dash of strategic media manipulation. Give a good stir. It's all the ingredients you need to decide a Presidential election, repair the reputation of BP after the Gulf oil spill, make more people buy Hondas than Kias, or choose Coke over Pepsi.

Primarily using case studies, this course will look at the history of public relations and marketing in the US and how it evolved in parallel with our media environment. We will explore how the mechanics of this global mega industry create strategies that influence complex world affairs or simply the toothpaste we use.

Guest speakers from the industry will share their thoughts. Students will work in teams on a final project to solve a PR/marketing challenge by creating their own ads, messages and strategic plan.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >
View a video introduction to this course >

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Social Sciences elective.

Gail Bambrick
is Senior Marketing Communications Writer at Tufts. She uses the written word and strategic planning to focus Tufts' identity and messaging in online, print and web communications. She has also been Director of Publications and Associate Director of Communications and Public Relations for the university as well as the News Media and Public Relations Manager for the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. She holds a Ph.D. from Tufts University in American literature.


EXP-0053-CF: Producing Films for Social Change
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04222
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Braker 02

Are you ready for an intensive, hands-on course that allows you to produce your own news documentaries? Do you care about social issues such as poverty, education, the environment, health care, human rights, gender and race? Are you interested in covering community issues and using documentary film to help inform the public? This course will address the powerful role of video journalism as an advocacy tool to shape perceptions of policy and society. Students will learn the principles and techniques of documentary and TV news magazine journalism including directing, camera work, and editing. Special emphasis will be placed on the role of media ethics, First Amendment principles, and current news events. This course will also emphasize citizenship, active community leadership, and creative approaches to civic engagement. Class enrollment will be limited to sixteen students.

This course represents a partnership between the Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service and the Communications and Media Studies program.

It will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Practice elective.

Dacia Kornechuk
has produced two award-winning documentary films and is committed to teaching documentary film and video production as a way for people to have a voice and document the untold stories in our world. She currently is head of the Media Technology department at Cambridge Rindge & Latin School. She holds a M.F.A. from Boston University in Film Production.


EXP-0075-F: Search and Seizure: An Introduction to Fourth Amendment Criminal Procedure
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04223
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Braker 118

This is the class for anyone that has ever gotten that sinking feeling in the pit of their stomach when they see blue lights in their rearview mirror or answers the door at a friend's apartment during a party only to be startled by a couple of scowling police officers. The answers to the question we ask ourselves in those moments – "What do I do!" or "Are they really allowed to do that?" – can be found in examining the opinions of the United States Supreme Court that discuss the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution. By studying these cases, we will explore some of the major rules that govern interactions between law enforcement and citizens in this country. Students will have weekly reading assignments that include reading Supreme Court opinions and supplementary materials and the course will culminate with students using their acquired knowledge in a moderated debate.

Julian Allatt is a practicing attorney who has studied criminal procedure extensively and has worked in the area of criminal defense. He is a graduate of Suffolk University Law School.


EXP-0077-F: The Right to Marry: The Legal Perspective
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04224
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Braker 226

What role does the law play in regulating love? What does it mean when we call marriage a "social institution?"

This class will explore how the law -- whether established through legislation or litigation -- shapes and is shaped by our relationships. We will begin by examining the way that the law has protected the "fundamental right" of marriage and the limitations of those protections. Throughout the course, students will work with both primary source materials legal opinions and commentary on those materials. A secondary focus of this class will be an introduction to the legal system and to tools of legal analysis and argument used throughout law school and legal practice.

Ann Chernicoff is an attorney in the Bankruptcy and Financial Restructuring practice at Nixon Peabody. She is also a recent graduate of Boston University Law School where she was a writing fellow, a peer advisor in the Career Services office, and an Articles Editor for the Public Interest Law Journal.

Ari Kristan is an attorney in the Litigation practice at Ropes and Gray. She is a recent graduate of Boston University Law School where she was president of OutLaw, BU's LGBT organization and interned with both the United States Attorney's Office and the Honorable Patti Saris of the United States District Court, District of Massachusetts.


EXP-0078-F: Health Care Access and the Law
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04225
Thursday 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 218

Why are so many Americans uninsured? Do people who have insurance always get the health care they need? How can the law and advocacy help people navigate the health care system?

This seminar will introduce students to ways in which the law affects access to health care in the United States. The course will use current topics to teach strategies and skills for helping consumers navigate the health care system. The course will address various approaches to challenging access problems, including individual advocacy, regulatory and legislative advocacy, impact litigation and community-based advocacy.

Substantive topics will include managed care, mental health parity, racial disparities, and end-of-life care, among others.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Clare McGorrian is an attorney in private practice, representing individuals in health and disability insurance matters. She graduated from Northeastern University School of Law and Harvard College and has taught health law at Boston area law schools.


EXP-0084-F: The Business of Sports: A Study of the NBA
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04226
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Anderson 211

Professional sports has evolved from the "mom and pop" environment of 30 years ago, to that of a sophisticated, high risk, high profile, "big business." Current events in pro sports are documented in virtually every major newspaper and periodical in the country. In our daily lives it's hard to avoid exposure to sports in some form or another, yet many off-field issues are confusing to the casual (and maybe not so casual) fan. This course is intended to make sense out of the confusion by providing an overview of the pro sports industry as a business. Subjects for inquiry will include the development of the National Basketball Association from the late 1960s through the present. Assigned readings will be principally from original N.B.A. operational documents, and will provide a fundamental understanding of the concepts, theories, and terms related to general sports business/legal issues, and the N.B.A. in particular.

Jan Volk currently serves as a consultant to a number of N.B.A. teams. After earning a J.D. from Columbia in 1971, he went to work for the Boston Celtics and, in 1984, was named General Manager, a position he held until May 1997. As GM, he was responsible for the acquisition, contractual negotiation, renegotiation, and ultimate signing of all Celtics players.


EXP-0091-AF: Inquiry Teaching Group
0.5 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03978
ARR, 96 Packard Avenue

Inquiry is a global-issues simulation for high school students, and forms an integral part of the year's activities for EPIIC. Students in this course will help design and enact a simulation on Confronting Conflict in the 21st Century, to be held during the Spring 2012 semester. In the process, students will mentor a high school delegation and prepare them for this simulation — helping them understand all the materials and issues involved.

Steve Cohen teaches in the Education department at Tufts.

Heather Barry is the Associate Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts.


EXP-0091-F: EPIIC: Confronting Conflict in the 21st Century
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03525
Tuesday and Thursday, 3:00-5:30 PM, Barnum 08

More than 1.5 billion people currently live in countries directly affected by conflict, with millions more feeling the indirect consequences.  While inter-state and intra-state violence have seen recent declines, violence is still on the rise, compromising peace, security and development.  The 2011-12 EPIIC colloquium will explore the complexity and challenges of international, national, and local conflict in this century.

Some of the questions we will address include:  What are, and will be, the primary causes of conflict in the 21st century?  What governance issues do states and the international community need to take into consideration in redressing conflict situations, including the persistence of secular nationalism, communalism and national self-determination?  Are there effective strategies to construct pluralistic societies?  In what ways will the global war on terrorism need to be reconsidered as the war in Afghanistan enters its tenth year and the war in Iraq enters its eighth year?  How can states and the international community address violence and lawlessness associated with local disputes, political repression and organized crime in fragile and failed states?  What impact do the internet and other social media have in mediating the balance between power and powerlessness?  How can states redress ongoing resources conflicts, from the DR Congo to Nigeria to Iraq?  What are the environmental stresses that can lead to or exacerbate conflict, from food insecurity to the impact of climate change to migration to the depletion of resources?  What is the relationship between poverty, inequality and conflict? Between public health and conflict?

We will examine persistent, seemingly intractable confrontations from Israel and Palestine to Kashmir to the Korean peninsula, looking for avenues to durable solutions.  We will consider the ways in which state failure and internal conflict present international security threats, analyzing the potential role of external actors in preventing and resolving such crises.  The colloquium will also explore the effectiveness of current post-conflict resolution and reconstruction strategies and study ways to mitigate and prevent conflict.  What are the avenues for building, and rebuilding, civil society?  Current events in Libya and the Cote d'Ivoire have focused attention on the international community's commitment to the "Responsibility To Protect" and the roles of military and humanitarian intervention.  When and how should states intervene? 

The course will also explore the future forms of conflict and the changing battlefield, from contending with non-state actors to cyber warfare, from armed humanitarians to robotic warfare.  How will future wars be fought and resolved?

This is a High Demand course. You MUST attend the first class meeting for a chance to enroll in the course.

Sherman Teichman
is Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts, and the founding director of EPIIC (Education for Public Inquiry and International Citizenship). He holds an M.A. from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.


EXP-0096-F: Auditing for Breadth
0.5-1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03979

This program is intended to provide students with an opportunity to broaden their education by attending courses in which they might not otherwise enroll. With the approval of the instructors in question, students may elect to audit any three full-credit university courses (or the equivalent) during their four years as an undergraduate. (One course credit is awarded upon completion of the three audits.) Please note: graduating seniors may audit two courses and receive one-half credit.

For more information about this program and an application, contact Cindy Stewart, at the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Ave, x73384.

Cindy Stewart is the Assistant Director of the Experimental College.


EXP-0099-CF: Media Internships
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03980

Supervised internship in communications and mass media. Student can intern at a newspaper, magazine, book publishing company, film production company, television or radio station, advertising or public relations firm, or other media outlet approved by instructor. Students must intern a minimum of 150 hours during the semester (usually 12-16 hours a week), fulfill written assignments, and meet regularly with the instructor. Registration by consent of instructor. Student should consult with instructor prior to researching and applying for internships, and must submit an Internship Agreement signed by the internship site supervisor prior to being allowed to register.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For more information, contact contact the instructor, Susan Eisenhauer, at susan.eisenhauer@tufts.edu.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Practice elective.

Susan Eisenhauer
(J '71) holds a M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Among other responsibilities, she directs the Communications internship program, supervising more than 90 students each year who intern for credit at various media organizations.


EXP-0101-CF: Advanced Filmmaking
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03981

Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who have completed EXP-0056-CS: Making Movies – or who are able to demonstrate equivalent competence – can continue their training as filmmakers. Students who initially qualify will present a business plan for their project and, if accepted, will receive credit, access to TuftsFilmWorks' production and editing equipment, and a supervised context within which to work. In return, they agree to watch a negotiated number of source films, keep a Producer's Log, and write a final assessment, taking into account both the process they went through to produce their film and their reaction to the film once it is done.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For information on eligibility and registration, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x73384.

Advanced Filmmaking is supported by the generosity of Lisa and Bruce Cohen ('J86 and 'A83, respectively).

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Practice elective.

Howard Woolf
is Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks (the ExCollege's filmmaking center), co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.


EXP-0102-CF: Advanced Electronic and Digital Media
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03982

Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who are able to demonstrate an appropriate degree of competence can continue their training in the multimedia arts.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For information on eligibility and registration, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x73384.

This course will count toward Media Practice credit for the Multimedia Arts minor and for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Howard Woolf
is Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks (the ExCollege's filmmaking center), co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.


EXP-0192-F: Independent Study
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03985

By arrangement only. For more information, come by the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Avenue, or call x73384.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0192-PF: Independent Study
0.5-1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03986

By arrangement only. For more information, come by the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Avenue, or call x73384.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.

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Courses Open Only to Designated Students


EXP-0007-F: Writing Fellowship Seminar
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03971
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Braker 113

This course has been the required training for all new undergraduate Writing Fellows since 1999. Most universities of a comparable size and caliber of Tufts require a training course for peer writing tutors, but this ExCollege course is unique in that new tutors take the course during their first semester as tutors. After an initial orientation held before the semester begins, the course provides a theoretical framework, practical skills, and a support group for new tutors while they are learning how to become good tutors. The purpose of holding the class during instead of or before the first semester of tutoring is to reinforce the importance of self-reflection as a necessary part of any teaching practice, especially peer tutoring. The class, then, becomes a community of writers: peers supporting peers as writers and novice writing tutors. Hence, the title of "writing fellow" emphasizes the "fellowship" that is an essential and unique aspect of Tufts' Writing Fellows Program.

NOTE: This is a mandatory course for Writing Fellows and Writing Tutors and enrollment is limited to these groups.

Kristina Aikens
is an Assistant Director for Writing Resources at the Tufts University Academic Resource Center. She holds a Ph.D. in English from Tufts.


EXP-0010-F: Moving From Diversity to Social Justice
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03972
Tuesday and Thursday, 4:30-5:45 PM, Terrace Room

We want a college with "diversity," but what does that mean? Once we find ourselves members of this "diverse" community, then what? This discussion course explores topics of diversity in the US from a social justice lens. When students of color sit together in the dining hall, why do we think they are "segregating" themselves? (Do we think the same of a group of white students?) Why are only queer students, and not straight students, expected to "come out"? And what defines our socio-economic class? We focus on social justice topics (i.e. social identities, power, privilege, oppression) and relate them to our experiences growing up in the US. We see how the work of Tufts' Group of Six (Africana, Asian American, International, Latino, Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender, and Women's Centers) is inclusive and relevant to the lives of all Tufts students. We'll have opportunities for self-exploration and learning through readings, films, discussions, and interactive exercises. Is this for you? Definitely, if your mind opens onto a willingness to learn and be personally challenged in a supportive atmosphere.

NOTE: This is a first year advising seminar and enrollment is only open to those new students assigned to this section.

Linell Yugawa
is the Director of the Asian American Center and on the Dean of Student Affairs staff at Tufts University. She has an M.Ed. and M.S.W. and a strong interest in social justice education which she incorporates in her work with student peer leadership training and in this course, which she had taught since the Fall of 2002.


EXP-0011-F: Class Matters
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03973
Tuesday and Thursday, 4:30-5:45 PM, Latino Center

How do we define class in the United States? What is the relationship between socio-economic class and race and ethnicity? Do we live in a meritocracy? Do we all have an equal chance of achieving the American Dream? What does the current economic crisis reveal about class in the US? These and other questions will be the focus of this full credit, pass/fail advising course.

NOTE: This is a first year advising seminar and enrollment is only open to those new students assigned to this section.

Ruben Salinas Stern
is the Director of the Latino Center at Tufts University and has taught this course since the Fall of 2002.


EXP-0090-AF: Teaching an Explorations Seminar
1.5 credits, Pass/Fail, Call #03975
Monday, 12:00-12:50PM; Thursday, 9:30-10:20AM, 95 Talbot Avenue

This course is designed to facilitate undergraduate team-teaching for those leading first-semester seminars for incoming freshmen. Weekly group meetings will be held, in which student teachers will be exposed to a range of teaching techniques and theories, asked to articulate their course goals, and given a forum for discussing the unique problems that new teachers often encounter. Students will be required to keep journals, and reflect upon the concerns and questions that arise over the course of the semester.

Please Note: This is a mandatory course for students leading Explorations seminars, and enrollment is limited to these student-teachers.

Robyn Gittleman
is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0090-BF: Teaching a Perspectives Seminar
1.5 credits, Pass/Fail, Call #03976
Monday, 12:00-1:15 PM, Braker 223

Similar to the Explorations Seminar, this course supports students teaching a Perspectives course, all of whom will work under the umbrella topic of movies as both art and industry.

Please Note: This is a mandatory course for students leading Perspectives seminars, and enrollment is limited to these student-teachers.

Howard Woolf
, Associate Director of the Experimental College, and Cindy Stewart, Assistant Director of the Experimental College, coordinate the Perspectives program.


EXP-0090-TF: Teaching Assistant Workshop
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03977
ARR,

This course is designed to assist the undergraduates who are teaching assistants for courses in the Experimental College.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0190-BF: CMS Senior Colloquium
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03983
Wednesday, 12:00-12:50 PM, Miner 112 (Room change)

All C.M.S. seniors thinking about completing a Senior Project must register for one of the two sections of the C.M.S. Senior Colloquium. The colloquium aims to help seniors develop their ideas, provides them with a forum for sharing resources and work strategies, and trains them in the scheduling and time management procedures necessary for successful completion of projects.

Please note: Registration for this course will be done in person with CMS Director Julie Dobrow. Come to her office at 95 Talbot Ave on Tuesday, Sept. 6, between 9:00 am and 2:00 pm.

Leslie Goldberg
(J '84), the instructor for section BF, is the founder of Blue Sun Communications, a corporate communications consulting firm. Among her clients are the Tufts University College of Engineering. She holds a M.S. in Mass Communication from Boston University.


EXP-0190-CF: CMS Senior Colloquium
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03984
Thursday, 9:30-10:20 AM, Anderson 208

All C.M.S. seniors thinking about completing a Senior Project must register for one of the two sections of the C.M.S. Senior Colloquium. The colloquium aims to help seniors develop their ideas, provides them with a forum for sharing resources and work strategies, and trains them in the scheduling and time management procedures necessary for successful completion of projects.

Please note: Registration for this course will be done in person with CMS Director Julie Dobrow. Come to her office at 95 Talbot Ave on Tuesday, Sept. 6, between 9:00 am and 2:00 pm.

Julie Dobrow
is Director of the Communications and Media Studies and the Media and Public Service programs at Tufts. She holds a PhD in Communications from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania.