Courses

Fall 2010 Courses

Registration for these courses will begin at 9:00am on the first day of Fall classes, Tuesday, September 7, 2010. Please check back for updates. This page was last updated 8/24/10.


Courses Open to All Students


EXP-0004-F: Religion and the Graphic Novel
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03966
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Anderson 313


Is Superman based more on Moses or on Jesus? Can reading a comic book be a religious ritual? This course will consider the influence of religion outside of the churches, synagogues, temples, and mosques – particularly in popular culture, and especially in comic books and graphic novels. We will explore such questions as why the divide between religious and secular society is as messy and enmeshed as the space between words and images in a comic and, why, according to several cultural scholars, Americans have a surprisingly limited "religious literacy" in even detecting references, allusions, and inspirations from faith in popular culture and art. Our work will be grounded in several award-winning graphic novels the study of which will enhance students' sensitivity and skills to deepen their third-party appreciation of both religion's and the medium's active engagement.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Humanities and the Arts elective.

A. David Lewis, an accomplished graphic novelist, university lecturer, and comics studies researcher, is the co-editor of the collection, Graven Images: Religion in Comic Books & Graphic Novels. In addition to serving as an Editorial Board member for the International Journal of Comic Art, he is the author of two graphic novels, the award-winning Lone and Level Sands and Some New Kind of Slaughter.


EXP-0005-F: Northern Ireland on Screen and Stage: Representations of Violence, Politics, and Religion
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03967
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Anderson 306


This course will explore how filmmakers and playwrights have depicted the physical, emotional, and psychological violence that has characterized the period of "the troubles" in Northern Ireland: a period of sectarian violence (roughly 1969-1998) which has caused the deaths of more than 3,500 people and the serious injury of more than 37,000. In particular, we will consider the following questions: How has the violence in Northern Ireland affected familial relationships, national identity, issues of masculinity/femininity? How has poverty exacerbated tensions in the North and perpetuated the cycle of violence? How have Northern filmmakers and playwrights chosen to represent the violence of the Troubles (through humor, explicit physical bloodshed, or more subtle psychological analysis)? What solution or path (if any) do they suggest toward healing and reconciliation? A few of the films we will be analyzing in this course include: Bloody Sunday (Paul Greengrass), In the Name of the Father (Jim Sheridan), and The Boxer (Jim Sheridan) as well as plays from Brian Friel, Gary Mitchell, Marie Jones, Martin McDonagh, among others.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This class has been approved by the Department of Drama and Dance to count toward the Arts distribution requirement. It will also count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Humanities and the Arts elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Criticism elective.

Fiona Coffey spent a number of years working as an agent in the entertainment industry in New York representing playwrights, directors, politicians, and celebrities. She is currently a PhD candidate in Theatre History at Tufts University, and she holds a Masters degree in Irish Theatre and Film from Trinity College, Dublin Ireland.


EXP-0006-F: Vampires in Civilization
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03968
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Braker 223


The media hailed 2009 as the "year of the vampire," but stories of vampires and vampiric creatures have existed since the dawn of civilization. How can the human obsession with vampires be explained? This course will examine the vampire from its earliest antecedents in the Bronze Age, to Gothic literature, to Victorian occultism, to contemporary pop culture and the modern phenomenon of self-identified "vampires." The undead will be explored using an interdisciplinary "tool kit" that includes the perspectives of anthropology, psychology, comparative literature, religious studies, and even criminology.

This class has been approved by the History Department to count toward the Humanities distribution requirement.

Joseph Laycock is the author of Vampires Today: The Truth About Modern Vampirism as well as several scholarly works on the undead. He has appeared on NPR, Geraldo at Large, and The History Channel Canada to comment on our culture's current obsession with vampires. He holds a Masters of Theological Studies from Harvard Divinity School and is currently a doctoral candidate at Boston University.


EXP-0012-F: Discovering Indian Music
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03969
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Miner 112


Greater Boston is rich with many varieties of Indian music and dance. In this course, students will learn about and sample from this abundance, culminating with group fieldwork projects that focus on a specific Indian music or dance practice found in the Boston area. Students will also acquire the ability to listen to, analyze, and identify the broad characteristics of the major genres of Indian music. Hands-on opportunities with the instructor and with guest presenters will be a significant feature of this course.

This class has been approved by the Music Department to count toward the Arts distribution requirement.

Harriotte Hurie, PhD, is a Hindustani vocalist/teacher and Hindi speaker who has taught and performed Hindustani music for three decades, based on seven years of study and research in Varanasi, India. She has designed and taught undergraduate-level introductions to Indian musics and their cultural contexts at the New England Conservatory and at Wesleyan University.


EXP-0014-F: Becoming a Singer/Songwriter: The Art of the Ballad
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03970
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Granoff 271


Where can you meet Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Johnny Cash, Bruce Springsteen, and Dolly Parton? Where can you learn to write your own ballad? This course centers on the music of the heart and personal expression. We will study the form and history of the American ballad, its English roots, and basic music theory in order to compose ballads inspired by our own lives. We will write a childhood ballad, an adolescent ballad, and the adult ballad focusing on moments of joy, pain, anger, rage, frustration, fear, desire, and love. The class will give a performance of their ballads at the end of the semester.

Terry Michael Chance toured with Conway Twitty for nineteen years as his rhythm guitar player and backup vocalist. He holds a doctorate in Fine Arts from Texas Tech University and has taught at both the University of Massachusetts at Lowell and Lesley University, where he is the Paul A. Kaplan Visiting Artist for the Oxford Street Players.


EXP-0019-F: Research for Success: Using the Library for Thesis and Capstone Projects
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03972
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Tisch 223


Are you thinking about writing an honors thesis your senior year? Would you like to get a head start or immediate help understanding the research process? Would you enjoy sharing what you learn as you become an expert in the subject area you are investigating? This course will introduce students to the major research tools and techniques at an intermediate-to-advanced level specific to their subject area. Each student will also develop a working bibliography of resources, as well as a plan for continuing his/her research.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

PLEASE NOTE: This is an eight-week course.

Regina Raboin is the Science Reference Librarian and Reference Microforms/Current Periodicals Coordinator at Tisch Library.

Laurie Sabol is the Coordinator of Library Instruction at Tisch Library.


EXP-0020-F: Designing Sustainable Products
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03973
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Eaton 333


Did you know that 70% of the environmental impact of a product is determined during the product design state? Did you know that the world economy annually produces more than $60 trillion of such products and services as automobiles, water bottles, computers, iPods, and shoes? This course will consider the environmental impacts of products, as well as the design strategies necessary to mitigate these impacts. It will explore the tremendous global burden of current manufacturing processes including depletion of natural resources, pollution, climate change, ozone depletion, and adverse impacts on human and environmental health. And it will provide an introduction to designing more sustainable products which includes concepts such as lifecycle thinking, eco-design, material selection, inherent product safety, recycling, reuse, product take back, green chemistry, and design for the environment.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course will count toward the Environmental Studies major, Track II: Environment and Technology.

Gregory Morose works at the University of Massachusetts Lowell as adjunct faculty for the School of Health and Environment, and also as the Industry Research Project Manager for the Toxics Use Reduction Institute. For the past five years, Gregory has been the project manager for the New England Lead-free Electronics Consortium. Gregory has a bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering, master's degrees in business administration and environmental studies, and a doctoral degree in cleaner production and nanotechnology.


EXP-0022-F: Exploring the Quantitative World
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03974
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 202


This course is an exploration of what it means to nurture an idea in someone else's head. Concretely, we're going to explore how computation can give us insights into how we think about and communicate mathematical ideas. What does it mean to prove something? Does understanding necessitate prediction? Working with the ideas we explore in topology and differential geometry, participants will develop beautiful, compelling tools or explanations of an idea or theorem in topology or differential geometry. At the end of the course, these explanations (along with our discussions and write-ups about what makes them great) will be printed and bound in a volume showcasing participants' work. We'll do all this using the programming language Ruby and the graphical programming environment Processing. Although some programming experience is helpful, it is not required. If you're interested in design, computation, theoretical mathematics, or education, there's something here for you. No background in computer science or mathematics is assumed.

This course has been approved by Computer Science to count toward the Mathematical Sciences distribution requirement.

Alec Resnick is the founder of sprout, inc, an educational nonprofit working to make science a cultural activity by opening up community resources and opportunities to engage with data. Sprout also operates a community lab and workshop in Davis Square. Mr. Resnick has been teaching afterschool and community science programs since 2006, while working as a software and electrical engineer in various capacities.


EXP-0026-F: Emerging Alternatives in Modern Agriculture
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03975
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Anderson 210


This course is an exploration of emerging agricultural systems. It will begin with a consideration of the role that agriculture plays in our society and how it has been traditionally structured, relying on cheap fuel, low labor costs, and ever-increasing consolidation. We will also look at the current critique of traditional agriculture as a series of industrialized inputs and processes that are a root cause of many of modern society's woes: hunger, obesity, disease, environmental degradation, climate change, economic injustice, and physical and mental estrangement from the land. In addition, students will look at practical, hands-on tools for becoming a part of new, alternative systems of agriculture, ones as simple as the revival of "antiquated" practices and others involving technological innovations. And along similar lines, we will research how cities and communities are becoming active players in these new systems, and food is being "slowed down."

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course will count toward the Environmental Studies major, Track III: Environment and Society.

Jeffrey Hake has taught gardening classes for elementary and middle school classes, worked as a community organizer for workers' rights, and has been a gardener since he was twelve. He works part-time for the New Entry Sustainable Farming Project writing Plain Language Guides, and interned with New Entry this summer, creating and implementing farmer training programs related to composting and crop rotation. He is a first-year graduate student pursuing a degree in Agriculture, Food and Environment at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Marisol Pierce-Quinonez works part-time for Boston Natural Areas Network on their school gardening campaign and previously worked at a plant nursery and spent several months working on organic farms in Mexico. She is also a lifelong vegetable gardener. She is a third-year graduate student pursuing a dual degree in Agriculture, Food and Environment from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy, and Urban and Environmental Policy & Planning from Tufts University Graduate School of Arts & Sciences.


EXP-0028-F: Forensic Psychology
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03976
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 206

If you've wondered how psychology can be applied to dead people, or you want to be the next Dr. Huang from Law & Order: SVU, or you've wondered how people can kill without being mentally ill, this course begins to answer those questions. In studying an overview of topics related to forensic psychology, we will learn how the science of psychology - research, theory, and practice - can be applied to legal issues. We will review the basics of the legal system as it relates to forensic mental health, followed by a quick review of the most relevant mental health issues. We will grapple with controversial issues such as individual responsibility in the face of criminal behavior. We will enter the arena of terrorism studies where there are more questions than answers. Finally, we will look ahead to our futures and explore what career options exist in this most intriguing field.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

Tali Walters has been a practitioner of forensic mental health for over fifteen years. She conducts forensic psychological evaluations for defense and prosecuting attorneys, consults extensively around violence risk, testifies in federal, superior, and district Courts, and organizes international conferences on terrorism. Dr. Walters serves as vice-president to the Governing Board of the Society for Terrorism Research and is Associate Editor for its peer reviewed journal. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Tufts University School of Medicine.


EXP-0030-F: Planned Cities: Power, Ideology, and Identity
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03977
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Robinson 153


This course examines the origins and design of planned cities from around the world spanning thousands of years – from the earliest examples of urban planning in the Indus Valley, to cities currently under construction in Africa, the Middle East, and China. A variety of themes will be explored including the "Garden City Movement," colonial and postcolonial cities, totalitarianism and the city, utopianism, "green" cities, and "creative" cities. We will examine the various motivations underlying the design and construction of planned cities and how they are shaped by power, religion, and political ideologies. This course will also investigate the evolving concepts used in city design as well as the continuities in city features such as the grid and the axis that span centuries and even millennia. Students interested in cities, architecture and planning in different cultural contexts will enjoy this course.

This class has been approved by the Architectural Studies Program to count as a Social Science/Humanities elective.

Sarah Moser is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Comparative Urban Studies at the Center for Urban and Global Studies at Trinity College. In 2008-2009, Sarah was a postdoctoral fellow in the Architecture Department at MIT and holds a PhD in Cultural Geography. Sarah has lived in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore and is interested in the process of nation-building in Southeast Asia and the Muslim world and in master planned cities. She is currently finishing a book called New Cities in the Muslim World.


EXP-0035-F: Rape Aggression Defense
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03787
Wednesday, 4:00-6:00 PM, Sophia Gordon Multipurpose Room


The Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.) is based on the philosophy of choices: "to develop and enhance the OPTIONS of self defense, so that they become more viable considerations for the woman who is attacked." While it is completely natural to resist, unless a woman is trained to do so the resistance she attempts may be futile. This course will try to strengthen innate survival techniques by making more options available. Preparation through education and training is usually the best way to survive an assault situation. Issues that will be addressed include awareness and prevention, sexual assault definitions, patterns of encounter, the decision to resist, basic principles of self-defense, and the defensive mindset. This course will end with realistic simulation training.

Mark Roche and Kerrie Dervishian are members of the Tufts Police Department and certified R.A.D. instructors.


EXP-0037-F: The Gay and Lesbian Movements: Liberation or Assimilation?
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03979
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Olin 006


Will GLBT people ever be able to finally achieve genuine equality with the rest of America? Using sources from a variety of disciplines, this inter-disciplinary course will explore the historical struggles that challenged, shaped, defined and ultimately determined the direction the gay and lesbian social movement would take and the current consequences of those actions.

We will look at how, throughout its relatively short history, the gay and lesbian movement has shifted between the assimilationist or liberationist strategies. And we will pay special attention to how this ideological struggle has been a source of bitter resentment and has led to controversial stances such as "virtual equality."

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This class has been approved by the History Department to count toward the Humanities distribution requirement.

Bert Ouellette is a counselor and adjunct professor of Psychology at Emmanuel College. He completed his pastoral care residency at St. Vincent's Hospital in New York. He wrote his doctoral dissertation on the life span of social movements, using the gay and lesbian movement as a case study. Mr. Ouellette holds two Master's degrees from Boston College (one in comparative literature and the other in Developmental Psychology), and a PhD in Law, Policy and Society from Northeastern University.


EXP-0044-F: Climate Change: A Crisis in Communication
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03980
ONLINE


Put aside the consequences of global warming for a moment. What can the climate change controversy teach us about our relation to knowledge and how we justify our beliefs? What do new media experiments in climate communication, government transparency, and activism imply for learning, scientific literacy, and the future of information? What's at stake? In this online course, we will explore these and other related questions and contribute to new media experiments in the synthesis of information. The course's center of gravity is our dedicated blog, where we share our work and bring back experiences from the global community.  View the course blog >

Please Note: This course is being taught online.

This course will count toward the Environmental Studies major, Track III: Environment and Society and toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Social Sciences elective.


Paulina Essunger is a science editor and translator, specializing in critical review of climate and energy-related research. She grew up in Goteborg, Sweden, and holds a Master of Science in engineering physics from Chalmers Tekniska Hogskola. As a working scientist she conducted HIV research with AIDS pioneers David Ho and Alan Perelson. She holds two MAs in philosophy, one from Tufts and one from Harvard. In 2004, she taught "Animals: Ethics, Law and Activism" in the Experimental College.


EXP-0046-F: Environmental Action: Shifting from Saying to Doing
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03981
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Anderson 313


This class is designed for students who want a refreshing way to examine the truths behind the environmental concerns in the news. Through the lens of psychology, social marketing and critical thinking, we will examine the current environmental issues impacting our world. As you learn more about our environmental challenges you will gain tools to examine your and your peers' personal behavior and learn how to create behavior change. This course aims to empower you to find your voice and become a leader for environmental action. You will learn practical skills in communication, social marketing campaigns, and event planning. Activities during the semester will include: critical thinking research examining current environmental issues; personal challenges; campus social marketing group projects. By the end of the semester you will leave this class with a new perspective on yourselves, society and the environment.

More information and a PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course will count toward the Environmental Studies major, Track III: Environment and Society.

Tina Woolston joined the Tufts University Office of Sustainability in September of 2007. She holds a M.S. in Animal Science and Ruminant Nutrition from Cornell University. At Tufts she has worked on greening initiatives with the purchasing, publications, and dining departments. In addition, during Fall 2008, she started the Eco-Ambassador program for staff. Tina also has worked as the Program Manager for Sustainability at Earthwatch Institute, conducting emissions audits and office-greening initiatives.

Negin Toosi
is a doctoral candidate in the Tufts Psychology Department, and her current research focuses on factors that impact cognition, attitudes, and behavior in social interactions.


EXP-0050-CF: Media Literacy
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03788
Monday, 1:30-4:00 PM, Rabb Room, Lincoln Filene Center


In a media-saturated world, endless possibilities exist for what we can watch, read, listen to, and create. Yet all too often, the flood of images overwhelms us, paralyzes us, and shapes our perceptions of ourselves, others and the world. This class will focus on how we can deconstruct these images in order to use the media for positive social change, and avoid being used by it. We will examine media stereotypes of gender, ethnicity, race, and class, explore the role of the "citizen journalist," discuss the ways new media has changed the traditional media landscape, and think about the impact of media convergence and the ethical issues that arise when only a few corporations own the majority of news, entertainment, publishing, and internet outlets. Finally, by examining scholarly research, film clips, TV news and hearing guest speakers, we will focus on the importance of media literacy in our everyday lives, and how to use the media to become an active citizen.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Social Sciences elective.

Julie Dobrow is Director of Communications and Media Studies and the Media and Public Service program at Tufts. She holds a Ph.D. in Communications from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania.


EXP-0053-CF: Producing Films for Social Change
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03982
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Braker 02


Are you ready for an intensive, hands-on course that allows you to produce your own news documentaries? Do you care about social issues such as poverty, education, the environment, health care, human rights, gender and race? Are you interested in covering community issues and using documentary film to help inform the public? This course will address the powerful role of video journalism as an advocacy tool to shape perceptions of policy and society. Students will learn the principles and techniques of documentary and TV news magazine journalism including directing, camera work, and editing. Special emphasis will be placed on the role of media ethics, First Amendment principles, and current news events. This course will also emphasize citizenship, active community leadership, and creative approaches to civic engagement. Class enrollment will be limited to sixteen students.

This course represents a partnership between the Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service and the Communications and Media Studies program.

It will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Practice elective.


Dacia Kornechuk has produced two award-winning documentary films and is committed to teaching documentary film and video production as a way for people to have a voice and document the untold stories in our world. She currently is head of the Media Technology department at Cambridge Rindge & Latin School. She holds a M.F.A. from Boston University in Film Production.


EXP-0054-F: Whose Pictures are These? Exploring the Ethics of Participatory Photography
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03983
Thursday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Anderson 210


What ethical considerations are involved in collaborative and/or participatory media, art, or educational projects? When does empowerment become exploitation? This is a course designed for students with interest in the arts, photography, and/or education, who are interested in exploring participatory or collaborative approaches to their work with others. We will identify the origins of participatory photography – the practice of putting cameras in the hands of individuals who have historically been the subjects of other people's photographs – within the fields of documentary film and photography, visual anthropology, and empowerment education, and establish a critical framework for looking at participatory photography alongside other contemporary collaborative art and educational projects. In-depth examinations of specific projects and programs will highlight questions such as: Who gets chosen for inclusion in participatory photography programs and why? Who benefits - personally, professionally, and financially - from participatory collaborations? And what are the ethical dimensions of producing something (for example a book, or an exhibition, or a movie) out of the students' work?

This class has been approved by the Department of Art and Art History to count toward the Arts distribution requirement.

Emily Belz is a photographer and art educator who has worked with and facilitated participatory photography projects in Thailand and the United States. She holds an MA in art and design education from the Rhode Island School of Design and is currently a Museum Educator with Historic New England.


EXP-0055-F: Using Web Design to Tell Your Story
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03984
Tuesday, 7:00-9:30 PM, Halligan 105


Do you have a story to tell the world? Ideas to share with and inspire others? In this course, using dynamic visual design, non-linear structure and thoughtful organization, you will create a unique, interactive project of your choosing for publication on the World Wide Web. In this course students will create a web project that explores an area of interest, telling a story about this subject. Some examples could be: personal story or interest, a site about a project or body of art or other personal work; a topic based on a research paper written for another course, or senior thesis project ideas; creative project inspired by a story, work of art, building, film, piece of music. Once the subject is determined, it will be developed into a web project using the following steps: defining a mission, defining an audience, creating a concept map to help visualize the site structure and content, developing ideas for visual design, writing a project proposal, which serves as a blueprint for the site, creating site content -- writing, images, graphics, interactive elements – building the site, testing and publishing the site. Tools we will use include the following software:  VUE, Photoshop, Dreamweaver, Flash.

This course has been approved by the Department of Art and Art History to count toward the Arts distribution requirement. It will also count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Media Practice elective.

Christine Cavalier has been an instructor at Tufts for over 10 years, teaching multimedia and visual arts courses offered through the Art History department. She also works in the Visual Resources Collection in the Tufts Department of Art and Art History where she manages the collection of digital and analog media for teaching and research. She also has an active personal practice making 2D, 3D and digital art.


EXP-0057-F: Documentary Film and Visual Rhetoric
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03985
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Aidekman 9


As more and more of our history, personal as well as global, is recorded and stored for posterity, an awareness of how images are constructed into persuasive arguments is perhaps more important today than ever. This course considers the development of documentary as visual rhetoric. Beginning with philosophical discussions of how photographs are able to create meaning, the course will go on to consider the origins of documentary in assembling newsreel into longer interpretive forms, the introduction of sound into documentary practice, the emergence of experimental documentary genres, the use of voice-over, the development of essay films of the 1960s, and the increasing importance of compilation films in a digital age. The course will combine close analysis of the material with film practice, which will consist of short filmmaking exercises in which students will work hands-on editing found footage to produce short video works based on formal techniques discussed in class.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Humanities and the Arts elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Practice elective.

Maxim Pozdorovkin is a documentary filmmaker who has directed and edited several films including the feature-length documentary, Capital, currently showing on the international film festival circuit. He is also a PhD candidate at Harvard University, currently completing a dissertation on the development of early Soviet documentary film.


EXP-0059-F: Sports Journalism in the Internet Age
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03986
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Barnum 114


The Internet has undeniably changed the media landscape, but sports journalism may be feeling the effects greater than any other sphere. Sports enthusiasts have the ability to watch every game on television or their laptops. Fans can find streaming stats on the web, read instant recaps and catch post-game conferences on various sports networks. So how do sports journalists maintain their relevance now – and in the future? Through analyzing the current landscape and studying works of sports journalism, this course will seek to answer this and such related questions as what constitutes quality sports journalism, what is the key to creating work that transcends the 24-hour news cycle, and why is the field perceived as struggling.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This course will count toward the Communications and Media Studies minor as a Humanities and the Arts elective.

Maria Burns Ortiz regularly contributes as a columnist to ESPN.com's "Page 2" section, dedicated to the intersection of sports, humor, pop culture, and the offbeat. She also writes on soccer, in particular the MLS.


EXP-0063-F: The American China Trade: People, Ships & Perceptions
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03987
Thursday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Barnum 114


What ideas and goods characterized the American China trade? How are our perceptions of another culture influenced by our own values and beliefs? How does cross-cultural understanding – or the lack thereof – affect not only individuals' but nations' experience? This course explores early U.S. trade with China and the values and perceptions of Americans engaged in that trade. It examines portrayals of that trade in written sources and in art, and provides participants with an opportunity to consider their own views of China and to compare and contrast them with those of the early American China-trade merchants and their families. As a basis of discussion and analysis, we will read diaries, letters and journals written by American residents in the Pearl River Delta, and will study depictions by both Chinese and Western artists of the communities and river-front that those Americans knew.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This class has been approved by the History Department to count toward the Humanities distribution requirement.

Susan Schopp is a member of the volunteer crew of Friendship of Salem, a full-size, fully operational reproduction East India ship berthed at the Salem Maritime National Historic Site in Salem, Mass. In 1998 she identified the wreck of an English East India Company ship in the South China Sea. She holds degrees in East Asian art history and museum studies from Ecole du Louvre in Paris.


EXP-0067-F: Understanding Anti-Americanism in Latin America
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03988
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, East 016


Why is there so much anti-US feeling in Latin America? What are the underlying causes? And what lessons can we learn from our relations with our southern neighbors? This class will analyze the roots of Anti-Americanism as the result of the interaction between Latin American politics and the United States' foreign policy. This class will not only analyze American interventions in Latin America, but also the agency of local elites. To analyze that process, we will examine specific cases such as Cuba, Guatemala, Chile, El Salvador, Nicaragua, and Panama. By the end of the semester, you will be prepared to design creative responses to future challenges in the hemisphere.

View PRELIMINARY course syllabus >

This class has been approved by the History Department to count toward the Humanities distribution requirement.

Cristobal Zuniga-Espinoza is a doctoral candidate in history at the State University of New York, Stony Brook, specializing in Foreign Relations between the United States and Latin America. His dissertation is titled "Struggling for Development: The making of the Alliance for Progress from an Inter-American perspective," which he will be presenting at the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations (SHAFR) 2010 Annual Conference. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Chile.


EXP-0075-F: Search and Seizure: An Introduction to Fourth Amendment Criminal Procedure
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03989
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Aidekman 9


This is the class for anyone that has ever gotten that sinking feeling in the pit of their stomach when they see blue lights in their rearview mirror or answers the door at a friend's apartment during a party only to be startled by a couple of scowling police officers. The answers to the question we ask ourselves in those moments – "What do I do!" or "Are they really allowed to do that?" – can be found in examining the opinions of the United States Supreme Court that discuss the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution. By studying these cases, we will explore some of the major rules that govern interactions between law enforcement and citizens in this country. Students will have weekly reading assignments that include reading Supreme Court opinions and supplementary materials and the course will culminate with students using their acquired knowledge in a moderated debate.

Julian Allatt is a practicing attorney who has studied criminal procedure extensively and has worked in the area of criminal defense. He's a graduate of Suffolk University Law School where he won the 3-4 Trial Competition.


EXP-0084-F: Law, Business, and Sports: A Study of the NBA
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03990
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Aidekman 9


Professional sports has evolved from the "mom and pop" environment of 30 years ago, to that of a sophisticated, high risk, high profile, "big business." Current events in pro sports are documented in virtually every major newspaper and periodical in the country. In our daily lives it's hard to avoid exposure to sports in some form or another, yet many off-field issues are confusing to the casual (and maybe not so casual) fan. This course is intended to make sense out of the confusion by providing an overview of the pro sports industry as a business. Subjects for inquiry will include the development of the National Basketball Association from the late 1960s through the present. Assigned readings will be principally from original N.B.A. operational documents, and will provide a fundamental understanding of the concepts, theories, and terms related to general sports business/legal issues, and the N.B.A. in particular.

Jan Volk currently serves as a consultant to a number of N.B.A. teams. After earning a J.D. from Columbia in 1971, he went to work for the Boston Celtics and, in 1984, was named General Manager, a position he held until May 1997. As GM, he was responsible for the acquisition, contractual negotiation, renegotiation, and ultimate signing of all Celtics players.


EXP-0091-AF: Inquiry Teaching Group
0.5 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03791
ARR, 96 Packard Avenue


Inquiry is a global-issues simulation for high school students, and forms an integral part of the year's activities for EPIIC. Students in this course will help design and enact a simulation on Our Nuclear Age, to be held during the Spring 2011 semester. In the process, students will mentor a high school delegation and prepare them for this simulation — helping them understand all the materials and issues involved.

Heather Barry is the Associate Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts.

Steve Cohen teaches in the Education department at Tufts.


EXP-0091-F: EPIIC: Our Nuclear Age: Peril and Promise
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03792
Tuesday and Thursday, 3:00-5:30 PM, Tisch 316


Against the backdrop of the nuclear arc of the history of the race for the atomic bomb and the secrecy and espionage of the Manhattan Project to President Obama's 2010 Nuclear Security Summit and beyond, EPIIC will explore our global nuclear future.

Nine countries control 23,000 nuclear weapons. During the Cold War, world superpowers amassed nuclear arsenals containing the explosive power of one million Hiroshimas. Two decades after the end of the Cold War the U.S. and Russia still have a combined total of more than 20,000 nuclear weapons. The American Academy in Berlin recently asserted that a Hiroshima size weapon detonated from inside the back of a large van in London's Trafalgar Square in the middle of a workday would cause an estimated 115,000 fatalities and another 149,000 injuries from a combination of blasts, fire, and radiation poisoning.

We will look at the history of failed and successful arms control regimes, the threat posed by both declining and rising nuclear states, how nuclear terror and catastrophe are rendered in popular culture, the dilemma of science in the service of military objectives, resource wars in Africa and elsewhere to control and exploit uranium, Israel's Osirak raid and concerns over temptations of preemptive strikes and preventive war, the proclaimed "nuclear renaissance" and the building of new nuclear energy plants, the relevance and ethics of deterrence thinking, and the political, diplomatic, civil and military complexities of proliferation case studies, including Pakistan, South Africa, Libya, Iran, and North Korea.

For more information go to http://www.tuftsgloballeadership.org/programs/epiic/colloquium.

This is a High Demand course. You MUST attend the first class meeting for a chance to enroll in the course.

Sherman Teichman is Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts, and the founding director of EPIIC (Education for Public Inquiry and International Citizenship). He holds an M.A. from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.


EXP-0096-F: Auditing for Breadth
0.5-1.0 credit, Pass/Fail
ARR


This program is intended to provide students with an opportunity to broaden their education by attending courses in which they might not otherwise enroll. With the approval of the instructors in question, students may elect to audit any three full-credit university courses (or the equivalent) during their four years as an undergraduate. (One course credit is awarded upon completion of the three audits.) Please note: graduating seniors may audit two courses and receive one-half credit.

For more information about this program and an application, contact Cindy Stewart, at the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Ave, x73384.

Cindy Stewart is the Assistant Director of the Experimental College.


EXP-0099-CF: Media Internships
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03794
ARR


Supervised internship in communications and mass media. Student can intern at a newspaper, magazine, book publishing company, film production company, television or radio station, advertising or public relations firm, or other media outlet approved by instructor. Students must intern a minimum of 150 hours during the semester (usually 12-16 hours a week), fulfill written assignments, and meet regularly with the instructor. Registration by consent of instructor. Student should consult with instructor prior to researching and applying for internships, and must submit an Internship Agreement signed by the internship site supervisor prior to being allowed to register.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For more information, contact contact the instructor, Susan Eisenhauer, at susan.eisenhauer@tufts.edu.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Practice elective.


Susan Eisenhauer (J '71) holds a M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Among other responsibilities, she directs the Communications internship program, supervising more than 90 students each year who intern for credit at various media organizations.


EXP-0101-CF: Advanced Filmmaking
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03795
ARR


Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who have completed EXP-0056-CS "Making Movies" – or who are able to demonstrate equivalent competence – can continue their training as filmmakers. Students who initially qualify will present a "business plan" for their project and, if accepted, will receive credit, access to TuftsFilmWorks' production and editing equipment, and a supervised context within which to work. In return, they agree to watch a negotiated number of "source" films, keep a "Producer's Log," and write a final assessment, taking into account both the process they went through to produce their film and their reaction to the film once it is done.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For information on eligibility and registration, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x73384.

Advanced Filmmaking is supported by the generosity of Lisa and Bruce Cohen ('J86 and 'A83, respectively).

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies Minor as a Media Practice elective and toward the Film Studies Minor as a Film Practice elective.


Howard Woolf is Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks (the ExCollege's filmmaking center), co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.


EXP-0102-CF: Advanced Electronic and Digital Media
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03796
ARR


Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who are able to demonstrate an appropriate degree of competence can continue their training in the multimedia arts.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For information on eligibility and registration, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x73384.
This course will count toward Media Practice credit for the Multimedia Arts minor and for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.


Howard Woolf is Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks (the ExCollege's filmmaking center), co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.


EXP-0192-F: Independent Study
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03799
ARR


By arrangement only. For more information, come by the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Avenue, or call x73384.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0192-PF: Independent Study
0.5-1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03800
ARR


By arrangement only. For more information, come by the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Avenue, or call x73384.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.

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Courses Open Only to Designated Students


EXP-0007-F: Writing Fellowship Seminar
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03783
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Crane Room, Paige Hall


This course explores current research in the field of composition. It is designed to provide theoretical grounding to the practice of peer tutoring and the teaching of writing. Students will study writing theory and consider its practical application in the classroom and the writing center. Topics will include: the role of peer tutors, conferencing techniques, writing in the disciplines, English as a Second Language, and discourse communities. Always, as we explore the issues pertaining to writing, we will be looking for meaning on a practical, as well as theoretical, level. Discussions of student papers will be a standard means of applying acquired knowledge to the reality of peer tutoring.

NOTE: This is a mandatory course for Writing Fellows and Writing Tutors and enrollment is limited to these groups.

Kristina Aikens received her MA in English from Simmons College in 2002 and her PhD from Tufts in 2008. At Tufts, she taught expository writing for four years. While pursuing her MA, she first began tutoring writing at Emmanuel College, and at Tufts she tutored both as a Graduate Writing Consultant and as a Graduate Writing Fellow. Kristina joined the ARC as Assistant Director, Writing Resources in January of 2010.

Carmen Lowe directs the Writing Fellows Program and the Academic Resource Center at Tufts University. She came to Tufts in 1994 to pursue graduate studies, earning a Ph.D. in English in 2003. She became Assistant Director of Writing Resources in Fall 2001 and Director of the ARC in June 2005. Carmen has co-taught The Writer's Craft since 2002.


EXP-0010-F: Moving From "Diversity" to Social Justice
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03784
Tuesday and Thursday, 4:30-5:45 PM, Jackson 5


We want a college with "diversity," but what does that mean? Once we find ourselves members of this "diverse" community, then what? This discussion course explores topics of diversity in the US that are seldom mentioned openly and are often misunderstood. When students of color sit together in the dining hall, why do we think they are "segregating" themselves? (Do we think the same of a group of white students?) How do we use words like "queer" and "gay"? And how do we understand classism on campus? We focus on social justice topics (power, privilege, and oppression) and relate them to our experiences growing up in the US. We see how the work of Tufts' Group of Six (Africana, Asian American, International, Latino, Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender, and Women's Centers) is inclusive and relevant to the lives of all Tufts students. We'll have opportunities for self-exploration and learning through readings, films, discussions, and interactive exercises. Is this for you? Definitely, if your mind opens onto a willingness to learn and be personally challenged in a supportive atmosphere.

NOTE: This is a first year advising seminar and enrollment is only open to those new students assigned to this section.

Linell Yugawa is the Director of the Asian American Center and on the Dean of Student Affairs staff at Tufts University. She has an M.Ed. and M.S.W. and a strong interest in social justice education which she incorporates in her work with student peer leadership training and her course, Moving Beyond "Diversity." She has taught this course since the Fall of 2002.


EXP-0011-F: Class Matters
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03785
Tuesday and Thursday, 4:30-5:45 PM, Latino Center


How do we define class in the United States? What is the relationship between socio-economic class and race and ethnicity? Do we live in a meritocracy? Do we all have an equal chance of achieving the American Dream? What does the current economic crisis reveal about class in the US? These and other questions will be the focus of this full credit, pass/fail advising course.

The current economic crisis and the growing inequality in the United States make it imperative that we understand the impact of class in America. This course will attempt to provide a safe environment where students from all walks of life can openly discuss these issues. The course will include readings, films, interactive activities, field trips and outside speakers. Additional topics to be discussed include financial aid, homelessness, Walmart, globalization, healthcare, the working poor, and the undocumented.

NOTE: This is a first year advising seminar and enrollment is only open to those new students assigned to this section.

Ruben Salinas Stern is the Director of the Latino Center at Tufts University.


EXP-0029-F: Looking at Science Through the Eyes of Other Disciplines
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03786
Wednesday, 7:00-8:15 PM, Metcalf Hall


The main theme of this interdisciplinary seminar for residents of Metcalf will revolve around science and how it impacts other disciplines such as politics and international relations. The press, television and public policy seem to show that science is being discussed on all levels of society and that solutions are being debated. To make this seminar most interesting and relevant, students will have the opportunity to help decide which topics will be discussed and presented. Join us to look at cases that have already happened and the future of science, in general.
Please Note: This course is designed for residents of Metcalf Hall as part of the Bridge Program. Permission of the instructor is required.

Ronnee Yashon is a Scholar in Residence at Metcalf Hall. She holds degrees in Biology, Chemistry, Computer Education, and Law. She has taught human genetics and general biology, as well as bioethics and the law for more than twenty years. She is also the author of a series, Case Studies in Bioethics, and a book entitled Landmark Legal Cases for Scientists.


EXP-0090-AF: Teaching an Explorations Seminar
1.5 credits, Pass/Fail, Call #03789
Monday, 12:00-12:50 PM; Thursday, 9:30-10:20 AM, 95 Talbot Avenue


This course is designed to facilitate undergraduate team-teaching for those leading first-semester seminars for incoming freshmen. Weekly group meetings will be held, in which student teachers will be exposed to a range of teaching techniques and theories, asked to articulate their course goals, and given a forum for discussing the unique problems that new teachers often encounter. Students will be required to keep journals, and reflect upon the concerns and questions that arise over the course of the semester.

Please Note: This is a mandatory course for students leading Explorations seminars, and enrollment is limited to these student-teachers.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0090-BF: Teaching a Perspectives Seminar
1.5 credits, Pass/Fail, Call #03790
Monday, 12:00-12:50 PM; Wednesday, 12:00-12:50 PM, Aidekman 9


Similar to the Explorations Seminar, this course supports students teaching a Perspectives course, all of whom will work under the umbrella topic of movies as both art and industry.

Please Note: This is a mandatory course for students leading Perspectives seminars, and enrollment is limited to these student-teachers.

Howard Woolf, Associate Director of the Experimental College, and Cindy Stewart, Assistant Director of the Experimental College, coordinate the Perspectives program.


EXP-0090-TF: Teaching Assistant Workshop
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #03991
ARR


This course is designed to assist the undergraduates who are teaching assistants for courses in the Experimental College.

Robyn Gittleman is Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education.


EXP-0190-BF: CMS Senior Colloquium
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03797
Wednesday, 12:00-12:50 PM, Anderson 210


All C.M.S. seniors thinking about completing a Senior Project must register for one of the two sections of the C.M.S. Senior Colloquium. The colloquium aims to help seniors develop their ideas, provides them with a forum for sharing resources and work strategies, and trains them in the scheduling and time management procedures necessary for successful completion of projects.

Please note: Registration for this course will be done in person with CMS Director Julie Dobrow. Bring an ADD form to her office at 95 Talbot Ave on Tuesday, Sept. 7, between 9:00 am and 2:00 pm.

Leslie Goldberg (J '84), the instructor for section BF, is the founder of Blue Sun Communications, a corporate communications consulting firm. Among her clients are the Tufts University College of Engineering. She holds a M.S. in Mass Communication from Boston University.


EXP-0190-CF: CMS Senior Colloquium
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #03798
Thursday, 9:30-10:20 AM, Anderson 210


All C.M.S. seniors thinking about completing a Senior Project must register for one of the two sections of the C.M.S. Senior Colloquium. The colloquium aims to help seniors develop their ideas, provides them with a forum for sharing resources and work strategies, and trains them in the scheduling and time management procedures necessary for successful completion of projects.

Please note: Registration for this course will be done in person with CMS Director Julie Dobrow. Bring an ADD form to her office at 95 Talbot Ave on Tuesday, Sept. 8, between 9:00 am and 2:00 pm.

Julie Dobrow is Director of the Communications and Media Studies and the Media and Public Service programs at Tufts. She holds a PhD in Communications from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania.

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