Courses

Summer 2009 Courses


First Summer Session


EXP-0020-A: Forensic Science and Criminal Investigation
1.0 credit, Letter-graded.
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00-9:30 PM


CSI, Law and Order, Dexter… add up the hours that TV devotes to crime-solving, and it's off the charts. But how real is it?

In this course students will be introduced to the realities of this fascinating process. Students will gain an understanding not only of crime-specific investigation procedure, but forensic science, the practice of criminalistics, and crime-scene processing.

This will be done by focusing on the steps involved in the aftermath of a criminal act, including discovery and police response, processing of the crime scene for physical evidence, forensic analysis, arrest, court presentation and pursuit of conviction. Finally, special emphasis will be placed on the presentation of evidence in a mock trial.

James Jabbour recently retired from his position as a Police Inspector in the Office of the Connecticut Chief State's Attorney. He has had more than twenty-five years experience in law enforcement, dealing with homicide, sexual assault, arson, and robbery. Inspector Jabbour holds a M.S. in Forensic Science with a concentration in Advanced Investigation and was appointed an Education Commissioner for the American College of Forensic Examiners in 2007.


EXP-0088-A: Understanding the Stock Market: History, Structure, and Impact
1.0 credit, Letter-graded.
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00-9:30 PM


One day it's up, the next it's down. One day the Dow is setting records, the next day a "market correction" ushers in gloom and doom. What makes the stock market tick?

In this course students will begin to develop an understanding of, and an appreciation for, the fundamentals of stock market investing in the context of larger social, demographic, political, and economic issues. Beginning with a brief historical overview, we will attempt to assess the significance of key time periods, such as 1929, 1973, and 1987. We will then move to a discussion of the unprecedented change that the market has undergone the last ten years.

Major themes in this discussion include the globalization of investing, the relationship between Social Security and the market, socially responsible investing, the impact of technology, and the mutual fund explosion.

Finally, special attention will be paid to the unique role the stockbroker plays in the investment process.

Timothy Stratford has had twenty years' experience as a financial services professional at brokerage houses such as Shearson Lehman Brothers and Smith Barney Harris and Upham.

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Second Summer Session


EXP-0007-B. Hindu Yoga and Buddhist Meditation
1.0 Credit, Letter-graded.
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00-9:30 PM


This course seeks to present a clear-eyed look at the teachings of two great spiritual traditions. We will undertake our investigation from both traditional and contemporary perspectives. In doing so, we will read such ancient texts as Patanjali's Yoga Sutras and such modern ones as Jack Kornfield's A Path with Heart. Parallel to the readings, we will practice yoga and meditation techniques weekly in class. In exploring the interface between practice and theory, students will be expected to write papers, keep a meditation journal, actively participate in class discussion, and keep up with their yoga and meditation outside the classroom.

Matthew Daniell has lived in Asia for many years, studying yoga and Buddhism firsthand from teachers and monks. A Tufts graduate (A '85), Matthew asked himself during his senior year if there wasn't more to life. This question led him on a spiritual journey that took him to Japan, Thailand, and India.

Ravi Nathwani has also studied and lived in Asia, residing with a Buddhist community in Japan. Ravi is certified in the Sirvananda yoga tradition and has training in the Ashtanga, Kripalu and Iyengar methods of yoga.


EXP-0032-B: Introduction to Game Development
One Course Credit. Letter-graded. Call # 00447.
Monday and Wednesday, 6:00-9:30 PM


How do you create a complete computer / video game from start to finish? What are the different elements to a game? What makes a great game? Computer game development requires all facets of Computer Science, including Computer Graphics, Artificial Intelligence, Algorithms, Data Structures, Networking, and Human-Computer Interaction. It also requires knowledge of other disciplines including Economics, Mathematics, Physics, and Psychology. The value of this course goes beyond culminating Computer Science. It is largely a hands-on course where real-world skills including design, teamwork, management, documentation and solid communications are critical. This course will delve into topics such as the game engine, sound, rendering, modeling, and the user interface.

This course will toward the Computer Science major but only for students who have completed COMP-0015 "Data Structures." It also counts as a Media Practice course for the Multimedia Arts minor and a Media Practice elective for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Ming Chow (A' 02, G '04) is currently an application developer and webmaster. He frequently educates and trains users on the fundamentals of computer security, software engineering, and engineering technologies. He holds a Masters in Computer Science from Tufts.


EXP-0174-B: Genetics, Ethics, and the Law
One Course Credit. Letter-graded. Call # 03774.
Monday, 5:30-8:15 PM. Cabot 206.


With recent pioneering discoveries in the field of genetics, a Pandora's box of questions has been opened regarding the efficacy and legality of genetic engineering. What are the impacts of such processes as the cloning of the human embryo, DNA testing, and mapping of the human genome? In this course, we will cover the scientific principles at work in such fields as genetic testing, human genetic defects, assisted reproduction, and biotechnology. At the same time, we will explore the legal and ethical issues raised by these new fields including confidentiality, insurance implications, DNA forensics, informed consent, the future of the Human Genome Project, and genetic screening. In addition, questions about paternity and family law problems involved with fertility engineering and surrogate motherhood will be examined. Finally, we will consider what new roles may emerge for attorneys involved in genetic cases.

This course has been approved by the Biology department to count toward the Natural Sciences distribution requirement.

Ronnee Yashon holds degrees in Biology, Chemistry, Computer Education, and Law. She has taught human genetics and general biology, bioethics and the law for more than twenty years. She is also the author of a series, Case Studies in Bioethics, and a book, Landmark Legal Cases for Scientists.

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12-Week Session


EXP-0099-CA: Media Internships
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail.
ARR


With the approval of the instructor, students can arrange a supervised internship at a newspaper, magazine, book publishing company, film production company, television or radio station, advertising or public relations firm, or other media outlet. Students must intern a minimum of 150 hours during the semester (usually 12-16 hrs/wk), fulfill written assignments, and meet regularly with the instructor. PLEASE NOTE: Students should consult with the instructor prior to researching and applying for internships, and must submit an Internship Agreement signed by the internship site supervisor prior to being allowed to register. Contact Susan Eisenhauer for more information. (susan.eisenhauer@tufts.edu, x72007)

Susan Eisenhauer (J '71) holds a M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Among other responsibilities, she directs the Communications internship program, supervising more than 90 students each year who intern for credit at various media organizations.


EXP-0099-CB: Media Internships
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail.
ARR


With the approval of the instructor, students can arrange a supervised internship at a newspaper, magazine, book publishing company, film production company, television or radio station, advertising or public relations firm, or other media outlet. Students must intern a minimum of 150 hours during the semester (usually 12-16 hrs/wk), fulfill written assignments, and meet regularly with the instructor. PLEASE NOTE: Students should consult with the instructor prior to researching and applying for internships, and must submit an Internship Agreement signed by the internship site supervisor prior to being allowed to register. Contact Susan Eisenhauer for more information. (susan.eisenhauer@tufts.edu, x72007)

Susan Eisenhauer (J '71) holds a M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Among other responsibilities, she directs the Communications internship program, supervising more than 90 students each year who intern for credit at various media organizations.

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