Courses

Fall 2009 Courses

This page was last updated 9/10/09.


Courses Open to All Students


EXP-0014-F: Becoming a Singer/Songwriter: The Art of the Ballad
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Eaton 203, Call #04191


Where can you meet Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Johnny Cash, Bruce Springsteen, and Dolly Parton? Where can you learn to write your own ballad? This course centers on the music of the heart and personal expression. We will study the form and history of the American ballad, its English roots, and basic music theory, in order to compose ballads inspired by our own lives. We will write a childhood ballad, an adolescent ballad, and an adult ballad focusing on moments of joy, pain, anger, rage, frustration, fear, desire, and love. The class will give a performance of their ballads at the end of the semester.

Terry Michael Chance has a doctorate in Fine Arts from Texas Tech University and has taught at both the University of Massachusetts/Lowell and Lesley University. At Lesley, he is also the Paul A. Kaplan Visiting Artist for the Oxford Street Players. In addition, he toured with Conway Twitty for 19 years as his rhythm guitar player and backup vocalist.


EXP-0019-F: Research for Success: Using the Library for Thesis and Capstone Projects
0.5 credit, Letter-graded
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Tisch 223, Call #04192


This is an eight-week course beginning on 9/22.

Are you thinking about writing an honors thesis your senior year? Would you like to get a head start or immediate help understanding the research process? Would you enjoy sharing what you learn as you become an expert in the subject area you are investigating? This course will introduce students to the major research tools and techniques at an intermediate-to-advanced level specific to their subject area. Each student will also develop a working bibliography of resources, as well as a plan for continuing his/her research.

PLEASE NOTE: This is an eight-week course.

Regina Raboin is the Science Reference Librarian and Reference Microforms/Current Periodicals Coordinator at Tisch Library.

Laurie Sabol is the Coordinator of Library Instruction at Tisch Library.


EXP-0022-F: Drug Addiction: Medical and Social Approaches
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Olin 110, Call #04193


What is drug addiction, and how do people become addicted? Are there unique properties of drugs that are involved in addiction? What are the effects of drug use on the individual, family, and society? Can family and friends do something to help an addicted individual struggle to free themselves from drug dependence? Is treatment available for drug addiction, and how do you prevent drug addiction problems in future generations?

In this course we examine these questions and possibly more. Students will grapple with these questions by reading and discussing course material and by interacting with guest lecturers speaking about their own drug addiction, substance abuse treatment professionals giving their views on treating addictions, and family members speaking about their relationship with addicted relatives.

Susan Moner is a medical doctor specializing in addiction and internal medicine. She has worked in addiction clinics and primary care in several large metropolitan areas for over 20 years. She is a Clinical Assistant Professor at Tufts School of Medicine.


EXP-0023-F: Forensic Anthropology
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 109, Call #04194


Forensic anthropologists play an essential role in diverse contexts where human skeletal remains are involved. TV shows in popular media such as Bones and CSI depict the contribution forensic anthropologists make in criminal investigations. In addition, forensic anthropologists are often called to the scene of mass disasters such as plane crashes or train wrecks and are increasingly involved in international human rights investigations. This course will explore the role of the forensic anthropologist in these scenarios and discuss the responsibilities and ethic considerations of working with human skeletal remains. In addition, the methodologies used to extract information on the life history of an individual (age, sex, stature, ancestry, pathology, trauma, etc.) will be presented.

This course has been approved to count toward Anthropology major credit.

Jennifer Bauder is currently a member of an international team working on human rights investigations on skeletal remains recovered from a mass grave dating to the Spanish Civil War. Over the past seven years she has assisted with forensic cases gaining experience in search and recovery, processing and analysis of remains and writing reports. She is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Anthropology at Binghamton University, where she specializes in bioarcheology, paleopathology and forensic anthropology. She taught this course previously in the ExCollege in Fall 2007.


EXP-0024-F: Introduction to Neuroscience, Neuroethics and the Future
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Olin 109, Call #04195


Can a brain scan tell if you are lying? If so, does this mean your thoughts are your own? Should students and professors use drugs to work harder and for longer hours? Should a member of my family get tested for future Alzheimer's disease if there is no cure? Can memories be erased if you want them to? Unlike the scientific issues underlying more well-publicized political issues such as energy, the ethical issues in neuroscience cut deep into the heart of the issue of human identity, and affect decisions about whom we afford rights and how we preserve these rights in the face of new technologies. For example, with the advent of more refined brain imaging techniques we face the possibility of being able to read the thought of another person. How then should we protect those thoughts and the rights from the Fifth Amendment? As we get better able to predict future psychiatric disease or criminal behavior, how do we act on this knowledge to preserve individual rights? This class will explore the ethical arguments in these issues as well as the neuroscientific realities of the debates.

Michelle Green has a B.S. in Psychobiology from USSC and is finishing her Ph.D. in Cognitive Science at MIT in July 2009. She believes strongly in both public education and questioning the ethical consequences of her actions, including her research.


EXP-0030-F: Sabermetrics: The Objective Analysis of Baseball
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, lane 100A, Call #04197


This course will teach the fundamentals of the emerging science of Sabermetrics, the objective analysis of baseball. We will discuss baseball, not through conventional wisdom and consensus, but by searching for real knowledge concerning the game of baseball. Hitting, pitching, fielding performance, along with other areas of sabermetrics, will be analyzed and better understood with the current and historical baseball data. Students will design and implement their own sabermetric research study , learning the important concepts in statistics and statistical analysis needed to perform this research.

Andy Andres, Ph.D. (N '99) is an Assistant Professor of Natural Science at Boston University, a Data Analyst at BaseballHQ.com, and a die-hard Red Sox fan.


EXP-0035-F: Rape Aggression Defense
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail
Tuesday, 4:00-6:00 PM, South Hall basement Lounge, Call #04198


The Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.) is based on the philosophy of choices: "to develop and enhance the OPTIONS of self defense, so that they become more viable considerations for the woman who is attacked."

While it is completely natural to resist, unless a woman is trained to do so the resistance she attempts may be futile. This course will try to strengthen innate survival techniques by making more options available. Preparation through education and training is usually the best way to survive an assault situation.

Issues that will be addressed include awareness and prevention, sexual assault definitions, patterns of encounter, the decision to resist, basic principles of self-defense, and the defensive mindset. This course will end with realistic simulation training.

Mark Roche is a member of the Tufts University Police Department and a certified R.A.D. instructor.


EXP-0037-F: Nonverbal Behavior and Perception in Cross-Cultural Context
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 111, Call #04200


Can you tell when someone is lying to you? How good is your "gaydar?" Our nonverbal behaviors speak volumes about us. From obvious cues like hand gestures to subtle cues like facial appearance, people are constantly influenced by others' nonverbal behavior and usually don't even know it. This course will introduce students to the practical and theoretical basics of the expression and perception of nonverbal cues. We will begin by classifying and coding nonverbal behaviors from the body, voice, and face. We will then discuss both practical applications of studying nonverbal behaviors, as well as what nonverbal behaviors can tell us about cognition and the mind. The focus will be on understanding how we produce and receive nonverbal messages and the consequences this has for our interactions with others.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Social Sciences elective.

Nicholas Rule is a fourth-year doctoral student in the Tufts Psychology Department. He earned a Master of Science from Tufts in experimental psychology in 2008 and a Bachelor of Arts from Dartmouth College in 2004. He is an internationally recognized expert in nonverbal behavior and face perception. His research has been featured in popular publications, such as Time, the Economist, and USA Today.


EXP-0038-F: Cultural and Racial Hybridity
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Thursday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 101, Call #04201


Who are you? Where are you from? How do you identify yourself? For many people, even those who have never traveled from the place they were born, these questions can be complex and difficult to answer. Hybrid and multiple identities are now an established fact for many people in the US and in reality, have been for at least two generations.

This course combines insights from anthropology, political science, international studies, ethnic and cultural studies to examine the issue of hybridity in the United States and elsewhere (case studies will include South Africa, the United Kingdom, France, China, Kenya and Hawaii). The course will emphasize the way multiple identities constrain, enlarge or encourage individual action and group membership. Identity is understood as a conscious and often political gesture couched in terms of ideologically-powerful concepts such as biology, heritage, gender, kinship, class, body and location.

Christopher Fung is a fourth generation Chinese New Zealander. He holds a Ph.D. from Harvard University and has taught at universities in Massachusetts, New Zealand and Hawaii. He plays traditional West African and Afro-Cuban drums, has lived in five different countries and considers himself culturally hybrid.


EXP-0042-F: The Right to Privacy in Modern America
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Monday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Robinson 153, Call #04203


From restrictions on handguns, to warrantless wiretapping, to a woman's right to choose, and a person's right to engage in private sexual relations, these are only a smattering of the issues relating to the right to privacy that keep arising before the Supreme Court. Even as we participate in a new era of government, the scope of the right to privacy remains at the forefront of the right to privacy and how the right may evolve in the modern world. We will concentrate on three particular areas: (1) privacy rights specifically enumerated in the Constitution, (2) privacy rights that have been read into the Constitution, and (3) emerging areas that may necessitate the extension or expansion of historically established concepts of privacy.

For each particular area, the course will focus equally on the historical, political, and sociological factors underlying the seminal cases, with students being challenged to explain how these factors defined, formed, and changed Constitutional law. Students will then critically analyze how these cases impacted individual freedoms and consider how present sociological and economic factors will affect future litigation and decisions.

Doug Martland is an Assistant Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He previously clerked for the Honorable Justice Gary Klatzmann of the Massachusetts Appeals Court and for the judges of the Superior Court of Massachusetts. Doug graduated magna cum laude from Suffolk Law School and with honors from Brown University, obtaining a B.A. in Public Policy and American History.

Steve Sharobem is an Assistant Attorney General for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. He previously clerked for the Honorable Justice William Cowin of the Massachusetts Appeals Court and for the judges of the Superior Court of Massachusetts. Steven graduated magna cum laude from Suffolk Law School and summa cum laude from Northeastern University, obtaining a B.A. in Political Science and Minors in American History and Philosophy.


EXP-0044-F: Technology and Interpersonal Violence
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Monday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Olin 102, Call #04204


What is sexting and how can it be used against you? Is the Internet lawless? This course will explore the idea that technology enables an entirely new way of committing, combating and thinking about the criminal justice system and victims. Our focus will be on interpersonal violence: bullying, stalking, domestic violence and sexual assault. Topics of discussion will include online social behavior and how this impacts trauma recovery, social growth and understanding of relationships. We will explore how technology accelerates and amplifies intimate partner violence. In this digital world, can a victim ever escape their abuser?

Through current news reports, related readings, case-studies, class discussion and group projects, we will work to advance our understanding of the relationship between interpersonal crime and technology, drawing upon the disciplines of criminology, sociology, psychology, and cultural studies.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Social Sciences elective.

Alexandra Detjens, M.S., is the City-Wide Violence Prevention Coordinator for Cambridge Public Health. She chairs both the Cambridge Domestic Violence Free Zone and Cambridge Health Alliance Domestic Violence Steering Committee. Her expertise in domestic violence spans over 15 years in a variety of settings: refugee camp, criminal justice system, hospital, community/state agencies and public health.

Kathryn Henderson, M.Ed, is National Programs Manager for Reach Out and Read. Her career focus has been education in the non-profit; including developing and delivering workshops for police, community, and municipality victim advocates.


EXP-0046-F: Environmental Action: Shifting from Saying to Doing
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 101, Call #04205


This course is designed for students who want a different way to examine the "truths" behind the environmental concerns in the news. Through the lens of psychology, social marketing and critical thinking, this course will examine the current environmental issues impacting our world. As students become environmentally literate they will also be given tools to examine their and their peers' personal behavior and learn how to create behavior change. This course aims to empower students to find their voice as they become leaders in environmental action; learning practical skills in communication, social marketing campaigns, and event planning. Activities during the semester will include: critical thinking research examining current environmental issues, personal challenges, campus social marketing group projects, and the opportunity to prepare for and host a symposium on peer-to-peer sustainability education with Boston-area colleges and universities. By the end of the semester students will leave this class with a new perspective of themselves, society and the environment.

This course will count toward Environmental Studies Track III.

Dallase Scott is a graduate student in the Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning program at Tufts. She spent two years as a Peace Corps Volunteer on the island of St. Lucia teaching environmental education classes with a focus on behavioral changes. She got her undergraduate degree in Psychology at California State University, Chico where her honors research project looked at correlations between lifestyle behaviors and environmental attitudes.

Tina Woolston joined the Office of Sustainability in September of 2007 and holds a B.S. and M.S. in Animal Science and Ruminant Nutrition from Cornell University. At Tufts she has worked on greening initiatives with the purchasing, publications, and dining departments. In addition, during Fall 2008, she started the Eco-Ambassador program for staff. Tina also has worked as the Program Manager for Sustainability at Earthwatch Institute, conducting emissions audits and office greening initiatives.


EXP-0050-CF: Media Literacy
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Monday, 1:30-4:00 PM, Rabb Room, Lincoln Filene Center, Call #04206


In a media-saturated world, endless possibilities exist for what we can watch, read, listen to, and create. Yet all too often, the flood of images overwhelms us, paralyzes us, and shapes our perceptions of ourselves, others and the world.

This class will focus on how we can deconstruct these images in order to use the media for positive social change, and avoid being used by it. We will examine media stereotypes of gender, ethnicity, race, and class, explore the role of the "citizen journalist," discuss the ways new media has changed the traditional media landscape, and think about the impact of media convergence and the ethical issues that arise when only a few corporations own the majority of news, entertainment, publishing, and internet outlets. Finally, by examining scholarly research, film clips, TV news and hearing guest speakers, we will focus on the importance of media literacy in our everyday lives, and how to use the media to become an active citizen.

This course represents a partnership between the Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service and the Communications and Media Studies program.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Social Sciences elective.

Julie Dobrow is Director of Communications and Media Studies and the Media and Public Service program at Tufts. She holds a Ph.D. in Communications from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania.


EXP-0052-CF: Facebook, Social Networking, and Community Organizing
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Rabb Room, Lincoln Filene Center, Call #04207


Young people are using Facebook and other social networking sites for fun, for career networking, and sometimes for social activism. CIRCLE (at Tufts) is developing new software that will plug into Faecbook. It helps residents of a metro area to map local civic networks to promote volunteerism, collaboration, activism, and problem-solving. Students in this course will use the software and will help to guide its development and its adoption at other Boston-area colleges. They will thereby develop skills that will be useful in workplace and civic settings. Students will support selected community groups by using the software to map local networks. (This will require some face-to-face interaction with the community partners.) The assigned readings will concern Facebook and other online social networks, traditional community networks, and how people can enhance networks for political or social purposes. Assignments will include readings, group mapping projects and presentations, regular blog postings about both the readings and projects, and a short final reflective essay.

This course represents a partnership between the Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service and the Communications and Media Studies program.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Social Sciences elective.

Peter Levine is Director of CIRCLE, The Center for Information and Research on Civic Learning and Engagement, and Research Director of Tufts University's Jonathan Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service. He graduated from Yale in 1989 with a degree in philosophy. He studied philosophy at Oxford on a Rhodes Scholarship, receiving his doctorate in 1992. From 1991 until 1993, he was a research associate at Common Cause. Levine is the author of The Future of Democracy: Developing the Next Generation of American Citizens (2007), four other scholarly books on philosophy and politics, and a novel. He also co-edited The Deliberative Democracy Handbook (2006) with John Gastil and Engaging Young People in Civic Life with Jim Youniss (in press).


EXP-0053-CF: Producing Films for Social Change
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Braker 2, Call #04208


Are you ready for an intensive, hands-on course that allows you to produce your own news documentaries? Do you care about social issues such as poverty, education, the environment, health care, human rights, gender and race? Are you interested in covering community issues and using documentary film to help inform the public?

This course will address the powerful role of video journalism as an advocacy tool to shape perceptions of policy and society. Students will learn the principles and techniques of documentary and TV news magazine journalism including directing, camera work, and editing. Special emphasis will be placed on the role of media ethics, First Amendment principles, and current news events. This course will also emphasize citizenship, active community leadership, and creative approaches to civic engagement. Class enrollment will be limited to sixteen students.

This course represents a partnership between the Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service and the Communications and Media Studies program.

This course will count toward Mass Communications and Media Studies minor credit as a Media Practice elective and toward Film Studies minor credit as a Film Practice elective. It also has been approved to count toward American Studies major credit.

Dacia Kornechuk holds a M.F.A. from Boston University in Film Production. She has worked on many projects in the film and video industry, ranging from owning her own video production company to working on nationally aired, feature length documentaries for WGBH. She produced two award-winning documentary films and since then has been committed to teaching documentary film and video production as a way for people to have a voice and document the untold stories in our world. She currently is head of the Media Technology department at Cambridge Rindge & Latin School.


EXP-0056-F: Reality Television
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Aidekman 9, Call #04209


How can we frame reality television in order to analyze it critically? What does our cultural obsession with this genre say about our perception of character, acting, and the self? Obviously a closer look into reality television begs the question "What is real?" This course will use social theory, theatrical framing, and current interdisciplinary research to look more closely at the history of reality television. We will also use short stories, films, and plays to assist class discussion. Ultimately our goal is twofold. We will question why reality television is persuasive and what it says about our society.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Humanities elective.

Clayton Drinko is a PhD candidate at Tufts in the Drama Department. Before studying at Tufts, he was a professional actor in New York and received his M.A. from New York University in Performance Studies.


EXP-0057-F: Feminist Perspectives on Pornography
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Monday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Braker 118, Call #04210


How has the representation of the human body in explicit art shaped the feminist movement? Has the public display of intimate sexual relationships had an effect on the way in which we view, and treat, each other's bodies?

This course aims to examine these questions by exploring the history of the modern feminist movement and how pornography and other forms of explicit art have shaped its assertions and actions, as well as its past, present, and future. Topics covered will include the "sex wars" debates of feminism in the 1970s and 1980s, the history of pornography and its transgression from theatrical to low budget, government and feminist censorship and regulation efforts and policy issues, voyeurism and representation of female sexuality, gender, and desire, sexual education tools, and modern developments and female pioneers in the ever-changing industry. Theoretical, social, cultural, and technological issues surrounding pornography and feminism will be incorporated in order to create a broader range of discussion and analysis.

This course has been approved to count toward the Women's Studies major.

TerryAnn Cuozzo is a graduate of Emerson College, with a Masters Degree in Media Arts and a BA in Film. She spent much of her graduate studies researching the rhetoric and ideas of the feminist movement beginning in the 1970s with the emergence of anti-pornography and anti-censorship leaders and writers.


EXP-0058-F: The Cartoonist in American Culture
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Thursday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Anderson 309, Call #04211


In this class we will examine the work of animators, cartoonists and entertainers whose comic works have enabled them to become household names. All of these artists work in distinct styles, but all favor caricature and exaggeration over pure realism. Their characters have invaded our collective unconscious and become part of our daily lives. Additionally, we will examine the various guises of the cartoonist, whether it be through comic books, strips, single panel cartoons, caricatures, animated films, puppet shows, plays or children's books. The cartoonist is not just an illustrator but is at heart a storyteller in an often misunderstood medium. By examining the history of these creators, as well as their work and influences, we can begin to understand humorous cartooning as a uniquely American art form.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Humanities elective.

Dave Kiersh is the recipient of the 2008 Xeric Award for comic book self-publishers and the creator of several comic books. He has also written about children's book cartoonists such as Don Freeman and Syd Hoff. As an illustrator, he has provided cartoons for a variety of magazines and publications. He holds a Master's Degree in Library Science from Queen's College where he wrote a thesis on the History of Comics Fandom.


EXP-0059-F: Native American Film
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Tisch 310, Call #04212


Native Americans have been portrayed in film since the beginnings of cinema history. However, the development of Native American films that speak directly to Native American concerns is a relatively new phenomenon that emerged during the 1970s. Since then, a distinctive Native American (or indigenous people's) aesthetic has evolved to encompass both political and artistic elements in the filmmaking process. By studying post-colonial and film theories, we will gain an understanding of the condition of indigenous groups in their society and film history in general. Many of the films that we will be covering are directed or written by Native Americans, but we will also be studying films that deal with indigenous groups outside of the United States and Canada.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Humanities elective and the Film Studies minor as a Film Studies elective.

Linda Lau is currently a Ph.D. student in the Department of Drama at Tufts University and has been a teaching assistant for two film courses (African American Theatre and Film and International Film Directors) at Tufts.


EXP-0064-F: Islam and Ethnicity
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Olin 101, Call #04213


Does ethnicity in Islam still exist? How much does Islam play a role in nationalism? This course will help examine these and other questions while studying the relationship between Islamic religious identity and ethnic identity in the Russian, Ottoman, and Indian Empires and their successor states. It will inquire into what extent Islam can substitute for, reinforce, or undermine ethnic identity based on theoretical and historical works.

Geoffrey F. Gresh has recently returned from teaching on a Fulbright program in Iraq and is currently a Fletcher PhD candidate writing his dissertation on Arabian Peninsula military base politics and maritime security. In addition to traveling extensively across Southwest Asia, he has lived one year in Turkey as a Rotary Ambassadorial School and one year in Cairo as an American University in Cairo Presidential Fellow.


EXP-0065-F: Healing Plants: Culture and Ecology in South America
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, East 016, Call #04214


How is illness and disease perceived in diverse cultures across the globe? What rituals and practices are used to remedy illness and promote health and healing? What role do plants play in these healing practices? How is cultural knowledge pertaining to medicinal plants and healing maintained in traditional societies? In this course students will examine these questions within the framework of cultural anthropology and ecology. Case-studies from instructors' field work in Brazil, Venezuela, and China will provide intricate examples of traditional communities' historical and contemporary healing practices. Discussions will provide the opportunity for critical analyses of healing modalities, cultural traditions and world development. Students will also learn the practice of ethnography to conduct research on health and healing systems in their local communities in the Boston area.

This course will count toward Environmental Studies Track III.

Selena Ahmed is a doctoral candidate in Plant Sciences at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and the Graduate Studies program of the New York Botanical Garden. Her teaching will draw from her field research experiences examining human-environment interactions in forest-dwelling communities in southwest China and the Venezuelan Amazon.

Angela Steward is a lecturer of Ecology at Northeastern University. She earned her PhD in Economics Botany from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and the Graduate Studies program of the New York Botanical Garden. She will largely teach from her field of experiences in the Brazilian Amazon studying nature-culture interactions among Afro-Brazilian and Caboclo communities.


EXP-0069-F: Talking With the Enemy
0.5 credit, Letter-graded
See note about days and times below, Location TBD, Call #04284


Through a detailed investigation of eight significant case studies, this course will take a close look at past efforts of the United States to manage relations with "enemies" or adversaries. The course will examine the different strategies Presidents have used to "talk to the enemy": Roosevelt's 1933 opening of relations with the USSR, the decision at Munich to "appease" Hitler, Nixon's opening to China, the long-delayed efforts to cease the war in Vietnam, the decision to invade Iraq in 2003, and the current debate over whether the US should talk directly with Iran and how best to deal with Cuba. The course will conclude with some examination of how the US might deal with groups in the new paradigm -- non-state actors such as Taliban, Hamas, and Hezbollah.

Please Note: This course will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 12noon-2pm on SOME weeks during the semester (Sept 29, Oct 1, Nov 3, Nov 5, Nov 10, Nov 12, Dec 1, Dec 3). There will be an IMPORTANT INFORMATION SESSION on THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 10 at 12noon.
Email Adam Levy for the location.

Ambassador William Luers is former President of the United Nations Association of the USA, and a 31-year veteran of the US Foreign Service. He served as US Ambassador to Czechoslovakia and Venezuela and held numerous posts in Italy, Germany, the Soviet Union, and in the Department of State.


EXP-0070-F: The Law, Reproductive Rights, and New Technologies
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Olin 116, Call #04215


"Where DO parents come from?" Moving at a startling pace since the 1978 birth of the first "test-tube baby," advances in reproductive technology have continued to grow, and now present us with options for creating families that were scarcely deemed possible even 25 years ago. This course intends to examine the law and policy behind such techniques as donor eggs, "collaborative reproduction," freezing sperm, eggs, and embryos, the use of surrogates, and pre-implantation genetic testing of embryos (PGD). We will also explore the families such techniques create, as well as the political and ethical tensions they engender.

Susan Crockin (J '76) is the Principal of Crockin Law and Policy Group, LLC, a private law and consulting practice focused on reproductive technology and genetics, adoption, and embryo law. She writes a column for the American Society of Reproductive Technology News and is a consultant to the Genetics and Public Policy Center in Washington, DC.

Kathryn Go, Ph.D., is the Scientific and Laboratory Director at the Reproductive Science Center of New England in Lexington, MA. Dr. Go received her Bachelor's degree in Biology and Doctor of Philosophy in Molecular Biology from the University of Pennsylvania and completed a post-doctoral fellowship in the Department of Physiology and Biochemistry at the Medical College of Pennsylvania.


EXP-0072-F: Climate Change and the Law
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Thursday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 203, Call #04216


What is the most efficient and effective way for the U.S. to regulate greenhouse gas emissions? What are the options? Following the Supreme Court's landmark decision in Massachusetts v. EPA, this course explores climate change from a legal perspective. We will look at the Kyoto Protocol, carbon offsets, state and federal options, and the science of climate change. Students will learn how to read and think critically about legal issues affecting a new and dynamic area of law.

This course will count toward Environmental Studies Track III.

Lisa Hodes is an environmental attorney at Breenberg Traurig LLP. Ms. Hodes has advised clients on a variety of environmental matters, including climate change. She has also distinguished herself as a leader within Greenberg Traurig on climate change issues by writing various articles, speaking at conferences and as an active member of Greenberg Traurig's Climate Change Task Force and Carbon Credits Group.


EXP-0074-F: Wrongful Convictions and the US Criminal Justice System
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Eaton 204, Call #04217


By examining the broad range of factors that contribute to the wrongful conviction of the innocent, this course will provide students with critical insights into the functioning of the US criminal justice system. We will explore the role played be faculty eyewitness-identification procedures; problematic police investigative and interrogation procedures; the mishandling of confidential informants, cooperating witnesses, and jailhouse snitches; overzealous prosecutors; the role of institutional pressures on the police and prosecutors; the abuse of junk science; incompetent forensic experts and corrupt crime labs; and ineffective defense lawyers. We will also examine the role of stereotypes, biases, tunnel vision, and race. We will look at some of the post-conviction legal procedures and strategies used to free the wrongfully convicted. Finally, we will explore some of the reforms that have been proposed and some of the critiques - from both the left and the right - of the innocence movement, with its reliance on DNA technologies, and its narrow focus on the "factually innocent." Films and case studies will ground our discussion in concrete examples.

Michael Schneider is a practicing criminal defense and civil liberties lawyer and a partner at the Boston law firm of Salsberg & Schneider. Much of his time is spent litigating criminal appeals and post conviction motions in the state and federal courts. He has taught and supervised law students at the Harvard Defenders program at Harvard Law School. Since 1997, he has served as Of Counsel to The Spangenberg Group and has consulted with human rights projects in Cambodia, Chile, China, and South Africa, and with domestic legal-aid projects.


EXP-0084-F: The Business of Sports: A Study of the NBA
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Aidekman 13, Call #04218


Professional sports has evolved from the "mom and pop" environment of 30 years ago, to that of a sophisticated, high risk, high profile, "big business." Current events in pro sports are documented in virtually every major newspaper and periodical in the country. In our daily lives it's hard to avoid exposure to sports in some form or another, yet many off-field issues are confusing to the casual (and maybe not so casual) fan.

This course is intended to make sense out of the confusion by providing an overview of the pro sports industry as a business. Subjects for inquiry will include the development of the National Basketball Association from the late 1960s through the present. Assigned readings will be principally from original NB.A. operational documents, and will provide a fundamental understanding of the concepts, theories, and terms related to general sports business/legal issues, and the NB.A. in particular.

Jan Volk currently serves as a consultant to a number of N.B.A. teams. After earning a J.D. from Columbia in 1971, he went to work for the Boston Celtics and, in 1984, was named General Manager, a position he held until May 1997. As GM, he was responsible for the acquisition, contractual negotiation, renegotiation, and ultimate signing of all Celtics players.


EXP-0087-F: Microfinance
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Wednesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Olin 108, Call #04219


What if you could give $25 to a business owner in an underdeveloped nation and the impact would be they could feed, educate, and clothe their children for the next 10 months? Would you believe this is possible? In the world of microfinance anything is possible and extraordinary results can be achieved. In this course, we'll address how these achievements are possible and take a comprehensive look at microfinance and its impact on people and societies. After forming a solid understanding of the various products offered under the microfinance umbrella (i.e., microcredit, microsavings, microinsurance), we'll collaborate to examine opportunities for domestic and international microfinance initiatives. In-depth case studies will be incorporated into the course to illustrate differences in microfinance lending models used in Afghanistan, Sierra Leone, and Cambodia.

Adam Grenier was selected as a Fellow with Kiva.org, a leading online microfinance lending community whose mission is to connect people through lending for the sake of alleviating poverty. He worked with Salone Microfinance Trust (SMT) in Sierra Leone, a non-governmental organization that serves the financial needs of 5,300+ economically active poor.


EXP-0091-AF: Inquiry Teaching Group
0.5 credit, Letter-graded
ARR, 96 Packard Avenue, Call #04222


Inquiry is a global-issues simulation for high school students, and forms an integral part of the year's activities for EPIIC. Students in this course will help design and enact a simulation on Global Cities, to be held during the Spring 2009 semester. In the process, students will mentor a high school delegation and prepare them for this simulation — helping them understand all the materials and issues involved. Students in Inquiry will receive one credit for the full academic year.

Steve Cohen teaches in the Education department at Tufts.

Heather Barry is the Associate Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts.


EXP-0091-F: EPIIC: Politics, Conflict and Culture in South Asia
1.0 credit, Letter-graded
Tuesday and Thursday, 3:00-5:30 PM, Barnum 008, Call #04223


Prosperous. Perilous. Stable. Anarchic. Democratic. Authoritarian. Corrupt.

This, and much more, describes one of the most dauntingly complex regions of the world: South Asia.

All of the South Asian states – Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, Bangladesh, Nepal, and Sri Lanka – are contending with momentous changes, both internally and globally. The region is home to three of the world's ten most populated countries, two of the world's nine nuclear weapons states, and the world's most corrupt country for five of the last eight years. Political instability, economic instability, poverty, natural disasters, and religious, ethnic and cultural clashes are abundant. It is at once one of the world's most dangerous and most promising of areas. For more information go to www.epiic.org.

This course is structured as HIGH DEMAND. Interested students must go to the first class in order to have a chance at being selected.

Sherman Teichman is Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts, and the founding director of EPIIC (Education for Public Inquiry and International Citizenship). He holds an M.A. from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.


EXP-0096-F: Auditing for Breadth
0.5-1.0 credit, Pass/Fail
ARR, Call #04224


This program is intended to provide students with an opportunity to broaden their education by attending courses in which they might not otherwise enroll. With the approval of the instructors in question, students may elect to audit any three full-credit university courses (or the equivalent) during their four years as an undergraduate. (One course credit is awarded upon completion of the three audits.) Please note: graduating seniors may audit two courses and receive one-half credit.

For more information about this program and an application, contact Robyn Gittleman or Cindy Stewart, at the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Ave, x73384.


EXP-0099-CF: Media Internships
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail
ARR, Call #04225


Supervised internship in communications and mass media. Student can intern at a newspaper, magazine, book publishing company, film production company, television or radio station, advertising or public relations firm, or other media outlet approved by instructor. Students must intern a minimum of 150 hours during the semester (usually 12-16 hours a week), fulfill written assignments, and meet regularly with the instructor. Registration by consent of instructor. Student should consult with instructor prior to researching and applying for internships, and must submit an Internship Agreement signed by the internship site supervisor prior to being allowed to register.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For more information, contact Susan Eisenhauer, Associate Director of Communications and Media Studies, 95 Talbot Avenue, x72007, susan.eisenhauer@tufts.edu.

This course will count toward Mass Communications and Media Studies minor credit as a Media Practice elective and toward Film Studies minor credit as a Film Practice elective.

Susan Eisenhauer (J'71) has a B.A. in English from Tufts and a M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. She has worked in many areas of media, including print journalism, television, radio, and public relations. Among other responsibilities, she directs the internship program, supervising more than 90 students each year who intern for credit at media organizations.


EXP-0101-CF: Advanced Filmmaking
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded
ARR, Call #04226


Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who have completed EXP-0056-S "Making Movies" – or who are able to demonstrate equivalent competence – can continue their training as filmmakers. Students who initially qualify will present a "business plan" for their project and, if accepted, will receive credit, access to TuftsFilmWorks' production and editing equipment, and a supervised context within which to work. In return, they agree to watch a negotiated number of "source" films, keep a "Producer's Log," and write a final assessment, taking into account both the process they went through to produce their film and their reactioni to the film once it's done.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For information on eligibility and registration, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x73384.

Advanced Filmmaking is supported by the generosity of Lisa and Bruce Cohen (J86 and A83, respectively).

This course will count toward Mass Communications and Media Studies minor credit as a Media Practice elective and toward Film Studies minor credit as a Film Practice elective.

Howard Woolf is Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks (the ExCollege's filmmaking center), co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.


EXP-0102-CF: Advanced Electronic and Digital Media
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded
ARR, Call #04227


Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who are able to demonstrate an appropriate degree of competence can continue their training in the multimedia arts.

Please note: Enrollment is by consent only. For information on eligibility and registration, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, x73384.

This course will count toward Media Practice credit for the Multimedia Arts minor and for the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor.

Howard Woolf is Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks (the ExCollege's filmmaking center), co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.


EXP-0192-F: Independent Study
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded
ARR, Call #04230


By arrangement only. For more information, come by the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Avenue, or call x73384.

Back to top >


Courses Open Only to Designated Students


EXP-0007-F: The Writer's Craft: Practical and Theoretical Approaches
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail
Tuesday and Thursday, 4:30-5:45 PM, Anderson 313, Call #04189

This course explores current research in the field of composition. It is designed to provide theoretical grounding to the practice of peer tutoring and the teaching of writing. Students will study writing theory and consider its practical application in the classroom and the writing center. Topics will include: the role of peer tutors, conferencing techniques, writing in the disciplines, English as a Second Language, and discourse communities. Always, as we explore the issues pertaining to writing, we will be looking for meaning on a practical, as well as theoretical, level. Discussions of student papers will be a standard means of applying acquired knowledge to the reality of peer tutoring.

NOTE: This is a mandatory course for Writing Fellows and Writing Tutors and enrollment is limited to these groups.

Amalia Jiva has an M.S. in Applied Linguistics and is currently pursuing an interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Interpretation Theory, Literature, and Religion through Boston University's University Professors Department. Amalia joined the staff of the ARC and Writing Fellows Program in August 2005 and has co-taught The Writer's Craft course since 2005.

Carmen Lowe directs the Writing Fellows Program and the Academic Resource Center at Tufts University. She came to Tufts in 1994 to pursue graduate studies, earning a Ph.D. in English in 2003. She became Assistant Director of Writing Resources in Fall 2001, and Director of the ARC in June 2005. Carmen has co-taught The Writer's Craft since 2002.


EXP-0010-F: Moving Beyond "Diversity"
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail
Tuesday and Thursday, 4:30-5:45 PM, Aidekman 13, Call #


We want a college with "diversity," but what does that mean? Once we find ourselves members of this "diverse" community, then what? This discussion course explores topics of diversity in the U.S. that are seldom mentioned openly. For example, when students of color sit together in the dining hall, why do we think they are "segregating" themselves? Do we ever think the same of a group of white students? How do we use words like "queer" and "gay"? And how do we understand class privilege? We will focus on topics (e.g. stereotypes, power, privilege, oppression) and experiences related to growing up in the U.S., especially as they pertain to the work of the Group of 6 (Africana, Asian American, International, Latino, Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender, and Women's Centers). We'll have opportunities for self-exploration through readings, discussions, and interactive exercises. Is this for you? Definitely, if your mind opens onto a willingness to learn and be personally challenged in a supportive atmosphere.

NOTE: This is a first year advising seminar and enrollment is only open to those new students assigned to this section.

Linell Yugawa is the Director of the Asian American Center and on the Dean of Student Affairs staff at Tufts University. She has an M.Ed. and M.S.W. and a strong interest in social justice education which she incorporates in her work with student peer leadership training and her course, Moving Beyond "Diversity." She has taught this course since the Fall of 2002.


EXP-0011-F: Class Matters
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail
Tuesday and Thursday, 4:30-5:45 PM, Latino Center, Call #04190


How do we define class in the United States? What is the relationship between socio-economic class and race and ethnicity? Do we live in a meritocracy? Do we all have an equal chance of achieving the American Dream? What does the current economic crisis reveal about class in the US? These and other questions will be the focus of this full credit, pass/fail advising course.

The current economic crisis and the growing inequality in the United States make it imperative that we understand the impact of class in America. This course will attempt to provide a safe environment where students from all walks of life can openly discuss these issues. The course will include readings, films, interactive activities, field trips and outside speakers. Additional topics to be discussed include financial aid, homelessness, Walmart, globalization, healthcare, the working poor, and the undocumented.

NOTE: This is a first year advising seminar and enrollment is only open to those new students assigned to this section.

Ruben Salinas Stern is the Director of the Latino Center at Tufts University.


EXP-0029-F: Looking at Science Through the Eyes of Other Disciplines
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail
Wednesday, 7:00-8:15 PM, Metcalf Hall Lounge, Call #04196


The main theme of this interdisciplinary seminar for residents of Metcalf will revolve around science and how it impacts other disciplines such as politics and international relations. The press, television and public policy seem to show that science is being discussed on all levels of society and solutions are being debated. To make this seminar most interesting and relevant, students will have the opportunity to help decide which topics will be discussed and presented. Join us to look at cases that have already happened and the future of science, in general.

Please Note: This course is designed for residents of Metcalf Hall as part of the Bridge Program. Permission of the instructor is required.

Ronnee Yashon holds degrees in Biology, Chemistry, Computer Education, and Law. She has taught human genetics and general biology, as well as bioethics and the law for more than twenty years. She is also the author of a series, Case Studies in Bioethics, and a book entitled, Landmark Legal Cases for Scientists.


EXP-0090-AF: Teaching an Explorations Seminar
1.5 credits, Pass/Fail
Monday, 12:00-12:50 AM; Thursday, 9:30-10:20 AM, 95 Talbot Avenue, Call #04220


This course is designed to facilitate undergraduate team-teaching for those leading first-semester seminars for incoming freshmen. Weekly group meetings will be held, in which student teachers will be exposed to a range of teaching techniques and theories, asked to articulate their course goals, and given a forum for discussing the unique problems that new teachers often encounter. Students will be required to keep journals, and reflect upon the concerns and questions that arise over the course of the semester.

Note: 90AF is a mandatory course for students leading Explorations seminars, and enrollment is limited to these student-teachers.

Note: 90AF is a mandatory course for students leading Explorations seminars, and enrollment is limited to these student-teachers.

Robyn Gittleman, Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education, coordinates the Explorations program.


EXP-0090-BF: Teaching a Perspectives Seminar
1.5 credits, Pass/Fail
Monday & Wednesday, 12:00-12:50 PM, Eaton 204, Call #04221


Similar to the Explorations Seminar, this course supports students teaching a Perspectives course, all of whom will work under the umbrella topic of movies as both art and industry.

Note: 90BF is a mandatory course for students leading Perspectives seminars, and enrollment is limited to those student-teachers.

Howard Woolf, Associate Director of the Experimental College, and Cindy Stewart, Assistant Director of the Experimental College, coordinate the Perspectives program.


EXP-0190-BF: CMS Senior Colloquium
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail
Wednesday, 12:00-12:50 PM, Anderson 210, Call #04228


All C.M.S. seniors thinking about completing a Senior Project must register for one of the two sections of the C.M.S. Senior Colloquium. The colloquium aims to help seniors develop their ideas, provides them with a forum for sharing resources and work strategies, and trains them in the scheduling and time management procedures necessary for successful completion of projects.

Please note: Registration for this course will be done in person with CMS Director Julie Dobrow. Bring an ADD form to her office at 95 Talbot Ave on Tuesday, Sept. 8, between 9:00 am and 2:00 pm.

Leslie Goldberg (J '84), the instructor for section BF, is the founder of Blue Sun Communications, a corporate communications consulting firm. Among her clients are the Tufts University College of Engineering. She holds a M.S. in Mass Communication from Boston University.


EXP-0190-CF: CMS Senior Colloquium
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail
Thursday, 9:30-10:20 AM, Anderson 210, Call #04229


All C.M.S. seniors thinking about completing a Senior Project must register for one of the two sections of the C.M.S. Senior Colloquium. The colloquium aims to help seniors develop their ideas, provides them with a forum for sharing resources and work strategies, and trains them in the scheduling and time management procedures necessary for successful completion of projects.

Please note: Registration for this course will be done in person with CMS Director Julie Dobrow. Bring an ADD form to her office at 95 Talbot Ave on Tuesday, Sept. 8, between 9:00 am and 2:00 pm.

Julie Dobrow is Director of Communications and Media Studies and the Media and Public Service program at Tufts. She holds a Ph.D. in Communications from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania.