Courses

Fall 2007 Courses


EXP-0113-F: The Social Web: MySpace, YouTube, and Community Building Online
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Miner 112
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04063

What has happened to the World Wide Web? How did we get from Yahoo, Amazon, and "subscription" sites to blogs, wikis, and virtual worlds?

This course will examine the growth of the "social web" and will do so by looking at the cultural and technological trends that have contributed to its growth. As well, employing a hands-on approach, we will focus on a different type of social software each week, including blogs, wikis, virtual gaming worlds, and such web sites as YouTube, Flickr, and del.icio.us.

Finally, we will pay special attention to significant innovation in the area of social software which has, in turn, supported new ways to build online communities and support large-scale collaboration. We will learn about this emerging class of software through student observation, the use of various applications, and discussion of important of topics in contemporary social software research.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Social Science elective and will count toward the Multimedia Arts minor as well.

David R. Millen
is a manager of social software research at IBM Research in Cambridge, MA. His group develops new social software applications, and explores the social, business, and technological implications of these new tools through field studies with small teams and communities. Recent projects include the Instant Collaboration/Activity Explorer and the Dogear Social Bookmarking Service. He holds a Ph.D. in Cognitive Psychology from Rutgers University.


EXP-0114-F: Investing in Stocks: Contexts, Theory, and Practice
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Tisch 304
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04064

Have you ever wondered why stocks go up and sometimes skyrocket? Think Google or Microsoft, or even the once-despised Apple. And have you ever wondered why – much to the grief of investors – stocks go down? Think Enron, WorldCom, or even highly-regarded Motorola. Do you know that, despite the stock market's upward bias, the majority of individual investors don't beat the market?

This course will review a range of possible investments – from bank accounts to hedge funds – however our main focus will be on stocks. We will study the following topics: screening for potential stock investments, sizing up a corporation, understanding corporate financial statements, understanding styles of investing, learning some of the tools used to evaluate stocks for investment, and appreciating psychological sources of investor mistakes. We will also consider the ways in which investors attempt to use the market as a means to generate capital for such large expenses as a car, a house, or retirement. This course will be useful to beginners and beyond, but be prepared to cover a considerable amount of material.

Steven Manos has been Executive Vice President of Tufts University since 1981 and is an avid individual investor. He developed his understanding of investing through evaluating money managers for the American Bar Association and Tufts University and through his own investing experience over the course of 25 years. His interest in business goes back to a brief stint as a corporate lawyer on Wall Street many years ago. He currently serves as an arbitrator for the National Association of Security Dealers. He holds a J.D. and M.P.A. from New York University.


EXP-0115-F: Decoding the Truth: An Introduction to Forensic Anthropology
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 333
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04065

Crime, disaster, human rights investigations, medical research…forensic anthropologists play an essential role in diverse contexts involving human skeletal remains.

This course will explore the many sides of forensic anthropology. We will look at its depiction in such popular TV shows as Bones and CSI and discuss the contributions that forensic anthropologists make in actual criminal investigations as well. In addition, we will delve into how forensic anthropologists participate in the identification of persons who are involved in plane crashes, train wrecks, and who are the victims of human-rights violations. While doing so, we will focus on the responsibilities and ethical considerations attendant upon working with human skeletal remains.

Finally, an emerging area of forensic work, the methodologies used to extract information on the life history of an individual (age, sex, stature, ancestry, pathology, trauma, and the like), will be presented.

This course has been approved to count toward Anthropology major credit.

Jennifer Bauder
is currently a member of an international team working on human rights investigations on skeletal remains recovered from a mass grave dating to the Spanish Civil War. Over the past seven years she has assisted with forensic cases gaining experience in search and recovery, processing and analysis of remains and writing reports. She is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Anthropology at Binghamton University, where she specializes in bioarcheology, paleopathology and forensic anthropology.


EXP-0117-F: Politics of Memory in the Turkish-Armenian Conflict
Monday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Eaton 201
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04067

Can history ever be objective? Can conflicting narratives that lead to a protracted discord ever be reconciled?

This course is an attempt to address such questions. It will function as an interdisciplinary seminar that combines theories regarding collective memory with the practice of conflict resolution. We will pay close attention to the differences between historical events and the memories engendered by those events, especially in relation to the construction and dynamics of the interaction between identity groups in conflict.
 
After examining case studies from South African, Guatemalan, Northern Irish and Cambodian conflicts, the course will focus on the Turkish-Armenian case as an example of a seemingly irreconcilable identity-based conflict and will attempt to demonstrate methods that may, in fact, lead to reconciliation.

Ceren Ergenc
is trained as a conflict resolution facilitator, was an election supervisor in Kosovo, and has worked as a co-facilitator of a Turkish/Armenian Dialogue Group in Boston. She is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Political Science at Boston University.

Phil Gamaghelyan
has served as a consultant with Turkish-Armenian Dialogues, the Inter-Communal Violence and Reconciliation Project – a joint initiative of the Harvard Humanitarian Initiative and the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. He also founded and co-facilitated the Turkish/Armenian Dialogue Group that unites graduate students from Boston-area universities. He holds an M.A. in Conflict Resolution from Brandeis University.


EXP-0118-F: Intro to Race Car Design
Tuesday and Thursday, 6:00-7:15 PM, Tisch 314
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04068

This course will focus on the engineering considerations involved in designing and building a race car. Working in teams, students will create a prototype, taking into consideration all the relevant elements including the engine, transmission, suspension and chassis. As well, such critical issues as fuel efficiency, power, ride, and aerodynamics will be considered at relevant points throughout the process. While the coursework will involve numerical and CAD design, it should still be accessible to all majors and years.

Erica Belmont
has been an autocross driver and races amateur road courses. She is currently a graduate student in mechanical engineering at Tufts and received her B.S. in chemical engineering from Tufts as well.

Joe Neal
raced Superbike motorcycles professionally for two seasons with Team Wolf Racing on the national AMA circuit. In addition, he has drag racing experience piloting "Funny Cars." He has returned to college after a number of years in running his own company and is currently an English major at Tufts.


EXP-0120-F: Endangered Waters: Human Interaction with Ocean Ecosystems
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Anderson 210
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04070

Can the ocean survive what we do to it? What will happen to us if we continue to stress the world's ocean?

This course is grounded in a consideration of the ocean's astounding biological complexity, its hold on the human imagination, and its use – and abuse – as a natural resource. We will delve into key issues in marine policy and research, exploring a wide range of contexts including the philosophy of science, the ethics of marine policy and management, and the role of science in society. As well, special attention will be paid to such pressing concerns as global climate change, ocean pollution, the depletion of fisheries, and the rise in the incidence of red tide.

This course has been approved to count toward Environmental Studies credit under Track III – Environment and Society.

Stacy DeRuiter
is doing research on the acoustics and foraging ecology of toothed whales, including sperm whales, beaker whales, and harbor porpoises; one goal of her work is to understand how human activities affect marine mammal populations. She is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the MIT/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute Joint Program.


EXP-0121-F: The Politics of Coffee: Trade, Power, and Culture
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 108
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04071

How often do you think about what goes into your morning cup of coffee? Did you know that coffee is the second-most traded commodity in the world and provides a living for millions of people?

This course will combine elements of political science, history, economics, international relations, and ethnobotany in order to explore the story of coffee. We will consider the uses of coffee in indigenous cultures, trace the origins of the coffee trade, delve into the evolution of the western taste for coffee and the social customs that developed – and continue to develop – around coffee drinking. The economic, political and ecological ramifications of this phenomenon will be given special consideration.

At the same time, students will have the opportunity to learn about and taste the varieties of coffee grown today around the world.

Dan Hoagland
has been a barista for a number of years at a certain well-known coffee chain, using the skill and knowledge he has developed to support himself while writing his graduate thesis in Political Science at Suffolk University where he also has served as a TA for a number of courses.


EXP-0122-F: Photography in the Digital Age: Privacy, Ethics, and Experimentation
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30, Aidekman 12
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04072

What is the future of photography in the digital age? Is the advent of advanced digital technology making every cell phone user a photographer? How will these changes affect you…as a citizen, a consumer, and a photographer?

In this course, we will begin with a survey of key dimensions in the history of photography, including technological innovations, key personalities, and the stories behind famous images. We will debate privacy and copyright laws and the ethics of photo retouching in journalism. And we will hear from photographic professionals about their new roles in the changing industry. Museum and gallery visits will complement multimedia and DVD presentations on the topic of photography as art.
 
At the same time, practical demonstrations in alternative image making techniques (historical processes, Polaroid manipulations, camera-less photographs, and special effects), current digital software, and photographic framing will be presented. Students will complete a variety of photographic assignments (digital or film) for assessment.

This course has been approved by the Art and Art History department to count toward the Arts distribution requirement. It will also count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as an Humanities and the Arts elective and toward the MultiMedia Arts minor.

Kristin Gleason
is a practicing fine-art photographer and has taught black and white and color photography, graphic design and computer-aided design/drafting. She holds a Masters of Fine Arts degree in photography from Rochester Institute of Technology and a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the University of Notre Dame. Her photographs have been exhibited in galleries across the US and abroad.


EXP-0123-F: Intellectual Property in Business and Society
Tuesday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Terrace Room, Paige Hall
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04073

Who owns an idea? Does a song, a photograph, or a line of software code belong to its creator, to the company that publishes it, or to its audience? Does it really matter to anyone what files are on your hard drive and where they came from? Why do companies charge so much more for brand-name sneakers, drugs, and tortilla chips when identical generic versions are readily available?

This course will explore current issues in intellectual property, including patents, trademarks, and copyrights, with examples from music to genetic research to advertising campaigns. We will review the laws and doctrines in this area, and examine how they are used and challenged in practice. We will look at current lawsuits, legislation, advocacy groups seeking to expand artistic independence and consumer awareness, and industry proposals intended to project "intangible assets" in the global knowledge economy. Students with an interest in science and technology, music and fine arts, communications, economics or sociology, as well as the law, are encouraged to attend.

Emily Woodward
(J96) is an intellectual property attorney. She has worked at several Boston-area biomedical and technology firms, after graduating from Northeastern University School of Law in 2000. She is a member of the Massachusetts Bar Association, the American Intellectual Property Lawyers Association, the Association of Corporate Counsel, and the Electronic Frontier Foundation.


EXP-0124-F: Consumer Society
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 110
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04074


iPhones…Manolo Blahniks…Escalades…McMansions…and, of course, "the mall." Consumerism is the hallmark of contemporary culture, but what are its causes? How did it evolve?
In this course we will use an interdisciplinary approach in studying the rise and spread of consumerism. In doing so, we will focus on the question as to whether or not modern societies place disproportionate significance on money and material possessions. In addition, we will consider how such an ethos impacts individual behavior, environmental quality, culture, public policy, and our quality of life. To gain a broad perspective on consumerism, we will draw upon research from various academic fields, including sociology, economics, anthropology, ecology, marketing, and psychology.

This course has been approved to count toward American Studies major credit.

Brian Roach
is currently employed as a research associate with the Global Development and Environmental Institute at Tufts University. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of California/Davis.


EXP-0125-F: Understanding Self for Peace and Social Change
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Eaton 333
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04075

What role does a quest for deeper purpose/meaning in our lives – our sense of awe, our spiritual journey – play in the work we choose to do in order to further social change? How might our inner peace be central to this work we do for ourselves and others? How does this prevent burn-out from the challenges and suffering we are working to alleviate?

This course will examine what has been called our responsibility as world citizens. A key and experiential component of this course will be to study and learn mindfulness practice tools to enrich our own lives and maximize our own well-being so we can continue to be effective in our work. We will pay special attention to how individual responsibility impacts the world and how one's environment, including social and political factors, influences individual well-being. This will include looking carefully at the question of what constitutes well-being, how we go about making choices based on economic, social and environmental consequences, and what we can do when there is not enough evidence for choosing "The Best" approach.

This course has been approved to count toward Peace and Justice Studies credit.

David Arond
has taught at Tufts University's School of Medicine, the Experimental College, and Peace and Justice Studies. His background is in behavioral medicine and public health. He is also a board certified pediatrician. He has been a mindfulness teacher for eighteen years and was ordained by Zen Master, Thich Nhat Hanh, a master of mindfulness practices.


EXP-0128-F: An Attorney's Guide to Criminal Law
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Olin 002
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04078

Was justice served when O.J. Simpson was ordered to pay $30 million to his victims' families even though the criminal jury found him not guilty? Did his lawyers do their job? What about the lawyers for the Brown and Goldman families?

This course will provide students with an overview of crime, criminal procedure and criminal practice both from a prosecutor's and a defense attorney's standpoint. We will explore such questions as: How does a criminal defense attorney defend someone he/she knows is guilty? Why do we have juries when judges are more experienced in determining guilt or innocence? Why are signed admissions of guilt sometimes excluded from evidence at trial? In order to engage in this exploration, we will review statutes, rulebooks, actual judicial decisions and the Constitution, plus transcripts, pleadings, motions and other documents actually filed and litigated in recent criminal cases in Massachusetts courts.

Jonathan Plaut
(A92) is a practicing Massachusetts attorney who graduated from Tufts University in 1992 and Boston College Law School in 1997. He is the principal of Chardon Law Offices in Boston and a former Assistant District Attorney for Norfolk County, Massachusetts. Part of his current practice is criminal defense, where he represents people accused of drug trafficking, financial crimes, insurance fraud, violent crimes and a variety of other crimes.


EXP-0129-F: 1968: The Year of the Century
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Braker 001
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04079

It's hard to think of a year in American history that was as dysfunctional as 1968. Even the number-one song reflected the strangeness: Hello I Love You, Won't You Tell Me Your Name. At the same time, it's hard to think of a year that had a more profound impact on American life.

In this course, students will explore a year which saw a sitting president, Lyndon Johnson, decide not to run for re-election because of pressure from within his own party; the assassinations of Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy; anti-war protests turning into police riots at the Democratic Convention in Chicago; the opening of the musical, Hair; and the election of Richard M. Nixon. Topics to be studied include the phenomenon of the "baby boomer" generation, the rise of the "counterculture," the anti-war movement, the "silent majority," race relations, and the manifest, conflicting visions of America. Finally we will attempt to determine the ways in which 1968 still affects us today.

This course has been approved to count toward American Studies credit and toward Communications and Media Studies credit as a Social Science elective.

Michael Goldman
is president of Goldman Associates, a communications consulting firm located in Boston that specializes in public relations, government liaison, and campaign consulting for both the private sector and public-sector candidates. He also teaches in the Political Science department at Tufts.


EXP-0130-F: The Boundaries of Dissent: The Criticism of Israel and Anti-Semitism
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Braker 220
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04080

Does criticizing Israel inevitably lend support to those who deny the state's right to exist? Is it always anti-Semitic, whether conscious or not? What about Jews who criticize Israel?

This course will explore the complex nature of such questions. It will attempt to determine legitimate boundaries for the debate and will deal with issues crystallized by the recent publication of two texts – John Mearsheimer and Stephen Walt's paper titled "The Israeli Lobby and US Foreign Policy" and former President Jimmy Carter's book, Palestine: Peace not Apartheid. We will look at how these works have brought, once again, to the forefront the debate regarding the distinction between legitimate criticism of Israeli policy and anti-Semitism. We will also explore the work of such Jewish scholars as Alvin Rosenfeld and his warnings against the rise in Jewish anti-Semitism or more commonly known as "self-hating Jews" and the dangers of progressive Jewish political analysis which often, in his argument, legitimizes anti-Semitism.

This course has been approved to count toward Judaic Studies major credit.

Ronnie Olesker
has been teaching in the Political Science department at Tufts for three years and has taught at the ExCollege twice. She holds a Ph.D. from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts. Her research was on the rise in the legal discrimination of Palestinian citizens of Israel and the effects of this discrimination on their support for political violence. She also has a law degree specializing in international law.


EXP-0131-F: Road Trip: The Automobile, Travel, and American Culture
Thursday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Crane Room, Paige Hall
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04081

From New England diners to California hot rods – and all the tourist traps in between – the American landscape reflects our love affair with hitting the road.

This course examines tourism in the automobile age and how it reflects culture, tastes, and values. We will consider the extent to which automobile tourism is a classically American phenomenon that has come to define us as a nation and as individuals. Coursework will include a sampling of literature, film, advertisements, and pop culture; in-depth study of famous highways; a study of automobile culture, destination planning, road archaeology, plus one road trip of your own. Haven't you always wanted to be a "Roads" Scholar?

This course has been approved to count toward American Studies major credit.

Dan Yaeger
is a destination planning professional who has developed tourism programs across the U.S. and abroad. He was born on the "Mother Road", Route 66, and has practiced road archaeology for more than 25 years. He is currently a fellow at Brown University's John Nicholas Brown Center for the Study of Public Humanities.


EXP-0132-F: The Video Game Industry: A Business Perspective
Thursday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Eaton 202
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04082

Do you enjoy playing video games? Did you ever wonder what it takes to actually create a game?

This course will take students inside the video game industry for an in-depth look at how this $14 billion dollar industry operates. We will look at the video game industry from a hands-on business perspective. In doing so, we will examine the economic and creative forces that shape the industry, the role developers, publishers and hardware manufacturers play, and where the challenges and opportunities lie in the ever-changing landscape of the video game business.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Social Science elective.

Scott Triola
is currently the Chief Operating Officer at Blue Fang Games. In this role and his previous role as a Brand Manager at Atari, he has had extensive professional exposure to nearly all aspects of the video game industry. He holds an M.B.A. from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania.


EXP-0133-F: Birth of the Tube: An Early History of Television
Thursday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Eaton 203
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04083

Television in its early days transformed American society with such force and so dramatically that is hard for those who didn't live through it to imagine.

This class will explore the beginnings of the medium and will attempt to come to terms with its significance in our lives as the central means of processing and disseminating entertainment, news and information on their lives and culture. We will deal with issues of journalism, politics, censorship, consumerism and cultural trends as influenced by and influencers of the medium of television. We will also look at the exciting adventures of the people who pioneered the medium and the events that shaped its birth, including its radio origins and experimental television.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as an Humanities and the Arts elective.

Henry Dane
is a career media communications professional who has been a writer, producer and editor of on-air promotion at New England TV stations and national networks.


EXP-0136-F: The Power of Narrative: Exploring the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict Through Literature and Film
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Crane Room, Paige Hall
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04086

Many analysts have described the Israeli-Palestinian conflict as a struggle between two clashing narratives. This course aims to explore these two narratives through the lens of literature and film. Course material will include books and films created by and about Israelis and Palestinians, as well as by outside observers, about the experience of living within the reality of this conflict. These will include such films as Palestine: Promises, Walk on Water, and Home Game and such texts as Elie Wiesel's Dawn, Amos Oz' Elsewhere, Perhaps, and Rashid Kahlidi's The Iron Cage.

The course seeks to provide a deeper lens into the conflict, and offer an opportunity to both reflect on the past and share ideas about the future of the conflict and peace-building in the region. The format of the course will be dialogue-based, with students engaging in conversation about the materials presented, and sharing their own perspectives on the narratives. The course is co-taught by two professional dialogue facilitators, and is a part of the Pathways Interfaith Initiative at Tufts.

Shai Fuxman is a doctoral student at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, pursuing his studies in Peace Education in the Israeli-Palestinian context.
 
Najiba Akbar is finishing a Masters' degree in Social Work at Boston College and has a Bachelors' Degree in Peace and Justice.


EXP-0137-F: Research for Success: Using the Library for Thesis and Capstone Projects
Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Tisch Library Room 223
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04152

Are you thinking about writing an honors thesis during your senior year, or are you already preparing to write one? Would you like to get a head start or immediate help in understanding the research process? Would you enjoy sharing what you learn as you become an expert in the subject area you are investigating?

This course will introduce students to the major research tools and search techniques at an intermediate-to-advanced level specific to your subject area. Each will develop a working bibliography of resources as well as a plan for continuing their research.

Note: This is an eight week course.

Regina Raboin
is the Science Reference Librarian and Reference Microforms/Current Periodicals Coordinator at Tisch Library.

Laurie Sabol
is the Coordinator of Library Instruction at Tisch Library.


EXP-0138-F: Obesity and Children
Thursday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Aidekman 9
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04153

This course will use a multi-faceted approach to look at the obesity epidemic in young people. The goal of this course is to give students a comprehensive knowledge of the scientific, social and political issues which permeate the problem of childhood obesity. We will discuss current and ongoing research in the field as well as look at government run programs with a critical thinking approach. In addition, we will look at initiatives that are succeeding around the country as well as examine case studies in Massachusetts. At the end of the semester students will use their acquired knowledge to come up with recommendations and strategies to reduce childhood obesity.

This course will count as a related course toward the Child Development major. For more information, contact Professor George Scarlett in Child Development, x2248.

Jacqueline Dick
is a health and nutrition consultant with twenty years of experience. She is the founder of "Wellness Perspectives" a program that provides educational workshops for teachers and health and nutrition workshops for students.  She has been very involved in many federally funded, for profit and non profit health and nutrition programs.


EXP-0139-F: The Rise of Corporate Power
Monday, 6:30-9:00 PM, Jackson 5
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04154

What actually is a "corporation"? Have corporations become too powerful?
In this course we will explore these questions and in doing so delve into the history of the corporation and its evolution, for better or worse, into a cornerstone of the contemporary world. We will consider recent cases of corporations acting against the public interest, for example: Enron defrauding employees, consumers, and shareholders alike, Wal-Mart paying below-market wages and driving out locally-owned competitors, and pharmaceutical companies dragging their feet when asked to reduce drug prices to help combat such diseases as AIDS. At the same time we will look at corporate giving and at movements within the corporate world to change current practices.

Sarah Horsley holds a M.P.P. from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard where she focused on corporate accountability and the impact of current economic policies on workers and poor communities. She is Communications and Campaigns Director at the National Network of Abortion Funds.


SPECIAL COURSES


EXP-0010-F: Moving Beyond Diversity
Tuesday, 4:30-7:00 PM, Olin 002
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04044

We want a college with "diversity," but what does that mean?  Once we find ourselves members of this "diverse" community, then what?  This discussion course explores topics of diversity in the U.S. that are seldom mentioned openly.  For example, when students of color sit together in the dining hall, why do we think  they are "segregating" themselves?  Do we ever think the same of a group of white students?  How do we use words like "queer" and "gay?"  And how do we understand class privilege?  We will focus on topics (i.e. stereotypes, power, privilege, oppression) and experiences related to our identities growing up in the U.S., especially as they pertain to the work of the Group of 6 (Africana, Asian American, International, Latino, Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender, and Women's Centers).  We'll have opportunities for self-exploration and learning through readings, discussions, and interactive exercises.  Is this for you?  Definitely, if your mind opens onto a willingness to learn and be personally challenged in a supportive atmosphere.

This is a first year advising seminar and enrollment is only open to those new students assigned to this section.

Linell Yugawa
is the Director of the Asian American Center at Tufts University.


EXP-0011-F: Class Matters
Wednesday, 4:30-7:00 PM, Latino Center, 226 College Avenue
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04045

How do we define class in the United States? What is the relationship between socio-economic class and race and ethnicity? Do we live in a meritocracy? Do we all have an equal chance of achieving the American Dream? These and other questions will be the focus of this full credit, pass/fail advising course. At a time of growing inequality in the United States, the issue of socio-economic class is often left out of discussions on diversity, particularly in our universities. This course will attempt to provide a safe environment where students from all walks of life can discuss these issues openly. The course will include readings, films, interactive activities, field trips and outside speakers. Additional topics to be discussed include financial aid, homelessness, Walmart, globalization, healthcare, the working poor, and the undocumented.

This is a first year advising seminar and enrollment is only open to those new students assigned to this section.

Ruben Salinas Stern
is the Director of the Latino Center at Tufts University.


EXP-0035 Rape Aggression Defense
Section AF: Half Course Credit, Pass/Fail, Call #TBA. Monday, 4:00-6:00 PM, South Hall Basement Lounge.

The Rape Aggression Defense System (R.A.D.) is based on the philosophy of choices: "to develop and enhance the OPTIONS of self defense, so that they become more viable considerations for the woman who is attacked."

While it is completely natural to resist, unless a woman is trained to do so, the resistance she attempts may be futile. This course will try to strengthen innate survival techniques by making more options available. Preparation through education and training is usually the best way to survive an assault situation. Issues to be addressed include awareness and prevention, sexual assault definitions, patterns of encounter, the decision to resist, basic principles of self-defense, and the defensive mindset. This course will end with realistic simulation training.

Jessica Bruno and Mark Roche are members of the Tufts University Police Department and certified R.A.D. instructors. They will lead the Monday section.


EXP-0044-F: Science Elementary Education Partners
Wednesday, 4:30-5:45 PM, Olin 112
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04046

Do you enjoy working with young kids, showing them hands-on activities and that learning can be fun? Are you wondering if teaching might be a career for you? This is your chance to work with 1st through 5th graders in one of our host community schools and effect a change in these students! SEEP is an initiative that emphasizes science experiments and activities to engage young students in their own learning while working with teachers in their classrooms. Tufts students will meet together regularly in a seminar to share experiences, discuss current educational issues, learn effective teaching strategies and work through lots of interesting and fun hands-on science lessons. In addition to the seminar, Tufts students will spend three hours per week in a host school helping with science activities.

This course represents a partnership between Tisch College and the Experimental College.

Ronnee Yashon
holds degrees in Biology, Chemistry, Computer Education, and Law. She has taught human genetics and general biology, bioethics and the law for more than twenty years. She is also the author of a series, Case Studies in Bioethics, and a book, Landmark Legal Cases for Scientists.


EXP-0050-CF: Media Literacy and Social Change
Monday, 1:30-4:00 PM, Rabb Room, Lincoln Filene
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04047

In a media-saturated world, endless possibilities exist for what we can watch, read, listen to, and create. Yet all too often, the flood of images overwhelms us, paralyzes us, and shapes our perceptions of ourselves, others, and the world.

This class will focus on how we can deconstruct media images in order to use the media for positive social change and to avoid being used by it. We will examine media stereotypes of gender, ethnicity, race, and class; explore the role of the "citizen journalist;" discuss ways that new media has changed the traditional media landscape; and think about the impact of media convergence and the ethical issues that arise when a few corporations own the majority of news, entertainment, publishing, and internet outlets. Finally, by examining scholarly research, film clips, TV news and hearing guest speakers, we will focus on the importance of media literacy in everyday lives and how to use the media to become an active citizen.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a Social Sciences elective.

This course represents a partnership between the Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service and the Communications and Media Studies program.

Julie Dobrow
is the Director of the Communications and Media Studies program at Tufts. She holds a Ph.D. in Communications from the Annenberg School at the University  of Pennsylvania.


EXP-0053-CF: Producing Films for Social Change
Tuesday and Thursday, 1:30-4:00 PM, Rabb Room (Tuesday), Halligan 105 (Thursday)
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04048

Are you ready for an intensive, hands-on course in which you will produce your own news documentaries? Do you care about such social issues as poverty, education, the environment, health care, human rights, gender, and race? Are you interested in covering community issues and using documentary to help inform the public?

This course will address the powerful role of video journalism as an advocacy tool to shape perceptions of policy and society. Students will learn the principles and techniques of documentary and TV news magazine journalism including directing, camera work, and editing. Special emphasis will be given to the role of media ethics, First Amendment principles, and current news events. The course will also emphasize the citizenship, active community leadership, and creative approaches to civic engagement. Class enrollment will be limited to sixteen students.

This course will count toward Mass Communications and Media Studies minor credit as a Media Practice elective and toward Film Studies minor credit as a Film Practice elective. It also has been approved to count toward American Studies major credit.

This course represents a partnership between the Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service and the Communications and Media Studies program.

Margaret Lazarus
is an Academy Award winning documentary filmmaker. Her documentaries have been about domestic violence, trauma and recovery, the impact of the media, political history, US international policy, rape, health and other issues relating to social justice.


EXP-0055-CF: History of Documentary Films
Wednesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Crane Room, Paige Hall
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04049

Thanks to digital video, cable TV, the web, and the unprecedented box office success of such films as An Inconvenient Truth and Sicko, documentary is enjoying a renaissance today.
In this course, students will develop critical viewing skills in beginning to understand the language and structures of film and television documentaries. We will examine the varied forms of documentary filmmaking including historical films, advocacy videos, political satire, propaganda, cinema verité and other depictions of "reality." We will discuss the evolution of documentary filmmaking and explore how these films have commented on and been influenced by society. Viewings will include such films as Salesman, Primary, Roger and Me, and Titicut Follies, to name a few.

This course will count toward the Mass Communications and Media Studies minor as a  Humanities elective and toward the Film Studies minor as a Film Studies elective.

Don Schechter
(A01, M03) is the founder of Charles River Media Group, a Boston-based video production and post-production company. He has worked on numerous documentaries and multimedia projects for such clients as A&E, NBC, The Rolling Stones, and The NY Times. Segments from his current documentary, A Good Whack, were recently shown on MSNBC and broadcast on the BBC.


EXP-0058-CF: Marketing for Social Change
Tuesday and Thursday, 10:30-11:45 AM, Rabb Room
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04050

Want to learn how to use the tools of marketing in order to connect with broad segments of society for the purpose of bringing about positive change?

In this course, students will not be creating a new advertising campaign or public relations initiative. Instead, the focus will be on gaining the fundamental knowledge base, skills and tools to understand who an audience is, what their perceptions are, and what the internal and external obstacles are to success when it comes to creating an affinity with that audience. Using such information, students will then be able to develop effective goals and strategies that will lead to a successful implementation plan, especially in the arena of social change. As part of our work, we'll review many cases studies, both domestically and internationally, looking at social marketing campaigns in areas ranging from environmental programs to health initiatives, human rights issues to women's rights.

This course will count toward Mass Communications and Media Studies minor credit as a Social Science elective.

Sandy Schultz Hessler
spent seven years working in Brand Management/Marketing at Proctor & Gamble, then co-founded Imagitas, a successful company which provides public service through private enterprise and, for the last five years, has consulted to non-profits in the areas of strategy and development.

EXP-0059-CF: Investigative Journalism - Watchdog of Democracy: Technique and Purpose in the 21st Century
Monday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Pearson 104
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04051

When the nation's attention turns to the neglect of wounded Iraqi war veterans or business executive exploiting insider stock information, it's the news media that have set the agenda. In particular, it's the work of a small cadre of investigative reporters. How do they operate? What rules do they play by? Who polices them? What tradition do they come out of? What are their techniques? How deep and wide is their impact? How will they evolve in the Internet era? Can we get along without them?

In this course, students will be expected to sharpen their analytical and investigative skills, while becoming acquainted with the historical role and current challenges of investigative journalism. Students will also be expected to strengthen their writing proficiency through a series of in-class exercises and outside assignments. Special attention will be paid to the journalist's take on such topics as law, ethics, government, politics and public policy.

In addition, we will tour the Boston Globe and Boston.com newsrooms. Guest lecturers drawn from Boston's public life will also visit the class.

This course will count toward Mass Communications and Media Studies minor credit as a Humanities elective.

Sean P. Murphy
studied history and political science at Tufts before going to a career in journalism that includes stints at the Associated Press and Gloucester Daily Times. For the last 20 years, Mr. Murphy has been an editor and reporter at the Boston Globe. As an investigative reporter, he covers the Big Dig, Indian casino gambling, and assorted examples of government malfeasance he has been able to unearth and document. A graduate of Suffolk University Law School, Mr. Murphy is one of the state's leading proponents -- and users -- of the state Public Records law. He taught a course at Tufts on the Big Dig in 2003 and lectures frequently to college students and journalist groups.


EXP-0090-AF: Teaching an Exploration Seminar
Monday, 12:00-12:45 PM or Thursday, 9:30-10:15 AM, (Miner 112)
1.5 credits, Pass/Fail, Call #04052

This course is designed to facilitate the team-teaching done by undergraduates leading first-semester seminars for entering students. Weekly group meetings are held in which student teachers are exposed to a range of teaching techniques and learning theories, asked to articulate their course goals, and given a forum for discussing the unique problems that inexperienced teachers often encounter. Students will be required to keep journals as an aid to reflection concerning their teaching.

Note: 90AF is a mandatory course for students leading Explorations seminars and enrollment is limited to these student-teachers.

Robyn Gittleman
, Director of the Experimental College and Associate Dean of Undergraduate Education, coordinates the Exploration program.


EXP-0090-BF: Teaching a Perspectives Seminar
Monday, 12:00-1:00 PM or Wednesday, 12:00-1:00 PM, Miner 112
1.5 credits, Pass/Fail, Call #04053

Similar to the Exploration Seminar, this course supports the students teaching in the Perspectives program, who all work under the umbrella topic of movies as art and industry.

Note: 90BF is a mandatory course for students leading Perspectives seminars and enrollment is limited to those student-teachers.

Howard Woolf
, Associate Director of the Experimental College, and Cindy Stewart, Assistant Director of the Experimental College, coordinate the Perspectives program.


EXP-0091-AF: Inquiry Teaching Group
To be arranged with instructors,
1.0 yearlong credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04054

Inquiry is a global-issues simulation for high school students from across the country and internationally. It forms an integral part of the year's activities for EPIIC. Students in this course will help design and plan a culminating simulation to be held during the Spring 2008 semester on Global Poverty. They will mentor a high school delegation - helping them understand the materials and issues, as well as preparing them for the simulation. Students in Inquiry will receive one credit for the full academic year.

Steve Cohen teaches in the Education department at Tufts and is the Chair of the Experimental College Board for the academic year, 2007-2008.

Heather Barry is the Associate Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts.


EXP-0091-F: EPIIC: Global Poverty
Tuesday and Thursday, 3:00-5:45 PM, Tisch 316
1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04055

Mass poverty is mankind's oldest, yet most pressing problem. Over a billion people subsist on less than a dollar a day, almost one in five. If the poverty line were raised to $2 a day over half the world's population is poor. Eight million people die each year simply because they are too poor to live. Every day, 30,000 children die because they are too poor to survive.

Over the past several decades, the percentage of the world's population living on less than a dollar a day has been cut in half. Global poverty is rapidly falling for @ 80% of the world. But over the next four decades, the population of developing countries will swell to nearly 8 billion, representing 86% of humanity.

Is there a "doom spiral," a crisis afflicting 50 failing states, the "Bottom Billion?" If so, are there ways to escape the "poverty traps" of civil war, the "resource curse," and the plague of bad governance? How to confront the radical impact and inequality of "corrupt capitalism" in developed countries? Indeed, poverty is not an abstraction in the U.S., where 37 million Americans live in poverty.

Eschewing ideology, we seek a nuanced, rigorous understanding of global poverty. How can we transcend the images of starving children, the stereotypes of ruthless corporations, and corrupt politicians, to create a realistic and meaningful agenda for action?

Sherman Teichman is Director of the Institute for Global Leadership at Tufts and the founding director of EPIIC (Education for Public Inquiry and International Citizenship). He holds a M.A. from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.


EXP-0096-F: Auditing for Breadth
0.5-1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04057

This program is intended to provide students with an opportunity to broaden their education by attending courses in which they might not otherwise enroll. With the approval of the instructors in question, students may elect to audit any three full-credit university courses (or the equivalent) during their four years. (One course credit is awarded upon completion of the three audits.) Please note: graduating seniors may audit two courses and receive one-half credit.

For more information about this program and an application, contact Robyn Gittleman or Cindy Stewart, at the Experimental College office, 95 Talbot Ave, x73384.


EXP-0099-CF: Media Internships
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04058

Supervised internship in communications and mass media. Student can intern at a newspaper, magazine, book publishing company, film production company, television or radio station, advertising or public relations firm, or other media outlet approved by instructor. Students must intern a minimum of 150 hours during the semester (usually 12-16 hours a week), fulfill written assignments, and meet regularly with the instructor. Registration by consent of instructor. Student should consult with instructor prior to researching and applying for internships, and must submit an Internship Agreement signed by the internship site supervisor prior to being allowed to register. Contact Susan Eisenhauer (susan.eisenhauer@tufts.edu).

This course will count toward Mass Communications and Media Studies minor credit as a Media Practice elective and toward Film Studies minor credit as a Film Practice elective.
Please note: enrollment is by consent only. For more information, contact Susan Eisenhauer, Associate Director of Communications and Media Studies, 95 Talbot Avenue, x72007.

Susan Eisenhauer
(J71) has a B.A. in English from Tufts and a M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. She has worked in many areas of media, including print journalism, television, radio, and public relations. Among other responsibilities, she directs the internship program, supervising more than 90 students each year who intern for credit at media organizations.


EXP-0101-CF: Advanced Filmmaking
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04059

Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who have completed EXP-0056-S "Making Movies" – or who are able to demonstrate equivalent competence – can continue their training as filmmakers. Students who initially qualify will present a "business plan" for their project and, if accepted, will receive credit, access to TuftsFilmWorks' production and editing equipment, and a supervised context within which to work. In return, they agree to watch a negotiated number of "source" films, keep a "Producer's Log," and write a final assessment, taking into account both the process they went through to produce their film and what they feel about the film once it's done.

This course will count toward Mass Communications and Media Studies minor credit as a Media Practice elective and toward Film Studies minor credit as a Film Practice elective.

Note: Enrollment is by consent only. For information on eligibility and registration, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, 7-3384.
Advanced Filmmaking is supported by the generosity of Lisa and Bruce Cohen (J86 and A83, respectively).

Howard Woolf
is Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks (the ExCollege's filmmaking center), co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.


EXP-0102-CF: Advanced Electronic and Digital Media
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04060

Based on a directed study model, this course provides the means by which students who are able to demonstrate an appropriate degree of competence can continue their training in the multimedia arts.

This course will count toward Media Practice credit for the Multimedia Arts minor.
Note: Enrollment is by consent only. For information on eligibility and registration, contact Howard Woolf, howard.woolf@tufts.edu, 7-3384.

Howard Woolf
is Associate Director of the Experimental College, as well as Director of Media Technology. He is the founder of TuftsFilmWorks (the ExCollege's filmmaking center), co-chairs the Multimedia Arts interdisciplinary minor, and is advisor to TUTV.


EXP-0134-F: The Writer's Craft: Practical and Theoretical Approaches
Tuesday and Thursday, 4:30-5:45 PM, Tisch 314
1.0 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04084

This course explores current research in the field of composition. It is designed to provide theoretical grounding to the practice of peer tutoring and the teaching of writing. Students will study writing theory and consider its practical application in the classroom and the writing center.
Topics will include: the role of peer tutors; conferencing techniques; writing in the disciplines; English as a Second Language; and discourse communities. Always, as we explore research on issues pertaining to writing, we will be looking for meaning on a practical as well as theoretical level. Discussions of student papers will be a standard means of applying knowledge acquired through reading to the reality of peer tutoring.

NOTE: This is a mandatory course for Writing Fellows and Writing Tutors and enrollment is limited to these groups.

Carmen Lowe
is Director of the Academic Resource Center at Tufts University.


EXP-0137-S Research for Success: Using the Library for Thesis and Capstone Projects
Half Course Credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04152. Tuesday, 6:00-8:30 PM, Tisch 223.

This is an eight-week course.

Are you thinking about writing an honors thesis during your senior year, or are you already preparing to write one? Would you like to get a head start or immediate help in understanding the research process? Would you enjoy sharing what you learn as you become an expert in the subject area you are investigating?

This course will introduce students to the major research tools and search techniques at an intermediate-to-advanced level specific to your subject area. Each will develop a working bibliography of resources as well as a plan for continuing their research.

Regina Raboin is the Science Reference Librarian and Reference Microforms/Current Periodicals Coordinator at Tisch Library.
Laurie Sabol is the Coordinator of Library Instruction at Tisch Library.


EXP-0190-BF: CMS Senior Colloquium
Wednesday, 12:00-12:50 PM, Terrace Room, Paige Hall
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04087

All CMS seniors thinking about doing the Senior Project must register for one of the two sections of the CMS Senior Colloquium. The colloquium aids seniors in developing their ideas, provides them with a forum for sharing resources and work strategies, and trains them in the scheduling and time management procedures necessary for successful completion of projects.

Registration for this course will be done in person with CMS Director Julie Dobrow. Bring an ADD form to her new office at 95 Talbot Ave on Tuesday, Sept. 4, between 9:00 am and 2:00 pm.

Leslie Goldberg
(J84) is the founder of Blue Sun Communications, a corporate communications consulting firm. Among her clients are the Tufts University College of Engineering. She holds a M.S. in Mass Communication from Boston University.


EXP-0190-CF: CMS Senior Colloquium
Thursday, 9:30-10:20 AM, Miner 112
0.5 credit, Pass/Fail, Call #04088

All CMS seniors thinking about doing the Senior Project must register for one of the two sections of the CMS Senior Colloquium. The colloquium aids seniors in developing their ideas, provides them with a forum for sharing resources and work strategies, and trains them in the scheduling and time management procedures necessary for successful completion of projects.

Registration for this course will be done in person with CMS Director Julie Dobrow. Bring an ADD form to her new office at 95 Talbot Ave on Tuesday, Sept. 4, between 9:00 am and 2:00 pm.

Julie Dobrow
is Director of Communications and Media Studies. She holds a Ph.D. in Communications from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania.


EXP-0192-F: Independent Study
0.5-1.0 credit, Letter-graded, Call #04089

By arrangement only. For more information, come by the Experimental College office, Miner Hall, or call us at x73384.